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Jul 30th
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Arts, Entertainment, Dining, Calendar

A&E

The Poems of David Thorn

The Poems of David Thorn

Editor’s note: In this week’s Poetry Corner, we feature the work of poet David Thorn. He has been published in Poetry Canada, in England, and many literary magazines across the United States, including the Porter Gulch Review, and has been the Poet of the Year three times. He is a writing teacher at UC Santa Cruz and Cabrillo College and is considered Santa Cruz’s original surfing poet.

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A&E

Environmentally Speaking

Environmentally Speaking

Renowned history and politics expert Douglas Brinkley talks conservationism at UCSC.
If you ever find yourself feeling cocky about all your achievements and accolades, contemplate Douglas Brinkley’s life for a while. Among the Rice University history professor’s accomplishments: He’s CBS News’ history commentator; he was selected as Rosa Parks’ official biographer; he’s Jack Kerouac’s authorized biographer; he’s the literary executor for Hunter S. Thompson; he’s written several articles for Rolling Stone, including profiles on Ken Kesey, Norman Mailer and Kurt Vonnegut as well as a cover story on Bob Dylan; he’s a contributing editor to Vanity Fair; his books include 1992’s Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt Naval History Prize-winning “Driven Patriot,” 1999’s “The Unfinished Presidency” (believed by many to be largely responsible for Jimmy Carter’s winning of the Nobel Peace prize) and 2006’s Robert F. Kennedy Book Award winner “The Great Deluge”; he’s a member of the Council on Foreign Relations;  he was invited to the White House twice to discuss history with the president … and the list goes on.

On Saturday, January 29, Brinkley presents his lecture “Change: Mobilizing the Historical Narrative” at UCSC.

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Literature

The Lotus Eaters

The Lotus Eaters

Debut novelist’s provocative tale reveals casualties of war through a camera lens
In college, her favorite professor gave her some good advice: Write the book you’d most like to read but haven’t yet found. “I loved big adventure novels—[Joseph] Conrad and stuff like that,” says Tatjana Soli, debut author of “The Lotus Eaters,” an ambitious work of literary fiction that captures the Vietnam War through the lens of a female photojournalist. “I remember it really bothering me that there were never women as main characters. They were always wives and girlfriends that got left behind. I really wanted to write a strong woman character that had exciting things happen to her.”

When Soli’s short fiction attracted the attention of an agent, he contacted her to ask if she had a novel. She told him her idea of writing a war story from the point of view of a woman. “He said that the Vietnam literature is very unpopular,” recounts Soli, “that there was no way women were going to be interested. I had no encouragement. I thought it would be my practice novel. But it was the only thing I really wanted to do.”

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Literature

GT Lit Picks

GT Lit Picks

I Love a Broad Margin to My Life
Tonight No Poetry Will Serve: Poems 2007–2010
Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas
Where the God of Love Hangs Out
Stories of Your Life and Others
We Have Met the Enemy
Nothing to Envy
Parrot & Olivier in America
Inside of a Dog

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A&E

Sundance Kid

Sundance Kid

Monterey Bay Area filmmaker makes it to Sundance
You don’t have to live in Hollywood to make it in the film industry. Just ask Douglas Mueller, who’s on his way to Park City, Utah, this week for the renowned Sundance Film Festival, where the feature-length movie he co-produced, Prairie Love, will debut.

Mueller, a California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB) alumni, and local resident, is among the respected, small cadre of filmmakers whose work will be shown at Sundance this year. The festival, founded by actor Robert Redford, can turn the names of relatively unknown films, producers, directors and actors, into movie magic. Think top contender Winter’s Bone and Jennifer Lawrence from last year’s festival.

Prairie Love is being featured in a category of films that were made for under $500,000. “The film is about three eccentric characters who are trying to find companionship in a desolate situation,” Mueller says. “A vagrant comes across a man who is ill and nurses him to health. In the process he discovers that the man was on his way to meet his pen pal girlfriend, and he reads his letters. The vagrant kills the other fellow, takes up his identity and goes to pick up his convict girlfriend.”

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A&E

The Poems of Jim Russo

The Poems  of Jim Russo

Editor’s notes: In this week’s Poetry Corner, we feature the work of Jim Russo who was born in North Beach. He moved to Santa Cruz County in 1963. As a former actor, he likes to write words that make people laugh, among other things.

My Tub
A big damn Polar Bear
Is getting into my tub
Hey man, I don't crowd your ice cube
It's gone? That's fucked!
Get out of my tub

Untitled
And birds make love at sunset
Humans should make love at sunset

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Literature

Food Change

Food Change

GT Editor hopes to tweak the conversations we have about ‘dieting,’ eating disorders and the hunger to be ‘thin’ in the new read,  ‘Shut Up, Skinny Bitches!’
I met him more than 10 years ago. The door in the Good Times office slammed shut and in walked Greg Archer, wearing a black vest, and exuding the type of charm that he’s well known for. For about six months, we sat next to each other, me in a boring cubicle and his section decked out with Christmas tree lights, streamers coming down from the ceiling and so on. We became fast friends. And then he became my boss when the previous editor moved on. Over the years, I’ve been able to watch Greg Archer evolve. He is known for his catchy style with language, his seamless leadership qualities, his genuine concern for his employees and his desire to create a newspaper that the community can rely on. And now, on top of all his accomplishments—a freelancer for magazines such as O Magazine, The Advocate, and others, the numerous awards he’s garnered, and much more—the man has taken on a new endeavor, co-author of the book, “Shut Up, Skinny Bitches! (The Common Sense Guide To Following Your Hunger and Your Heart).”

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Literature

‘Shift’ Happens

‘Shift’ Happens

Well, not quite. Peter Arnell’s book often misses the mark
The title “Shift” by Peter Arnell attracted me instantly when I came upon it while browsing in my bookstore. The word shift, to my way of thinking, refers to inner shifts or changes, and I hoped that by learning how the author had examined his life, I might be better able to make some necessary shifts of my own.

Inner shifts are a great challenge; they require that we notice our thoughts, and inquire into our inner nature. Inner shifts tend to come about when we are still, when we are in the state of “being;” they rarely come about as we hasten to complete our daily “to do” list.

Arnell is good at “doing,” and his book focuses on what he did to realize his two formidable goals: one, losing 256 pounds, thereby taking his weight down from 406 pounds to 150; the other, forging a successful career as a consumer brand marketing consultant for large companies such as Pepsi, Samsung, Reebok, to name a few.

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A&E

Locating Art’s Funny Bone

Locating Art’s Funny Bone

Introducing First Friday artist, Cahill Wesse
Cahill Wessel would not have lasted a day on Noah’s Ark. The 22-year-old artist, fresh out of UC Santa Cruz, believes that not only opposites, but also completely random and unrelated objects, attract.

When the young visionary looks at a taco, for instance, he doesn’t necessarily see what most of us do—crunchy, cheesy, (sometimes spicy), mouth-watering goodness. Instead, he imagines what it would look like when juxtaposed with another object. In this case, he chose skulls.

Loosening the art world’s necktie with his dark humor, homage to pop art and wild imagination, Wessel laughs in the face of all artists who take their work too seriously.

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A&E

Fungus Among Us

Fungus Among Us

The 37th Annual Santa Cruz Fungus Fair finds the food, fun and fascination in fungi
If I touch it am I going to die? This is the most frequently asked question every year at the Santa Cruz Fungus Fair. Luckily, it turns out the answer is no. Though Santa Cruz is home to two of the world’s deadliest mushrooms—the death cap (Amanita phalloides) and the destroying angel (Amanita ocreata), you would have to actually ingest them to die.

“There are a lot of mushrooms that can make you sick, but not many of them are fatal,” says Phil Carpenter, president of the Fungus Federation of Santa Cruz. Still, many species are edible—and tasty, he adds. Though Carpenter does collect edible local mushrooms for his table, he’s driven to search for different species of fungus for another reason. He calls it the treasure-hunt aspect.

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Mars Enters Scorpio: The Nine Tests

Over the years I’ve mentioned the nine tests of Mars and Scorpio. The tests are given to everyone—unawakened, beginning to awaken, and the awakened. The purpose is to test our strength, courage, ability to adapt, discriminate and have discernment. To see if we are deceived by illusion or are “warriors triumphant, emerging from the battle.”

 

Final Cut

Cedar Street Video to close after 10 years at downtown location

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of July 25

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

The Maestra Returns

Cabrillo Festival’s Marin Alsop is back to ‘rock the boat of tradition’
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I remember Santa Cruz when…

Santa Cruz | Librarian

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Muns Vineyard Rosé of Pinot Noir

This vivacious cherry-pink Rosé is a simply beautiful summer wine.

 

Time is Ripe

Local fruit harvests hit markets, Storrs Winery celebrates ‘Best White’, and a salt fix from heaven