Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Apr 16th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

On With The Show

Film_festNew leadership preserves intrepid, independent vision in Santa Cruz Film Festival IX
One-woman human dynamo Jane Sullivan may be out of the picture, but the show will go on next week for the ninth annual Santa Cruz Film Festival. While Sullivan enjoys a much-deserved sabbatical, the festival's intrepid board of directors has risen to the challenge of producing SCFF IX, which begins Thursday, May 6, and runs through Sunday, May 15. Under the guidance of a newly created leadership team made up of longtime board members and festival veterans, SCFF IX will feature 133 films from 33 countries (40 of them locally produced) at multiple venues around town, along with a full slate of panels, workshops, parties, live music, gala receptions, and a demonstration of extreme hula-hooping.

The new team (including Director of Programming Julian Soler, Creative Director Eric Sassaman, Board President Allie Wilson, and Development Director Jess Damsen, among others) continues founder Sullivan's commitment to cutting-edge, original cinema. This year, says Soler, “the line-up is arguably the strongest in its history. The new leadership team has produced a diverse, compelling and incredible event. The locally produced work is especially exceptional. La Vie en Verte: The WAMM Movie and The Westsiders offer true and honest portraits of Santa Cruz and its history.” The festival also continues its longstanding commitment to green politics, partnering once again with the EarthVision Film Festival to present nine features and 18 short films dedicated to environmental activism.

Unspooling at three main venues downtown (the Del Mar, the Regal Riverfront Stadium Twin, and Community TV), SCFF IX kicks off with an opening night red carpet event May 6 at the Del Mar. Screening of the music documentary Soundtrack For A Revolution (see sidebar) will be followed by a gala reception at the Museum of Art & History, featuring soul food cuisine, music and dancing. The festival concludes on May 15 with a closing night gala and awards ceremony at the Del Mar and a screening of the locally made feature, Etienne, followed by a closing night party at the Cypress Lounge.

In between, SCFF IX offers local, national, and international features loosely organized into thematic categories. In addition to the EarthVision environmental films, there are World Cinema, Documentaries, and “Keep Santa Cruz Weird”—local films by local artists. Topics are diverse, from Native Hawaiian dropouts living on the Na film_HoopingLifePali Coast (Drop In, Drop Out: 11 Miles to Paradise), to the first solar panel business in Mali (Burning In The Sun). In Orgasm Inc., a woman uncovers corporate shenanigans in the search to develop a “female Viagra;” in Semshook, an Indian-born Tibetan crosses the Himalayas to find himself. Earthling is a sci-fi drama about identity, The Hooping Life celebrates the extreme reinvention of hula-hooping, and The Miscreants of Taliwood explores guerrilla filmmaking under the Taliban. Five documentaries and five fiction features are in competition for Jury prizes; this year's fest will also see the inauguration of a new prize: the Morton Marcus Audience Award for Best Feature.

Most features will screen with appropriate short films. The rest of this year's shorts are gathered in anthology programs: You Don't Choose Your Family (family dynamics), Take Action (green activism), We're Having A Disconnect (communication breakdowns), Men In Uniform (military, medical, sports, etc.), That Can't Be (fantasy, fanciful, and sci-fi). There are two programs of locally-made shorts, Close To Home and Locally Grown, along with Reel Fresh: Next Generation Video (from Cabrillo and Santa Cruz County High School students), and a UC Santa Cruz Student Film Showcase: The Future In 15 Minutes Or Less.

Several film-related panels and workshops will be offered free to the public. UCSC grad and Pixar artist Paul Topolus will talk about animation at the Digital Media Factory (Mission Street Extension at Swift Street), Saturday, May 8, at 1 p.m. EarthVision filmmakers will participate in an environmentally oriented panel at Community TV on Sunday, May 9, 1:30-2:30 p.m. The Wo/Men's Alliance for Medical Marijuana will present a panel at the new SCFF Filmmaker Hub (1101-F Pacific Ave., at Cathcart Street) at 3 p.m. Saturday, May 8, in connection with their festival feature, La Vie En Verte: The WAMM Movie (see sidebar). And filmmakers will discuss “Life After Film School,” Friday, May 14, at noon, at the Digital Media Factory.

Festival passes, providing access to all SCFF film screenings, events, parties, and workshops, are available for $175 (general admission), $150 (senior) and $100 (student). Tickets can also be purchased on a per-program basis, $7-$9 for regular programs, $18-$20 for the opening night, and $10-$12 for the closing night galas. For a complete lineup of films, events, schedules and ticket info, visit the festival website at scfilmfest.org.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Animal Magnetism

Bear, mouse dare to be friends in charming ‘Ernest and Celestine’ It’s not exactly Romeo and Juliet. It’s not even a romance, although it is a love story about two individuals separated by prejudice who find the courage to form an unshakable bond despite the rules and traditions that keep them apart.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.