Santa Cruz Good Times

Nov 27th
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Little Sister

music lylbIt’s 8 p.m. on a Monday, and Nate Krohn, the charming frontman for rock quintet Little Sister—a six-piece, if you include his Italian-style moustache, named Giuseppe—still hasn’t done his laundry because he’s preoccupied with the band’s van. “It’s functional, but it has a fuel leak,” he says. “It might blow up.” Hardly defeated, Krohn confesses, “I just made an awesome steak though.” And therein lies the beauty of Little Sister, whose music is also characteristic of an awesome steak: flavorful, tough yet tender, and totally rare.

Krohn says it’s the group’s goal “to do straight rock ’n’ roll: heartfelt, a little bit sloppy, loud, and proud.” Little Sister formed in November of last year, when lead guitarist Alan Trybom (The Huxtables)—called “Genius,” according to Krohn, for crafting most of the band’s hooks and melodies—created the lineup. By the time Krohn was locked in, Trybom had also gathered rhythm guitarist Drew Erskine and hardcore/metal drummer John Click . The bassist slot was then filled by fervent musician Chris Kruger. Asked about the inspiration for their lyrics, Krohn—who can often be found mixing and pouring at The Rush Inn—said, “most of the words come from bar culture. They are stories told from the drinker’s perspective and people watching the drinkers; these are not dry songs. They’re going to ring a little truer with a drink in your hand, not that they wouldn’t be enjoyed by people who don’t drink.” After all, “they are mostly love songs,” says Krohn. In The Catalyst Atrium Saturday night, the band will premiere its debut EP, Here Comes Everybody. Krohn quotes the song “Something Everybody Needs,” as reason to attend: “If you have somebody/ I want you to grab somebody/ and if you love somebody/ I mean, if you really love somebody/ I want you to shove somebody.” He then adds, “If you’re not at the show, you can’t do any of that!” Hesitant about promoting violence, Krohn explains, “It’s rock ’n’ roll. It’s a little dangerous.”
INFO: 9 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 22. Catalyst Atrium, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. $5. 423-1338.

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