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Oct 02nd
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Features

Anchormen

Anchormen

STS9 proves you don’t need words to make a statement

Noam Chomsky is down with electronica. OK, so you might not see the revered scholar waving a glow stick at a Sound Tribe Sector 9 show anytime soon, but you will see him collaborating with our hometown boys in an upcoming documentary. That’s because STS9 walks the walk. Virtually all sound and no talk, the local 5-piece-gone-big, infamous for elaborate orchestrations of instrumental jam band rock with tech-savvy electronica, is all about getting the word out and giving back.

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Features

A River Runs Through Him

A River Runs Through Him

The seasoned folk icon Greg Brown tells it like it is

Greg Brown has got grit. Symbolized by his trademark coarse vocals, that sentiment holds true in how he’s become an underground icon without the commercial success.

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Features

Rebel With A Cause

Rebel With A Cause

Michael Franti talks about Power To The Peaceful, performing in Iraq, wanting to dance, and Obama as President

Michael Franti is one fierce yogi. A decade ago, the dynamically outspoken muscle behind hip hop’s eclectic Spearhead started the 911 Power To The Peaceful festival—a free park concert in his native San Francisco to raise political and social awareness through peaceful activism. That first attempt drew 6,000 people. It currently draws upwards of 60,000 and now features collective yoga practices for the masses before and after the music. Coinciding with this year’s 10th Annual event, his latest album hits stands this week. For All Rebel Rockers, Franti made a concerted effort to infuse vibrant, booty shakin’ beats in his mission to uplift people through dance, after he did just that during a visit to Iraq. Though images of him are often stern and militant, in the following conversation he is humble and poignantly expressive. Preparing for PTTP and his upcoming performance in Santa Cruz on Sept. 18, Franti gives GT insights into the evolution of the festival and the protest icon’s music through his years of international experience.

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Features

I.V. League

Israel Vibration’s Lascelle “Wiss” Bulgin gives GT a shot of positive energy

I’m talking with one of the most respected reggae artists alive … and I can’t understand a word he’s saying. Between Israel Vibration vocalist Lascelle “Wiss” Bulgin’s thick Jamaican accent, a fuzzy cell phone reception, and the din of a lively entourage in the background, what we’re getting here does not resemble “information” in the conventional sense. As far as sonic Rorschach tests go, though, it’s first-rate stuff.

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Features

Working Class Hero

Social Distortion’s Mike Ness flies his country flag high on his latest solo tour

If you’re someone who only knows Mike Ness through surly Social Distortion anthems like “Ball and Chain” and “Mommy’s Little Monster,” you might be surprised to punch up this 46-year-old punk rock icon’s MySpace page and find that he describes his solo material with a single word: country. Not cowpunk, mind you, nor even rockabilly, but straight-up, truck stop-ready country music. As Ness’ stauncher fans will tell you, the man’s fondness for twang has been evident since Social D’s sophomore album, 1988’s Prison Bound, but the southern accent is all the stronger in his solo work, which casts Ness as a star-crossed troubadour in the tradition of Johnny Cash or Hank Williams. And hey, let’s face it: With his well-documented history of drug addiction, incarceration, violence and alcoholism, Ness is more than qualified to portray himself as a hard-livin’ man of constant sorrow.

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Features

“Down” with the Tao

Who knew 311’s Nick Hexum had a spiritual side?

For us MTV-generation types, it’s almost impossible to hear “Down”—the tune that propelled the Omaha rap/reggae/funk/rock group 311 to chart-dominating, triple-platinum-selling glory in the mid-’90s—without picturing the most striking image from that song’s video: the band’s members meditating at the feet of a levitating, Sumo-esque spiritual master. Unforgettable as that scene was, though, it seemed slightly at odds with the band’s urban look and aggressive sound; you had to wonder if meditation was really a part of these guys’ regimens, or if they were just a bunch of street kids wearing spirituality like a trendy henna tattoo.

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Features

Through the Past, Darkly

GT goes back to the future with former Bauhaus/Love and Rockets bassist David J

Throughout his years as bassist for the late ’70s/early ’80s English art rock band Bauhaus, David J maintained a somewhat spectral presence, shrouded in tonal murk, his eyes constantly eclipsed by a pair of shades. But when he emerged from the shadows as a member of Love and Rockets, the light of day revealed him to be one of alternative rock’s most likeable characters, sporting an alien hipness, vaguely C-3PO-ish features and an Alan Watts-like blend of wisdom and intellect. Songs like “Kundalini Express” and “No New Tale to Tell” were clearly the products of a lysergically expanded mind, but this wasn’t your mother’s psychedelia—J’s version of transcendentalism sounded not just cutting-edge, but often futuristic.
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Features

Saturday Night Fever

Deftones’ Abe Cunningham on the art of stayin’ alive

When you’ve been playing music with the same band for almost 20 years, conflict is inevitable. No one knows this better than Abe Cunningham, drummer for the platinum-selling Sacramento alternative hard rock outfit known as Deftones. Severe internal turmoil recently brought this group perilously close to flatlining—which probably explains why Cunningham sounds so fired up to be on the road with his longtime bandmates, killing some time before a gig in Chicago by telling GT about an especially inventive method the Deftones have found for settling their differences.

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Features

She Still Bops

She Still Bops
Yeah ... Cyndi Lauper just wants to have fun—and wax philosophical

It’s been more than an hour since I’ve been on the phone with singer Cyndi Lauper for more than an hour. And I’m wondering: “Am I open? Am I standing in the center of the rhythm? Am I allowing myself to be the channel for which creativity can pass through me? Is my head clear?” Lauper’s self-reflexive joi de vivre is better than therapy and definitely less expensive. In fact, the musical stormtrooper who triumphed in the ’80s with her rainbow’d tresses and the hit singles “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun,” “She Bop” and “Time After Time” is deep and real, raw and edgy, and just as outspoken as you’d imagine her to be. On the eve of her upcoming appearance at Saratoga’s Mountain Winery, Lauper, now 50, attempted to answer questions about her marriage, being a mother to her 6-year-old son, living in Connecticut, touring with Cher and last year’s debut of At Last, an array of cabaret standards and pop classics, her first major-label recording since 1998. I say attempted, because the more one gives Lauper room to speak, the more opportunity there is to listen to her reflect on life, and living, and being a human being. Somehow, all the questions get answered—just not at the moment they’re asked ...

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Features

Vine Time at The Winery

The Beats Go On At Mountain Winery

I had a Falcon Crest flashback as my friend and I drove up the scenic windy road leading us to Saratoga’s Mountain Winery last weekend. All those vines. All the grapes. All that wine. Fortunately, the only thing dramatic that night was the view—well that, and the stellar B-52’s show we experienced in the venue’s remarkable outdoor theater. And, as concerts go, this could not have been a better setting.

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Features

Pouring Rain

Music’s Dana Glover keeps getting flooded with attention. So why is she gripping a Hoover and wondering whether her clothes are folded?

Dana Glover stands off to the side of a not-at-all glossy gas station somewhere on the road to Hartford, Conn. with her finger plugging one ear, her cell phone digging into the other. She watches an 18-wheeler roar by and turns around to find her brother fueling up the car with some regular unleaded. It’s about the only “regular” thing being injected into Glover’s life at the moment, which becomes blatantly evident in the 25 minutes it takes for the North Carolina-born model-turned-up-and-rising music icon to wax philosophical about how ironic things have become—she craves slow “journeys” but can’t help but be surprised at how her music career is suddenly racing along at break-neck speed.

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Features

Belinda Carlisle: Still on the Go-Go

Belinda Carlisle: Still on the Go-Go

And, when it comes to music, her lips aren’t sealed

Vacation may have been all she’s ever wanted—from slick record industry execs that is—but now that Belinda Carlisle has nurtured the celebrity hangover of her ’80s Go-Go’s fame and has basked in the afterglow of her own smashing solo career in the ’90s, the one-time “Dottie Danger” has a lot to be jazzed about. For starters, she’s just launched a 15-city American tour, her first since the early ’90s. Carlisle hits the stage locally in Redwood City's Fox Theate, where

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On the Waterfront

As the wharf celebrates its centennial, a personal reflection on its essential place in Santa Cruz’s history

 

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, occurs this year during Libra, the sign of creating right relations with all aspects life and with earth’s kingdoms. We contemplate (the Libra meditation) forgiveness, which means, “to give for another.” Forgiveness is not pardon. It’s a sacrifice (fire in the heart, giving from the heart). Forgiveness is giving up for the good of the other. This is the law of evolution (the path of return).

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of September 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Melinda’s

New Capitola bakery takes gluten-free goods to the next level

 

Do you think you are addicted to technology?

Santa Cruz  |  Unemployed

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Apricot Wine for Dessert

Thomas Kruse Winery, a participant in the new Santa Clara Wine Trail, has been around for a long time—since 1971, to be exact. When our little group arrived to try some wine at the Kruses’ low-key tasting room, Thomas Kruse and his wife Karen were there to greet us. Theirs is a small operation, and they’re proud to offer quality wine at affordable prices. “Because we are small and low-tech, it’s easy to relate to the whole winemaking process,” says Karen—and the Kruses take pride in making wine “just like it has been made for centuries.”