Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Oct 31st
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Film

Reviews and Times

Hot Stuff

Hot Stuff

Larsson's 'Girl Who Played With Fire' makes an incendiary thriller
There's good news for fans of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. The two protagonists in that film (played by the same terrific actors) return in the sequel, The Girl Who Played With Fire, the second Swedish film adapted from the international bestselling crime suspense trilogy by the late Swedish author Stieg Larsson. But those expecting the kind of conventional buddy-buddy sleuthing arrangement found in most mystery franchises will be surprised. While both characters are drawn into the same investigation this time, they never dare to team up—the stakes are too high.

Read more...
Reviews and Times

I Am Love

I Am Love

In her long, illustrious career in independent film, Tilda Swinton's roles have ranged from the sublime (Orlando) to the ridiculous (Female Perversions). There are elements of both in her new film, I Am Love, a langorous Italian family drama she also co-produced; gorgeous location shooting in Milan and the San Remo countryside, and rapturous depictions of food, border on sublimity, but the overheated melodrama of the storytelling finally skews the film in the other direction. Co-scripted and directed by Luca Guadagnino, the film stars Swinton as Emma Recchi, a Russian-born wife in a wealthy Milanese family, whose businessman husband, Tancredi (Pippo Delbono) is about to inherit the family textile manufacturing business from his own elderly father.

Read more...
Reviews and Times

Movies & Film Events: Week of July 15

Movies & Film Events: Week of July 15

Films This Week
Check out the movies playing around town.
With reviews and trailers.

 

Read more...
Reviews and Times

A Rivers Runs Through It, Plus Joan Q&A

A Rivers Runs Through It, Plus Joan Q&A

Comic confronts showbiz highs and lows in candid 'Joan Rivers' doc
It's like watching them build the Pyramids, or Stonehenge. The construction of Joan Rivers' face is a little flash-documentary unto itself, a fascinating vignette that leads off the candid backstage documentary feature, Joan Rivers: A Piece Of Work. An army of staffpersons wielding an army of tools—brushes, tubes, paint, pencils, eyelash applicators—daub, pat, draw and shape the familiar mask that is Rivers' surgically tautened face into being. It's all done in extreme close-up—an eyebrow, a lip, an eyelash—until the whole is complete. And of course, there is no “before” image. Not surprising for a woman whose very first stop out of bed every morning is the make-up chair, before she can catch an unwary glimpse of what lies beneath the mask.

Read more...
Reviews and Times

Movies & Film Events: Week of July 8

Movies & Film Events: Week of July 8

Films This Week
Check out the movies playing around town.
With reviews and trailers.

 

Read more...
Reviews and Times

Son Burned

Son Burned

Grown son meddles in Mom's romance in engaging 'Cyrus'
It's a familiar enough premise in the movies: boy meets girl, boy and girl click, then boy has to cope with girl's parents/children/ family (pick one). But filmmaking brothers Jay and Mark Duplass throw in a few fresh insights in their thoughtful comedy, Cyrus. The intrepid couple trying out a new romance are a seasoned man and woman in their 40s, and the "child" who threatens to come between them is a 22-year-old slacker determined to remain the single focus of his mom's attention.

If this were a movie with Will Ferrell, say, or Ben Stiller, crazy comedy would ensue. The males would draw their lines in the sand and engage in ever more frenetic games of one-upsmanship, while soft-soaping the woman both want. The Duplasses flirt with this idea for a while, it surfaces now and then in the plot. But by keeping their characters and the narrative absolutely life-sized and credible, the filmmakers humanize the story in a way Hollywood comedies never even try to do. The result is a heartfelt, engaging comedy that draws us in like a thriller; the characters are so believable, we can't wait to find out how (or if) they’ll resolve their problem.

Read more...
Reviews and Times

Toy Story 3

Toy Story 3

What other movie franchise can take an 11-year hiatus and come back with the same cast, as fresh, funny, and irresistible as ever? Who else but the gang from Andy's room, the lovable toy heroes of the mighty Toy Story series that catapulted a hip little animation studio called Pixar onto the Hollywood A-list. Toy Story 3 reunites the whole gang, and not just to exploit the new 3-D technology. In TS3, the passage of time is a subtext in a typically whimsical, hilarious, and poignant adventure that celebrates the magical world of a child's imagination, and ponders the inevitability of growing up. The brilliant opening sequence re-introduces all the familiar toys in a thrilling chase scenario (a runaway train full of orphans; a giant pig-shaped alien spaceship) that turns out to be playing inside the head of little Andy, crawling around with his toys in an old home movie. But now Andy is packing up to go to college, and his toys—cowboy Woody (Tom Hanks), spaceman Buzz (Tim Allen), cowgirl Jessie (Joan Cusack), and the rest—spend most of their time in the toy box.

Read more...
Reviews and Times

Movies & Film Events: Week of July 1

Movies & Film Events: Week of July 1

Films This Week
Check out the movies playing around town.
With reviews and trailers.

 

Read more...
Reviews and Times

True Grit

True Grit

Girl vs. chaotic world in taut Southern Gothic noir 'Winter's Bone'
It's always something, as Gilda Radner used to say. It certainly is  in the relentless narrative of Winter's Bone, a nerve-rattling exercise in dread and redemption that knocked the bejeebers out of critics and audiences alike at this year's Sundance festival. (It won the Grand Jury Prize for Best Picture, as well as the Best Screenplay award.) Directed with grit and assurance by Debra Granik, this Southern Gothic noir thriller is taut, scary, more than a little creepy, and strangely poignant. It's a bracing alternative to the bloated franchises, inane comedies, and action extravaganzas of the summer movie season.

Read more...
Reviews and Times

Solitary Man

Solitary Man

The old Neil Diamond song about a good guy who can't find a faithful woman is an odd choice for the title of this film (it's sung by Johnny Cash over the opening credits). This movie's male protagonist is the exact opposite, a prowling horndog who's inability to keep it in his pants destroys every relationship in his life. Maybe co-directors Brian Koppelman and David Levien didn't listen to the lyrics, or maybe it's just another colossal miscalculation in this highly preposterous and unpleasant film. Michael Douglas stars as Ben Kalmen, once a powerhouse New York City car dealer. But philandering has cost him his ex-wife and business partner (Susan Sarandon), a fraud conviction makes it impossible to get financing for a new dealership, and now that he's pushing 60, he's a slave to his wandering libido, deluding himself that his compulsive sexual conquests will stave off the ravages of time.

Read more...
 
Page 50 of 68

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Jawing

Monterey Bay scientists are working to crack the mysteries of—and dispel the myths about—great whites. But in the highly contentious world of shark experts, there’s a fin line between love and hate

 

Altars of Remembrance, Forgiveness & Rapprochement

We’re in Scorpio now—things mysterious, ageless, hidden, sometimes scary. Friday is Halloween; Saturday, All Saints Day; Sunday, All Soul’s Day. Sunday morning at 2 a.m. (after midnight), Daylight Savings Time ends. Clocks are turned back. Tuesday is the General Election. Our vote is our voice. Each vote matters. Applying freedom of choice—Libra’s teachings. It’s time to build Halloween, All Saints and All Souls altars—with marigolds, pumpkins, sugar skeletons, copal (incense), pomegranates, persimmons, candy corn and cookies, orange and black. It’s so Saturn (now in Scorpio). Saturn is the dweller on the threshold (like St. Peter at the gates of heaven). Saturn can look like a Halloween creature—a gargoyle—a fantastic dragon-like creature protecting sacred sites. The dweller (Saturn) stands at the door or threshold of sacred mysteries, wisdom temples, inner sanctums of churches, offering protection, scaring evil away. The last day of October and first two days of November, when veils between worlds thin and spirits roam about, are times of remembrance, forgiveness, reconciliation and rapprochement. These actions liberate us. At death, when reviewing our lives and the consequences of our actions if we have forgiven, then we are free, less encumbered with grief and sadness. We place forgiveness on our altars. Happy Halloween, everyone! It’s good to dress up as what we’re afraid of. Or whom we would mentor. Then we become one with them. Note to readers: by Thanksgiving I will need a place to live (with purpose). Please contact me if you know of a place where I can rest for awhile. Teach and build community. [email protected] I will be leaving my mother’s home for the last time.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of October 31

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Back Nine Grill & Bar

The secrets of remodeling and juicy steak

 

What is Santa Cruz’s biggest eyesore?

David Finn, Santa Cruz, Graduate Student

 

Alberti Vineyards

Looking for some blood-red wine for your Halloween party? Then I have a recommendation for a new brew.

 

Turning Point

New revolving restaurant on the wharf, plus Cafe Ivéta and the last great Jack cheese