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Jun 30th
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Film

Reviews and Times

Sweet Mystery of Life

Sweet Mystery of Life

Malick's 'Tree of Life' an uneven, yet visionary original

Don't expect linear storytelling from Terrence Malick. His rapturous last film, The New World, plunged viewers into first contact between English Puritan colonists and native American peoples without a road map, or a translator, or any idea on either side of the customs and culture of the other. Audiences who expected conventional storytelling were dumbfounded; there was no way in except to surrender to the strangeness—as the colonists and tribespeople themselves must have perceived it—and let the experience wash over you.

Malick's new film, The Tree of Life plunges us into more familiar  terrain—growing up in suburban Middle America in the second half of the 20th century—and turns it into something strange and mysterious, a metaphor for the eternal search for grace and meaning in life.

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Reviews and Times

‘Super 8’: Super Great

‘Super 8’: Super Great

J.J. Abrams delivers a powerfully engaging outing

If Stand By Me met a much more modern—if not fierce—E.T. it would resemble something like Super 8. This wildly exciting new film is cleverly written and masterfully directed by J.J. Abrams and it’s one you’re apt to remember for quite some time.

Abrams, you may recall, was responsible for rebooting the Star Trek film franchise a few years back—although whatever happened with that idea is still a mystery—as well as delivering a fascinating turn in the heartpounding Cloverfield. And let’s not forget all the fun he fueled into TV offerings like Alias, Fringe, Lost. But with Super 8, which has Steven Spielberg’s producer stamp on it, Abrams delivers a real surprise: a genuine summer movie event that hearkens back to the days when there actually were, well, summer movies you gave a damn about.

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Reviews and Times

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 16th

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 16th

Films This Week
Check out the movies playing around town.
With reviews and trailers.

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Reviews and Times

Past Present

Past Present

Modern writer time-travels to Jazz Age Paris in funny, fabulous 'Midnight In Paris'

From the fabulous poster art to a sweet little epiphany in the last frame, there is nothing not to love in Woody Allen's latest, Midnight In Paris. In the poster, star Owen Wilson is sauntering alongside the River Seine at night, while the extravagant blues and blazing, swirling lights of Van Gogh's "Starry Night" explode across the sky above the ancient buildings lining the bank. This single image says everything about the art, history, enduring fantasy, and cultural allure of Paris, issues Allen addresses with such savvy brio in this marvelously inventive film.

Wilson is all light, easygoing charm as American in Paris, Gil Pender. A typical Allen surrogate (garbed in Woody's traditional light blue shirt and khaki pants), Gil is a successful Hollywood screenwriter who longs to chuck it all and write serious fiction—preferably in a romantic garret in Paris.

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Reviews and Times

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 9th

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 9th

Films This Week
Check out the movies playing around town.
With reviews and trailers.

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Reviews and Times

Burning Woman

Burning Woman

'Incendies' an epic tragedy of love, war, and forgiveness

s one character observes late in the film, Incendies, "One spark sets everything off." And so it does, in this searing family drama from French-Canadian filmmaker Denis Villeneuve, an epic Greek tragedy of a film that's not for the fainthearted. Adapted from the internationally acclaimed stage play by Lebanese-born writer-actor-director Wajdi Mouawad, it examines the relentless cycles of violence and reprisals in the Middle East (and everywhere else)  from a uniquely personal viewpoint that's both powerful and horrifying. This is a film one admires after the fact for the strength of its vision, but it's a harrowing thing to sit through.

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Reviews and Times

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 2nd

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 2nd

Films This Week
Check out the movies playing around town.
With reviews and trailers.

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Reviews and Times

Old Masters

Old Masters

Stunning prehistoric art highlights 'Cave of Forgotten Dreams'

Werner Herzog explores two of his favorite themes in his stunning new documentary, Cave of Forgotten Dreams: human obsessions, and the forbidding grandeur of Nature. Understand, the film itself is not all that exceptional; some crucial factual details apparently don't interest Herzog enough to include them, and we are treated to some of the director's offbeat ruminations that prove more bewildering than profound. However, the subject of the film is stunning, a recently discovered, 30,000-year-old cave buried under a massive rockslide in rural France that contains the earliest known wall paintings made by human hands.

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Reviews and Times

Film, Times & Events: Week of May 26th

Film, Times & Events: Week of May 26th

Films This Week
Check out the movies playing around town.
With reviews and trailers.

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Reviews and Times

Brand On The Run

Brand On The Run

Cheeky Spurlock doc not quite 'Greatest Movie Ever Sold'

Morgan Spurlock had an interesting concept for the movie that has become POM Wonderful Presents; The Greatest Movie Ever Sold. The documentary filmmaker whose popular Super Size Me established both Spurlock himself and his particular genre of stunt-activist films as a brand unto itself decided this time to explore the shadow world of what was once called "product placement"—the system by which corporations pay to have their products displayed onscreen in films and TV shows.

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I Was a Teenage Deadhead

Memories of life on tour, plus the truth about that legendary Santa Cruz Acid Test

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

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Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Open Wide

Soif’s soft reboot leads to expanded menu, plus the ‘thinking woman’s ketchup’