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Apr 24th
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Cover Stories

Cover Stories

Mountains Were Here

Mountains Were Here

Mountaintop Removal is considered to be one of the country’s worst ongoing environmental calamities.

Local artists/filmmakers Beth Stephens and Annie Sprinkle shed light on the issue in their revealing new documentary  ‘Goodbye Gauley Mountain.’

PLUS: Why ecosexuality is on the rise.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, one of the most revered American essayists and lecturers and the man at the helm of the Transcendentalist Movement of the mid-19th Century, was reportedly fond of the Appalachian Mountains. In fact, he once mused: “Here among the mountains the pinions of thought should be strong, and one should see the errors of men from a calmer height of love and wisdom.”

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Cover Stories

Saving Paradise

Saving Paradise

Local scientists help the remote atoll of Ulithi restore its marine habitat

Many of the male parrotfish fish found in the Ulithi atoll were once female.

They are among several species in the coral reef-ringed waters that are sequential hermaphrodites, meaning they change sex during their lifetime.

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Cover Stories

Infected

Infected

Local experts weigh in on zombies, their recent surge in popularity, and the possibility of a zombie apocalypse

They’ve risen from the dead, they crave human flesh, and in the last few years, they’ve come to dominate popular culture. Welcome to zombie mania.

The first real zombie movie, George A. Romero’s Night of the Living Dead was released in 1968. Since then, zombies have appeared in numerous books, films and television shows—from Dawn of the Dead (1978) to 28 Days Later (2002) to Shaun of the Dead (2004) to Zombieland (2009) to Seth Grahame-Smith’s novel “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies” (2009) to World War Z (2013) to AMC’s ever-popular hit show The Walking Dead, which just began its fourth season on Oct. 13.

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Cover Stories

GLOW

GLOW

The Festival of fire and Light gears up for round two at the Museum of Art & History

We found the seven-headed dragon we were looking for, which I'd promised a skeptical friend I could show her if she came along for the ride, tucked away in an industrial Westside warehouse called “Rowe Machinery.”

Banking on her reluctance to believe in the existence of a Santa Cruz-based, fire-breathing dragon with multiple heads, I wagered my companion a pint of beer.

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Special Publications

Dilated Pupil Student Guide

Dilated Pupil Student Guide

Whether you’re starting out the new school year a little fish in a big pond, or the big man/woman on campus, everyone could use a little help along the way. That’s what Dilated Pupil is all about. In need of a quiet spot to study? Or how about a hip local restaurant to take your crush? Or maybe, without mom around, your clothes are in serious need of a good washing ... whatever it is you’re looking for, Good Times has you covered.

 

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Cover Stories

George Ow’s Chinatown

George Ow’s Chinatown

An excerpt from ‘Santa Cruz is in the Heart Vol. II’

In the spring when the willows and chickens grew fat again and the plum trees blossomed pink and white in the Chinatown yards near the river, the old man with the scruffy beard and tobacco breath sat back in the quiet splendor of the warm April sun and watched with great delight the group of young children playing at his feet.

Far off in the distance, he could hear the children’s grandmother, Gue Shee Lee, turning over the soil of her garden, and the San Lorenzo River tumbling gently through the town. He could smell the fish drying on the porches and the herbs from the kitchens and the faint, sweet wisps of Chinese tobacco in the air. The world had changed many times in his life he thought, as he watched the scene unfolding before him, and it would change many times more before he was gone.

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Cover Stories

Courage Under Bombs

Courage Under Bombs

One family's mind-bending journey to survive war is captured in candid email exchanges between a Santa Cruzan and a Syrian woman. A GT exclusive.

The last time Santa Cruz’s June Magnaldi visited Syria in 2011, she sat comfortably with her friends sipping tea on the balcony of their second-floor apartment, overlooking a small city street of Homs, the third-largest city in the country. Nearby, a tall green cypress tree reached toward the sky above the neighborhood of Christians and Muslims. June exchanged stories with Suha, a university graduate of literary studies who had become a teacher and whose family ties to Syria go back 1,000 years. The two friends recalled the time they had met 10 years before at Mar Musa Monastery, deep in the silent Syrian desert. June had ventured there to visit, “this beautiful monastery above the desert, open to all faiths and nationalities.” Suha told GT that Mar Musa is “heaven on Earth” and she had gone there “to be away from the city’s moral and actual pollution. I spent three days there and most of the time was with June.”

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Cover Stories

Let Them Eat Fashion

Let Them Eat Fashion

Fashion and art merge together in one of the most festive artistic events of the season.

Behold: FashionArt Santa Cruz 2013.

The definition of strut: “To display in order to impress others.”

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Cover Stories

Blasphemy

Blasphemy

…And Other esoteric Musings Await in our Big, Luscious Fall Lit Preview, Featuring Award Winner Sherman Alexie

+ The Six Books (and authors) That Top Our Must-Read List This Season

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Cover Stories

Gangaji

Gangaji

In GT’s Living Legends series, one of the most revered spiritual teachers on the planet opens up about self-inquiry and much more. PLUS: The impetus behind her return to Santa Cruz after 20 years.

Stop for a moment; notice what you’re thinking. Where do thoughts come from? What is present when there are no thoughts? This direct questioning is called self-inquiry. It’s an ancient and profound action that, according to many spiritual leaders, brings us in direct contact with what is rather than clinging to concepts that represent what is.

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Cover Stories

Finding Freedom in Prison

Finding Freedom in Prison

From despair to hope. An inside look at the local men whose sea-changing efforts offer prisoners a voice and an opportunity to make significant personal transformations.

The facts are staggering. Between 1982 and 2000, California’s prison population grew by 500 percent, according to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR). The CDCR spends almost $11 billion annually, funding 70,000 employees to oversee and supervise inmates at 33 state prisons at an average cost of $49,000 per prisoner. No other country incarcerates a higher percentage of its population than the United States. Equally disconcerting is that within the gray walls of these monolithic structures, the voices, stories and rights of prisoners are rarely heard or acknowledged.

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Best of Santa Cruz County 2014

The 2014 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll Come on in, and have a look around. There’s a lot to see—hundreds of winners selected by thousands of GT readers across Santa Cruz County. So if some of this looks familiar, it’s probably because you helped make it happen. But there are always new things to discover, too—you could go to a different winner or runner-up every day in the Food and Drink category alone, and you’d be booked just about until next year’s Best of Santa Cruz County issue comes out.

 

Something Essential Disappears

Lunar and solar eclipses follow one another. Lunar eclipses occur at full moons, and solar eclipses at new moons. Two weeks ago at the full moon we had the blood red moon—a total lunar eclipse (the next one is Oct. 8). On Monday night, April 28 (new moon), as the Sun, Moon and Earth align, a solar eclipse (Sun obscured) occurs. Eclipses signify something irrevocably is changed in our world. The Sun is our essential life force. Monday’s new moon, 9 degrees Taurus, is also an annular solar eclipse when the Moon moves centrally in front of the Sun, yet does not cover the Sun completely. The Sun's outer edges, still visible, form a “ring of fire” around the Moon.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 24

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Palate-Stretching 101

A wine education with Soif’s experts As a veteran of many weekend wine “seminars” at Soif, I have to confess that I’ve never known less (going in) and learned more (coming out) than I did last week at the Spanish Wine Tasting with ace rep Brian Greenwood. These are classy, casual events and it’s hard to imagine having this much flavor fun anywhere for $20.

 

Martin Ranch Winery

Sauvignon Blanc 2011 One of my favorite wines is Sauvignon Blanc, and this one made by Martin Ranch is particularly lovely. Bright, crisp and refreshing, it’s perfect to pair with fish and shellfish—and good for picnics as it has an easy screw-cap bottle. There’s nothing worse than setting down your blanket, pulling out your sandwiches—and then realizing you don’t have a corkscrew.

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management