Santa Cruz Good Times

Thursday
Apr 17th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Pitch Perfect

music Sing4YourLifeGold Standard Chorus supports youth music programs with annual concert benefit

It’s actually pretty miraculous what they pull off,” says Alice Hughes, choir teacher and Visual & Performing Arts Chair at Pacific Collegiate School, regarding “Sing For Your Life,” the annual concert benefit put on by the Gold Standard Barbershop Chorus. “And the fact that they’re doing it out of their love for music and a desire to keep music strong in schools—the kids really recognize and appreciate that.”

For the last 10 years, the 20-plus members of Gold Standard have demonstrated their unfaltering support for local choral music programs through the event, which kicks off on Sunday, Nov. 4. The purpose of “Sing For Your Life” is to expose the community to barbershop harmony and other forms of vocal music, and, most importantly, to raise funds for local high schools.

From its modest start with a single high school choir, the benefit has grown to encompass performances by 10 choirs—a total of about 350 students—and has been split into a matinee and an evening show, both held at The Civic Auditorium. This year’s participants include Santa Cruz, Scotts Valley, Soquel, and Aptos high schools (to name a few), along with a guest quartet, The B-Sides.

“It’s really neat getting to go to the schools after the benefit to give them the checks for the funds they earned through ‘Sing For Your Life,’” notes Jordan Johnson, director of Gold Standard. “Mostly because I know it will support their programs, and allow them to do things they wouldn’t have been able to do otherwise.”

Since its inception, “Sing For Your Life” has raised a total of $58,000, one hundred percent of which went directly back to the school choir programs.

Hughes’ choir at Pacific Collegiate has been involved in the benefit for the past six years. They have found that the funds garnered at “Sing For Your Life” make a tremendous difference each year—whether they’re used to purchase new choral music, pay off the royalties to perform certain pieces of music, or otherwise.

“We use the funds to cover the cost of an accompanist, occasionally to buy new uniforms, and especially to alleviate expenses from traveling. It helps cover costs so that every student can participate without having to pay too much out of pocket,” explains Hughes. Plus, “[the students] get to see firsthand that what they work on makes a difference, and that they are part of a larger whole—this event really facilitates that.”

Each participating school receives funds based on the number of tickets they sell to the event. “We have the students only sell tickets,” says Nick Roberto, president of Gold Standard and a former “Sing For Your Life” participant. “We try to take the brunt of the money raising, we don’t want to impose anything on the choirs or their teachers.”

Consequently, it is the members of Gold Standard that seek out sponsors to cover the costs of renting The Civic, buying the music for the grand finale, printing tickets, and anything else required to put on the performance. In years when sponsors don’t cover all of the expenses, Gold Standard members have been known to pay for certain aspects of the production from their personal funds.

“Moving to The Civic really raised the bar, not only in terms of what caliber of show we could put on, but also what we need to do in order to put it on,” explains Johnson. “We’re still a really small organization; right now we are a group of about 20. Realistically if we want to put on productions of this scale every year we need to be something like 50.”

That’s why in addition to helping support local schools, Gold Standard uses “Sing For Your Life” as an opportunity to spread the word about their group and (hopefully) recruit more members. At the end of the day, it’s all about keeping music alive.

“All I can hope is for audience members to walk away saying, ‘Wow, that was incredible, maybe I can do that too,’” says Johnson. “It’s not just a message for the kids in the choir, it’s for everybody in the community, that you can sing too. There’s nothing magical about it, you can learn it, and there are people like us who will help you develop it.” 


“Sing For Your Life” takes place at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 4, at The Civic Auditorium, 307 Church St., Santa Cruz. Tickets are $15/adv, $20/door. For ticket information, call 218-1771, or visit www.santacruztickets.com.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
  • Login
    Login with registered email or username + password
  • Create an account
    Registration
    *
    *
    *
    *
    *
    REGISTER_REQUIRED
  • Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
    Upcoming arts & events

    RSS Feed Burner

     Subscribe in a reader

    Latest Comments

     

    Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

    Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

     

    How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

    I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

     

    Best of Santa Cruz County

    The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

     

    Trout Gulch Vineyards

    Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.