Santa Cruz Good Times

Tuesday
Aug 04th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Sound Gardener

music_BluetechBluetech welcomes Don Quixote’s patrons to his sonic greenhouse
When Evan Bartholomew composes a song, he begins with what he calls “a tiny seed.” “I’m silent for a minute, and I hear … maybe it’s a bass line; maybe it’s a rhythm pattern; maybe it’s something my hand is tapping on the steering wheel while I’m driving in the car,” he explains. “And then I go in the studio and attempt to sow the seed—get it down, get that idea tracked.”

It’s fitting that Bartholomew—who performs his downtempo electronica music under the name of Bluetech—should reach for this particular metaphor: His home recording studio in Hawaii is filled with literal seedlings. The musician has a nursery of more than 2,000 bromeliads, a type of epiphyte (a plant that can grow without soil) found in the tropical Americas. Because the habitat for the plants he collects is being rapidly decimated, some of these species no longer exist in the wild. He hopes to use his music to draw attention to this situation.

“I would like for people to experience the music and have that sense of wonder—to realize that I’m translating something that I’m experiencing working with the natural world,” he offers. “Maybe it will help create a love and a passion in my generation for saving some of these species and habitat and the natural beauty that surrounds us.”

Bartholomew’s latest project, Invisible Allies, finds him collaborating with electronic musician KiloWatts (a.k.a. James Watts). The group’s virgin release is Hyperdimensional Animals, an EP consisting of five new songs and five remixes. On Thursday, Dec. 30 at Don Quixote’s, Bartholomew will perform songs from the EP as well as from a full-length Invisible Allies album currently in the works.

Bartholomew and Watts, who have been in contact with one another for about five years, began their collaboration from a distance: One artist would start a piece of music and then send it to the other person. When the tracks bounced back and forth, the musicians knew they had a match. “We have the same general vocabulary and way that we think about music, so it’s been a really fruitful, creative collaboration,” Bartholomew states. “A lot of people write tracks specifically to be tracks; the way he composes seems like he’s thinking about it more as composition, which is more the way I approach music.”

The metaphysical implications of the name Invisible Allies are indicative of Bartholomew’s intent to “impart a sense of otherness” through his music. “I’ve always wanted to move people from one state of being into another—in some way inject mysticism into the mundane,” he notes. “Whether they’re in a car, at home or at a party listening to music, I would like to create the experience of another world, or open a door into the dreamtime, the world of meaning, symbols, idea, mythology and spirits of the organic.”

At the same time, the musician tries to avoid being “too woo-woo-juju or New Age.” He observes that “for some people, math is mysticism,” adding, “I think that our capacity for experiencing the spectrum of energetic frequencies is much bigger than most people realize, and it doesn’t necessarily have to be labeled spirituality or mysticism. It’s just a sense of wonder and awe at the fact that the universe is infinitely complex and larger than we realize.”

But is the sense of wonder getting through to his audience? Bartholomew says that at every show, he struggles with the fact that he’s playing indoors in cities. “It’s a disparity that I’m always looking at, figuring out my intention, and figuring out if I’m getting the message out, and if not, what I can do better to get that message across,” he admits.

So what has he learned in the process? “You know, it seems like when I’m most frustrated and feel like I’m either preaching to the choir or playing for people who are not interested in consciousness—they’re actually interested in being obliterated—there’s always one person who comes up to me and tells me that my music has touched them,” the musician states. “It may be one in a thousand, but if I’m touching somebody, then I feel like I’m being effective.”


Bluetech plays with DJ Little John at 9 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 30, at Don Quixote’s, 6275 Highway 9, Felton. Tickets are $12 in advance, $14 at the door. For more information, call 603-2294.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Health Screening

Santa Cruz wellness expert releases app to improve workplace well-being

 

Leo Sun; Full Moon, Venus Retro in Leo; Saturn Direct

It’s a complex week of planetary movements, challenges, demands and callings. We’re in the time of the Leo Sun. Leo—fixed fire, gold, the heart, generous, strong, noble, the king/queen—needs appreciation and praise from everyone in order to move forward. During Leo we gain a greater sense of self-identification by recognizing our creativity. It’s therefore a perfect time for Venus retrograding in Leo. In Venus retrograde we review and re-assess values. Venus retro in Leo concerns our self as valuable, acknowledging talents, gifts, abilities and offerings. Friday, Venus re-enters Leo (29 degrees, a critical degree) continuing the retrograde to 14 degrees Leo on Sept. 6. Friday (Full Moon) is also the (8 degrees) Leo solar festival, Festival of the Future. Leo is the heart of the sun, the heart of all that matters. When attuned to this heart, we have understanding and inclusivity. The heart of the Lion is Mitra (think “Maitreya,” the coming World Teacher). Leo prepares humanity to receive divine love from subtle sources and later to radiate that love to the kingdoms. Sirius, Ray 2, where love originates, streams through Regulus (heart of Leo), into the heart of the sun (Ray 2) and into all hearts. The heart of Leo is Regulus. Joining Venus, the love underlying all of creation appears. Saturday is Sun/Neptune (confusion or devotion) with late night Saturn turning stationary direct. Ideas, plans and structures held long in abeyance (since March 14) slowly move forward. (Read more on Leo and the week at nightlightnews.org and Risa D’Angeles’ Facebook page, accessed through my website.)

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of July 31

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Holy Cannoli

New bakery opens in Ben Lomond, plus Randall Grahm’s quest to grow 10,000 new grape varieties, and Mexican cooking classes

 

Is Santa Cruz turning into Malibu North?

It's got a ways to go before it gets wrecked like Malibu, but I think we need to be very careful about growth. Maria Mattioli, Santa Cruz, Psychotherapist

 

Bargetto Winery

A much-anticipated annual event at Bargetto Winery is the release of their very special La Vita red wine. June 7 was the day to be heralded this year, and I happily squeezed my car into their overloaded car park in eager anticipation of tasting the new La Vita nectar.

 

Margaritaville

Popular Capitola spot gets new owner and complete makeover