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Movies & Film Events: Week of Dec. 3

film_armored_ver2ARMORED Columbus Short stars in this action thriller about a new driver at an armored truck company coerced by his cohorts into joining them in a $42 million truck heist that goes awry. Matt Dillon, Jean Reno, and Laurence Fishburne co-star for director Nimród Antal (Kontroll) (PG-13) 88 minutes. Starts Friday.
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film_brothersBROTHERS Tobey Maguire is the reliable older brother presumed dead in Afghanistan returning home from a POW camp. Jake Gyllenhaal is the ex-con younger brother who's moved in on his brother's wife (Natalie Portman) when she thought she was a widow. The great Jim Sheridan (In America) directs this adaptation from a Danish film by Susanne Bier. Sam Shepard, Mare Winningham, Clifton Collins Jr., and Carey Mulligan co-star. (R) 110 minutes. Starts Friday.
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film_everybodys_fineEVERYBODY'S FINE Reviewed this issue. (PG-13) 100 minutes. (★★★) Starts Friday.
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film_red_cliff_ver3RED CLIFF Reviewed this issue. (R) 148 minutes. (★★★) Starts Friday.
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film_transylmaniaTRANSYLMANIA The frat-boy comedy goes Twilight in this horror farce about American college kids taking a semester at a spooky university in Transylvania. Patrick Cavanaugh, James De Bello, and Tony Denman star for sibling directors (and National Lampoon veterans) David and Scott Hillenbrand. (R) 95 minutes. Starts Friday.
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Film Events
SPECIAL EVENT THIS WEEK: ITALIAN FILM SERIES : PRANZO DI FERRAGOSTO (MID-AUGUST LUNCH) Gianni Di Gregorio (scriptwriter for Gomorrah) stars in his directing debut, a gentle comedy from 2008 about a middle-aged man living with his elderly mother who starts taking in other neglected, elderly women to make ends meet. The women in the movie, who are not professional actresses, have powered the film to seven international awards. (Not rated) 75 minutes. In Italian, with English subtitles. At the Vets Hall (846 Front Street, downtown Santa Cruz), Sunday only, 7 pm. Suggested donation: $5.

CONTINUING SERIES: MIDNIGHTS @ THE DEL MAR Eclectic movies for wild & crazy tastes plus great prizes and buckets of fun for only $6.50. This week: DOUBLE INDEMNITY Fred MacMurray is a good man gone bad after one look at hardboiled urban temptress Barbara Stanwyck's racy ankle bracelet in Billy Wilder's 1944 film noir classic. Edward G. Robinson is the insurance claims investigator trying to sort out their sordid murder plot. Wilder wrote the script with Raymond Chandler, from the James M. Cain novel. (Not rated) 107 minutes. (★★★★)—Lisa Jensen. Fri-Sat midnight only. At the Del Mar.

CONTINUING EVENT: LET'S TALK ABOUT THE MOVIES This informal movie discussion group meets at the Del Mar mezzanine in downtown Santa Cruz. Movie junkies are invited to join in on Wednesday nights at 7 pm. Visit www.ltatm.org.

 


Now Playing

AN EDUCATION Drenched in early '60s atmosphere, and impeccably produced in every detail, Lone Scherfig's adaptation of the Lynn Barber memoir tells a familiar story about a dewy-eyed young women and a worldly older man. The plot is never entirely believable onscreen, but the emotions involved are explored with honesty, insight, and humor. Newcomer Carey Mulligan plays the schoolgirl heroine with disarming girlishness, pert sophistication, and tart self-awareness. But Peter Sarsgaard is not a naturally irresistible charmer; as the older man, his emotional palette seems studied and insincere. That he worms himself so easily into her parents' good graces is a credibility gap from which the film never recovers. (PG-13) 95 minutes. (★★1/2)—Lisa Jensen.

A SERIOUS MAN Joel and Ethan Coen set this strikingly deadpan, comic tragedy in a suburban midwestern Jewish community ca. 1967. The setting couldn't be more personal to the Coens, but the questions they raise about faith, tradition, family values, and the meaning of life are universal—however wickedly perverse the Coens' perspective may be. Everyman Larry Gopnik (Michael Stuhlbarg) is a university math professor whose life is starting to unravel. Increasingly frazzled, yet ever accommodating, Larry's crises seem to pile up in direct proportion to the ineffectuality of his responses. Turning to a series of rabbis to help him understand God's plan in sending him so much grief, all he gets are half-baked analogies and pointless fables. Dripping acerbic wit, the film is a weirdly engrossing portrait of meltdown in the face of a chaotic universe over which there may not be any plan. The one piece of useful advice anyone gets in the movie (from a very unexpected source) slyly suggests the continuity with which humans try to provide comforting answers to imponderable questions from one generation to the next. (R) 105 minutes. (★★★)—Lisa Jensen.

THE BLIND SIDE  The real-life story of All-American football star Michael Oher is dramatized in this inspirational tale. Sandra Bullock stars as the neighbor woman who virtually adopts the homeless, neglected teenage Oher into her family and changes his life—and theirs. Newcomer Quinton Aaron plays Oher. Tim McGraw and Kathy Bates co-star for director John Lee Hancock (The Rookie). (PG-13) 126 minutes.

COCO BEFORE CHANEL The rise of  Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel from impoverished orphan to one of the most influential of 20th Century fashion designers is perfect for the big, lush biopic treatment.  In French with English subtitles. (★★★)—Lisa Jensen.

THE DAMNED UNITED Michael Sheen turns in another beautifully calibrated performance as a real-life character from recent British history: legendary 1970s  soccer manager Brian Clough, notorious in Britain for his ego, his gift of gab, and his skill in shepherding hopeless Third Division teams from the north of England into stunning and impossible championships. Director Tom Hooper navigates the story's fragmented time frame with skill and clarity, while scriptwriter Peter Morgan (The Queen; Frost/Nixon) delivers a bracing, near-epic drama of supreme hubris, profound vindication, and dazzling chutzpah. But mostly this witty and merrily profane film rackets along on the charismatic brio of Sheen, who is marvelous fun to watch throughout. (R) 97 minutes. (★★★1/2) —Lisa Jensen

DISNEY'S A CHRISTMAS CAROL It’s hard not to walk away impressed by his imaginative undertaking. Jim Carrey morphs into Charles Dickens’ Scrooge—as well as the ghosts of Christmas Past, Present and Future—in this animated action retelling of the classic tale. Director Robert Zemeckis (The Polar Express) creates wonders here—see the 3D version. Meanwhile Gary Oldman delivers a winning turn as Bob Cratchit (as well as Marley's Ghost). Colin Firth is nephew Fred; Bob Hoskins is Mr. Fezziwig. Great for the kids, but adults will relish all the savvy technical nuances here. Beyond the retelling of a classic, this is one masterful piece of art. (PG) (★★★1/2)—Greg Archer

FANTASTIC MR. FOX Wes Anderson (of all people) directs this adaptation of the Roald Dahl children's story using vintage-style stop-motion animation techniques. George Clooney and Meryl Streep provide voices fo Mr. And Mrs. Fox, whose happy suburban life is threatened when Mr. Fox gives in to his animal instincts and endangers the entire animal community. Jason Schwartzman, Bill Murray, Owen Wlson, and Michael Gambon also contribute voices. (PG) 88 minutes.

THE FOURTH KIND Milla Jovovich stars in this paranormal thriller as an investigator who uncovers a mother lode of videotaped evidence of 40 years of alien abductions in Nome, Alaska.  Elias Koteas and Will Patton co-star for director Olatunde Osunsanmi. (PG-13)

THE MEN WHO STARE AT GOATS the good news? This is a dream cast. George Clooney, Jeff Bridges and Kevin Spacey. What can go wrong? Not al lot—but enough. This clever Cold War comedy based on the non-fiction bestseller by Jon Ronson finds Ewan McGregor as a reporter suddenly befriended by a Special Ops agent (Clooney offering a terrific turn).  Apparently Clooney’s character is part of an experimental U. S. military unit  that’s all about developing psychic warfare. Bridges plays the founder of the unit; Spacey is his nemesis. There are some fine comedic moments here but the film never really shines the way it could. True, the nuttiness of the premise automatically suggests the filmmakers will never really dive deep enough for us to really know the characters, but at the very least, you’d love to walk away caring about what happens to them. That really doesn’t happen (enough) here. Directed by Grant Heslov (R) 93 minutes. (★★1/2)—Greg Archer

THE MESSENGER  In Oren Moverman's rigorous and insightful debut feature, Ben Foster gives a taut, quietly implosive performance as a wounded Iraq War vet serving out the rest of his tour back in the States, notifying loved ones that their sons, husbands and fathers have been killed in action. The film honors the sacrifices of servicemen and women and their families, while at the same time exposing the true cost of war, and the bitter reality beneath the patriotic hype and hoopla.Woody Harrelson plays the plummy role of Foster's glibly profane partner/mentor with panache; Samantha Morton provides grace and heart as a new widow. (R) 105 minutes. (★★★)—Lisa Jensen.

MICHAEL JACKSON: THIS IS IT Culled from over a hundred hours of rehearsal footage, this feature film documents the performance the late star was preparing for his comeback world tour. Shot at the Staples Center in LA,  between March and June, 2009, the film is directed by Kenny Ortega, who was also directing Jackson's stage show. Here's your chnce to see it on a big screen, for a limited two-week engagement. (PG) (★★★1/2)—Greg Archer

NINJA ASSASSIN Korean pop star Rain plays the title role in this contemporary martial arts action thriller about an orphan plucked off the streets and turned into a killing machine by a crime syndicate who goes rogue and turns against his mentors after the murder of a friend. Naomie Harris co-stars as a Europol agent on the trail of the syndicate who joins the assassin on his quest for revenge. Rick Yune co-stars for director James McTeigue (V for Vendetta). (R) 99 minutes.

OLD DOGS John Travolta and Robin Williams star in this family comedy as a couple of single, middle-aged buddies. (PG)

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY Buzz is huge and still building over Oren Peli's no-budget horror thriller, after two sold-out preview weekends as a midnight show at the Del Mar. It's about a young couple who think their new house is haunted; they set up a video camera in their bedroom to record any malevolent activity—and boy, does it ever. Don't see it alone.

PIRATE RADIO This latest ensemble comedy from Richard Curtis (Love Actually) harks back to the late '60s when rock 'n' roll was banned from the staid BBC airwaves, forcing an intrepid crew of renegade djs to broadcast The Who, The Stones, Cream, etc, from an oil tanker in the North Sea, just outside British jurisdiction. Real-life pirate radio stations (like Radio Caroline) were a fact of life in '60s Britain; names have been changed to protect the notorious. Bill Nighy, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Rhys Ifans star. (R) 120 minutes.

PLANET 51 Think of E.T. in reverse in this animated comedy about a U.S. astronaut who lands on a supposedly uninhabited planet. (PG) 91 minutes.

PRECIOUS Lee Daniels' masterful film, adapted from the 1996 novel, "Push," by poet-turned-author Sapphire, shows how the tiniest flicker of compassion can transform a life of complete degradation into something triumphant. Gabourey Sidibe gives an astounding, adjective-defying performance in the title role, a wary, mountainous, hard-luck Harlem teenager who has learned to hide her spirit beneath protective layers of flesh and silence. But Sidibe reveals the vibrant, questing self inside the character with grace and a fierce authenticity. Mo'Nique is incendiary as the girl's toxic mother in this uncompromising, inventive and rewarding film. (R) 109 minutes. (★★★★)—Lisa Jensen

2012 You have to wonder about a movie that purports to be about the "survivors" after "the end of the world." John Cusack, Amanda Peet, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Thandie Newton are among those caught up in the aftermath of disasters following the end of part (although, evidently not all) of the world.  (PG-13) 160 minutes.

THE TWILIGHT SAGA: NEW MOON Oy! Twilight. A brooding teenage gal who should be on some meds falls for an unavailable vamp, all the while avoiding the delicious advances of an available eco-sexual hunky-and-shirtless virgin teen werewolf. Yes. It's a much more warped "Romeo & Juliet" for the texting generation. I just hate to see the therapy bills in 10 years. Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart get paid millions to moan and groan here but it’s Taylor Lautner that steals the show as a teen werewolf. Taylor meet Fame; Fame, meet Taylor. (And keep your shirt off.) Chris Weitz directs. (PG-13) 130 minutes. (★★)—Greg Archer

WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE Maurice Sendak's classic children's book hits the screen, thanks to the noteworthy direction of Spike Jonze (Being John Malkovich)—Dave Eggers is co-scriptwriter. The bottom line? This a film you’ll either truly be captivated by or not all interested in. Jonze creates a powerful, often emotional landscape here, and newcomer Max Records aptly morphs into the troubled protagonist, Max, the little boy who suddenly finds himself in an imaginary—although you could question that— world of “wild things” that soon make him king of their world. (PG) 101 minutes.  (★★★)—Greg Archer

WOMEN IN TROUBLE Filmmaker Sebastian Gutierrez has written some scripts with Pedro Almodóvar, and this stylized ensemble comedy about random women who meet, share secrets, and bond during a day in L. A. is very much in the vein of the latter's florid farcical melodramas. The dialogue can be amusing; what's missing is the earthy humanism and compassion in the best Almodóvar films. Gutierrez's dizzy femmes careen around in an alternative universe of sexy silliness. (Only the intrepid Carla Gugino has enough screen time and chutzpah to earn viewer sympathy.) Gutierrez borrows the lollipop veneer of his mentor's films without providing a reason to care about any of it. This is Almodóvar Lite. (R) 92 minutes. (★★)—Lisa Jensen.

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Best of Santa Cruz County 2014

The 2014 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll Come on in, and have a look around. There’s a lot to see—hundreds of winners selected by thousands of GT readers across Santa Cruz County. So if some of this looks familiar, it’s probably because you helped make it happen. But there are always new things to discover, too—you could go to a different winner or runner-up every day in the Food and Drink category alone, and you’d be booked just about until next year’s Best of Santa Cruz County issue comes out.

 

Something Essential Disappears

Lunar and solar eclipses follow one another. Lunar eclipses occur at full moons, and solar eclipses at new moons. Two weeks ago at the full moon we had the blood red moon—a total lunar eclipse (the next one is Oct. 8). On Monday night, April 28 (new moon), as the Sun, Moon and Earth align, a solar eclipse (Sun obscured) occurs. Eclipses signify something irrevocably is changed in our world. The Sun is our essential life force. Monday’s new moon, 9 degrees Taurus, is also an annular solar eclipse when the Moon moves centrally in front of the Sun, yet does not cover the Sun completely. The Sun's outer edges, still visible, form a “ring of fire” around the Moon.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 24

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Palate-Stretching 101

A wine education with Soif’s experts As a veteran of many weekend wine “seminars” at Soif, I have to confess that I’ve never known less (going in) and learned more (coming out) than I did last week at the Spanish Wine Tasting with ace rep Brian Greenwood. These are classy, casual events and it’s hard to imagine having this much flavor fun anywhere for $20.

 

Martin Ranch Winery

Sauvignon Blanc 2011 One of my favorite wines is Sauvignon Blanc, and this one made by Martin Ranch is particularly lovely. Bright, crisp and refreshing, it’s perfect to pair with fish and shellfish—and good for picnics as it has an easy screw-cap bottle. There’s nothing worse than setting down your blanket, pulling out your sandwiches—and then realizing you don’t have a corkscrew.

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management