Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Oct 01st
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

The Mob Rules

music_GlitchMobThe Glitch Mob’s Justin Boreta lives up to his band’s name in a bug-riddled phone chat
Glitch: a minor malfunction, mishap, or technical problem. It’s a good word for the obstacles that Justin Boreta is encountering as he tries to chat with GT from the road. Frequent loss of reception is forcing Boreta, one of the three electronics fiends who comprise The Glitch Mob, to call back repeatedly to continue our interview.

“We’re always looking for new ways to improve our set,” Boreta explains. “We’ve been doing the whole laptop ksssssssss fraggen whole idea of ldbf mzrssff …”

“Hello … ? Hello? Shit.”

Guess you have to be careful what you put out there: If you name your band The Glitch Mob, you might be tempting fate—not only by inviting digital disasters, but also by encouraging people to assume that you strictly play glitch music, a sub-genre of electronica that makes heavy use of digital “accidents” such as distortion, CD skipping and system errors. Though you could be forgiven for associating Boreta and his fellow Mobsters, Ed Ma and Josh Mayer, with this style of music, Boreta is loath to pin the group’s dubstep/hip-hop/crunk sound down to any single genre.

“I don’t think we’re having a generic conversation in the same sense as a dubstep producer or a house or techno producer, where it’s very confined to a specific set of tempos, sounds and everything like that,” he insists.

When the glitch idiom rose to prominence in the late ’90s, its sounds of digital breakdown seemed to foretell the fatal skid and crash of an electronica scene mired in technological overkill. Since then, techno music has become far more human, with its creators often integrating live instrumentation with synthetic sounds. The Glitch Mob has recapitulated the genre’s evolution: Nowadays the group’s members can at various times be found playing bass, guitar and live electronic percussion onstage. “We don’t stand behind laptops anymore. We’ve removed those from the equation,” Boreta notes.

In an effort to engage with their audience more, the members of the band now play all their parts live as opposed to DJ-ing them. To this end, the group uses electronic drums and controllers designed to trigger sounds. According to Boreta, it’s no simple task to recreate The Glitch Mob’s recorded music onstage. “To have it sound like the record and still be able to fluidly play and have freedom like a regular instrument—there’s not a lot of technology out there [designed for that],” he states.

Things are far simpler in the studio, where The Glitch Mob creates its sounds by way of computer, using a Steinberg Cubase as its main sequencer. The quite satisfying results can be heard on Drink the Sea, the band’s just-released debut full-length album. Though it’s filled with all the colossal electronic drum sounds, crunchy bass and edgy, adrenaline-charged grooves that fans have come to expect from the trio, Drink the Sea also makes frequent pit stops in more ambient, space dust-sprinkled terrain.

“We conceived it as a listening album—something different from our old tracks in the past, which were more based on one-off remixes and dance floor-friendly music,” Boreta says. “This is more meant to be listened to at home on headphones from start to finish.”

The Glitch Mob plays The Catalyst on Wednesday, June 9. Though the band is based in Los Angeles, Boreta keeps an 831 area code as a souvenir from his six years as a Santa Cruz resident, during which he played his first shows as a DJ at venues like the Vets Hall and at Moontribe parties.

“It’s actually a big deal for me to come back to The Catalyst, because a lot of my formative musical experiences happened in Santa Cruz,” he says.

By all appearances, it should be a triumphant return … barring any technical difficulties, of course.

 


The Glitch Mob plays at 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 9, at The Catalyst, 1011 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. Free the Robots and Deru open this 16+ show. Tickets are $16 in advance or $19 at the door. For more information, call 423-1338.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Reflecting Glass

Composer Philip Glass’ first trip to Big Sur was by motorcycle; little did he know that he’d establish a music festival there six decades later.

 

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, occurs this year during Libra, the sign of creating right relations with all aspects life and with earth’s kingdoms. We contemplate (the Libra meditation) forgiveness, which means, “to give for another.” Forgiveness is not pardon. It’s a sacrifice (fire in the heart, giving from the heart). Forgiveness is giving up for the good of the other. This is the law of evolution (the path of return).

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of September 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Wurst Case Scenario

Venus Spirits releases agave spirit, Renee Shepherd on planting garlic, Sausagefest 2014, and wine harvest in full swing

 

Do you think you are addicted to technology?

Santa Cruz  |  Unemployed

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Apricot Wine for Dessert

Thomas Kruse Winery, a participant in the new Santa Clara Wine Trail, has been around for a long time—since 1971, to be exact. When our little group arrived to try some wine at the Kruses’ low-key tasting room, Thomas Kruse and his wife Karen were there to greet us. Theirs is a small operation, and they’re proud to offer quality wine at affordable prices. “Because we are small and low-tech, it’s easy to relate to the whole winemaking process,” says Karen—and the Kruses take pride in making wine “just like it has been made for centuries.”