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Jul 28th
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Cover Stories

Cover Stories

Stripping Down

Stripping Down

In the new book, ‘The Rise of the Naked Economy,’ local authors Ryan Coonerty and Jeremy Neuner examine the transformation of how people do work

Over the past decade, the modern workplace has undergone profound transformations. The traditional models that enveloped employees, like regular work hours, office cubicles, full-time work weeks, and benefit packages, have fallen away, forcing many to take multiple part-time jobs, or proffer their services as independent contractors. According to Ryan Coonerty and Jeremy Neuner, the authors of the new book “The Rise of the Naked Economy”— they are also the founders of Santa Cruz's NextSpace—the loss of traditional workplace infrastructures can feel a lot like being caught in your birthday suit, totally naked and vulnerable.

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Special Publications

Santa Cruz Visitor Guide '13

Santa Cruz Visitor Guide '13

Not to toot our own horn, but Santa Cruz County has got it all. From superb wines, to world renowned attractions, to pristine beaches, to a hip art scene, locals know how to work hard and play hard. What does that mean for visitors? Oodles of fun.

To help you navigate all that our area has to offer, we present our annual Visitor Guide. Within the following pages, you’ll find some of the best local culinary hotspots, spas, hikes, galleries, bars, live music venues, attractions, and so much more. For some insight into the area’s unique (and quirky) history, take note of the “Fun Facts” dispersed throughout.

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Cover Stories

Budding Artist

Budding Artist

‘High art’ takes on new meaning in ‘Weed Museum,’ a pictorial tribute to Santa Cruz’s favorite plant.

At the beginning of this month, comedian Bill Maher succinctly summed up the issue of marijuana prohibition. “Pot is the new gay marriage,” he proclaimed. “And by that, I mean it’s the next obvious civil rights issue that needs to fall.” Maher went on to say, “Gay barriers fell when Americans realized gays were their neighbors, their friends, their family members, their co-workers. Certainly, that must also be true of potheads.”

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Cover Stories

Silent Dilemma

Silent Dilemma

An inside look at body image and eating disorders. PLUS: Why ‘fat’ is not a feeling.

My earliest memory of “feeling fat” was when I was about 12 years old. Up until that time, I was not all that aware of having a body; I was pretty much just in my body, doing the things that kids do. I had not yet learned that I was supposed to look differently than I did. I had not yet downloaded the program that some foods were “good” and others were “bad.” I did not yet have exercise and movement linked up with calorie burning or self-worth.

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Cover Stories

CYNDI

CYNDI

On the eve of Cyndi Lauper’s Mountain Winery gig, we dissect the woman, the icon, the creative beast. Plus: Her thoughts on the music industry, equal rights and those sparkling ‘Kinky Boots’

Few performers possess the kind of fierce, she-bopping tenacity Cyndi Lauper has become famous for. Equal parts free spirit, civil rights activist and Grammy-winner, Lauper is one of the few creative artists able to successfully marry her cutting-edge verve with a heart-of-gold panache. It certainly has helped fuel the remarkable career resurgence she has been experiencing lately.

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Cover Stories

The Plug Bug & Corbin Dunn

The Plug Bug & Corbin Dunn

Mechanic, programmer, acrobat, builder, tinkerer.

Corbin Dunn's 1969 Volkswagen Beetle is a fully electric vehicle. It has an electric motor powered by 48 stacked squares of Lithium-ion battery cells under the hood in place of the 50 horsepower gas engine that it was built with. He calls it, affectionately, “the Plug Bug.”

Dunn, who was born in Hawaii, raised in Corralitos, and now lives in a large, old A-frame house near the summit in the Santa Cruz Mountains, is a 35-year-old programmer for Apple in Cupertino, where he helped develop the iPhone and works on the framework for the Macintosh operating system. But his aptitude for intricate technical work is not limited to computers. Dunn is a tinkerer.

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Special Publications

GT Active

GT Active

Welcome ... Now, Get Out!
Three’s a charm for GT Active. In our third year of Good Times Weekly’s annual magazine, we salute the great outdoors in Santa Cruz County and also take a deeper look into the area’s fitness and health scenes. What thrilled us the most, however, was giving away several tickets to a lucky local who had the opportunity to experience a one-of-a-kind helicopter ride over our lush county and ocean, only to be set down at Talbott Vineyards nearby for a wine tasting. Fun. See page 56 for the full report on that. Also, take note of our center spread, featuring the best pictures of the year from Santa Cruz Waves. In the meantime, as you peruse this year’s publication, hopefully you will be reminded of how much there is to do here—not just in the great outdoors but in your ever-evolving exploration of health and fitness, too. Onward we go ... | Greg Archer, Editor

View GT Active as PDF >

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Cover Stories

Out on a Limb

Out on a Limb

From unique children’s playhouses to full-fledged homes, we take a look at impressive treehouses that call Santa Cruz County trees home

On a recent evening, after a wrong turn led to a precarious drive up a bumpy, rock-strewn dirt road, I arrived at the idyllic Corralitos property of Mary Jane Renz.

Catty-cornered from a traditional red and white barn and past a chicken coop was the trailhead that would lead me to my destination: the family’s cozy studio, which happens to be a dozen feet off the ground and supported by three second-growth redwoods.

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Cover Stories

Free Angela

Free Angela

Political activist and UC Santa Cruz Professor Emerita Angela Davis commands the spotlight in a riveting new documentary.

PLUS:  UCSC’s Bettina Aptheker opens up about the political upheavals of the ’60s and ’70s—and today.

Angela Davis is not a human being who can be easily summed up in several sentences or paragraphs—books maybe, but, even then, capturing the political activist, scholar and author in the most comprehensive light is downright complex. That’s because Davis is an undeniably unique political creature, one who should be seen and heard to be fully absorbed and downloaded. Which is what makes Free Angela and All Political Prisoners, the new documentary about Davis and the turbulent political upheavals she faced during the late-1960s and ’70s, so inviting. In it, filmmaker Shola Lynch marks the 40th anniversary of Davis’ acquittal on charges of murder, kidnapping and conspiracy with a historical vérité style of filmmaking to illuminate a side of Davis few may have seen (or can recall), and captures the events that thrust the woman into one of the most fascinating orbits of notoriety and political intrigue of the 20th century.

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Cover Stories

Beck to the Future

Beck to the Future

In celebration of Beck’s solo acoustic show at The Rio, GT explores Song Reader, the alternative rock icon’s most ambitious interactive art piece yet.

Here’s an odd little paradox of the digital revolution: The more sophisticated our technology gets, the more our musical milieu begins to resemble that of a bygone era, when song ideas were passed around from musician to musician, perpetually taking on new twists. Dozens of different YouTube users might try their hand at setting somebody’s rant about cats or double rainbows to music, or you might hear the Belgian musician Gotye turning the many and varied covers of his song “Somebody That I Used to Know” into a virtual orchestra (see below).

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Cover Stories

Spirit Weavers

Spirit Weavers

More than 200 years ago, Santa Cruz was inhabited by peoples who had lived here for millennia. They spoke a different language, called Awaswas, and they called the place Aulinta. The coming of Mission Santa Cruz in 1791 nearly destroyed them. In an excerpt from his forthcoming book, “Santa Cruz Is in the Heart—Volume II,” Geoffrey Dunn explores their culture, their near genocide, and the tenacity of their human spirit.

It was in 1890 that an aging and articulate gentleman—identified as “a Mission Indian” from Santa Cruz named Lorenzo Asisara—consented to an interview for Edward Sanford Harrison’s “History of Santa Cruz County,” scheduled to be published in 1892, just in time for the 400th anniversary of Columbus’ “discovery” of America. Asisara’s interview was something of an anomaly in Harrison’s expensively gilded and leather-bound volume that generally celebrated the “prominent” rung of Santa Cruz County society and culture. 

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Page 15 of 42

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The Binding of Edmund McMillen

How a Santa Cruz designer created one of the most unlikely hits in video game history

 

Sun in Leo, Rosy Star, Venus and Uranus Retrograde

Three major celestial events occur this week. Wednesday, the Sun enters Leo, highlighting the heart center of everyone. Leo is a sign of deep sensitivity (along with Cancer). Wednesday is also the feast day of St. Mary Magdalene, one of the most misunderstood women in the Bible. Saturday, July 25, Venus turns stationary retrograde at 0 Virgo (progressed Regulus, the Law, Hall of Records). Venus retrogrades for 44 days and nights, forming one petal of a five-pointed rosy star (pentagram) in the sky (five retrogrades over eight years = star). Venus retrograde turns values upside down. Our usual sense of beauty, values, the real price of things, relationships—all turn into a bundle of confusion. We don’t seem to know anything. Luxury goods are mispriced, values are jumbled, we wonder who that person is we’re in relationship with. We don’t know where our money is or where it’s gone. Venus, in daily life, represents values (resources, money, possessions and quality of relationships). Venus retrograde asks, “What do I value?” Venus retrograde puts us in touch with what has changed and what is truly of value in our lives. Venus retrogrades from 0 Virgo to 14 degrees Leo (July 25-Sept. 6). Leo is about the self and our creativity, which is how we come to know and value ourselves. We “know ourselves through what we create.” In Venus (values) retrograde (inner focus) we will ask, “What are values (not just money and finances)? What are my values? What do I create? How do I value my creations? Do I value myself?” Sunday, Uranus—planet of all things new, revelatory and revolutionary—also retrogrades (from 20 to 16 degrees Aries) until the full moon of Christmas Day. Five months of Uranus retrograde. In July and continuing on through the following months we have many planets retrograding. Things therefore slow down. Everyone’s focus becomes subjective, hidden by veils and curtains. A time when inner reserves of strength are available. A time of protection.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of July 24

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Latest Comments

 

AJ’s Market

Local cult fave keeps getting bigger and better

 

What do you think of Bernie Sanders?

He’s what we need, more hardcore Democrats. Old-school, ’70s-style Democrats. Tony Dolan, Santa Cruz, Freelancer

 

Hunter Hill Vineyards & Winery

Calling all Merlot lovers—Hunter Hill has released its 2013 estate Merlot ($25)—and a superb one it is, too.

 

Turn Up the Beet

Golden beets with buffalo mozzarella, plus single-malt whiskies and award-winning local Chardonnays