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Nov 28th
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Tether Horse

music_LYLBTetherHorseWhen one door closes, another door opens. Singer Matthew Chaney can attest to that. Dropping out of school to take a hiatus from his studies as an environmental science major, the singer-songwriter dove into the music scene a year ago armed with plenty of folk songs, equally infectious as affecting, and a crew of friends to fill out his rising acoustic ensemble, Tether Horse. “The idea of dropping out of school links in with the name of the band,” Chaney explains. “It’s that whole idea of being tethered to our society’s idea of the right direction to go and that if you want to be successful you have to follow these set of rules. I wanted to do something apart from that.” At a crossroads and confronting new opportunities, the 24-year-old says he had “a bit of a freak out moment” before choosing the right-brained path to close the books and hit the stage. The result of his risk-taking? Tether Horse has been romping through houses and venues with its classic Americana twang peppered with the darker nuances of J.J. McCabe’s cello or violin, at breakneck speed. Songs often kick off with Chaney crooning in simple, soulful form, before the band segues into barroom chorusing and unbridled instrumental revelry; string interplay gets swept up in drummer Layne Lykins’ backbeats, while guitarist Connor Clark summons sturdy backup vox and bassist Christopher Sulots alternates on glockenspiel. Playing this week with the Old Canes on Friday, Nov. 20, at The Crepe Place, Tether Horse is wrapping up a 15-track album. Titled In the House that Took Me, the debut was recorded in Chaney’s childhood home in the Soquel mountains, the place where he wrote most of the songs. It was an appropriate, nostalgic makeshift studio to lay down his nostalgic folk tunes. With the CD set for release about a year after he made the choice to see where music takes him, the frontman looks back on his decision with no regrets. “I went with the way things were pushing,” Chaney begins, “and so far I’ve been happy with that.” | Linda Koffman


INFO: 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20, Crepe Place, 1134 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. $8. 429-6994.

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Good Times Holiday Giving

Giving Where It Helps

 

Giving Thanks: The Thought-Form of Solution

We are in the time and under the influence of Sagittarius, sign of the wanderer, good food, good music, and the joy (Jupiter as ruler) that occurs from giving to others while simultaneously giving thanks from our hearts. Having the Thanksgiving holiday during the month of Sag is not a mistake. No other sign understands joy (an aspect of the Soul) as Sag (except Pisces when not in despair). “Sag is a beam of directed and focused light. The beam reveals a greater light ahead, illuminating the Way to the center of the Light,” emitting the Ray of Joyfulness. Thanksgiving is a time for gratitude; in the form of prayers, thoughts, feelings, wishes, hopes and greetings. Gratitude is something we still need to learn. Gratitude creates goodwill. Together, gratitude and goodwill create the “thought-form of solution” for humanity and our world’s problems. Gratitude and goodwill are the prerequisites for the reappearance of the Christ, the Aquarian World Teacher. In Ancient Wisdom texts it is written, “being grateful is the hallmark of one who is enlightened.” Gratitude comes from the Soul—the characteristics of which are love and wisdom (Ray 2). Gratitude is scientifically and occultly (mental, not emotional) a releasing agent. Gratitude liberates us and everything around us. Also a service to others, gratitude is deeply scientific in nature, releasing us from the past and laying open our future path leading to the new culture and civilization, the new laws and principles, the rising light of Aquarian, the Age of Friendship and Equality. The Hierarchy lays much emphasis upon gratitude. Let us be grateful this year and this season together. And so now the days of light illuminating the darkness begin (December’s festivals and feast days). Happy Thanksgiving, everyone. I am grateful for all of you, my readers.

 

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