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Sep 02nd
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Arts, Entertainment, Dining, Calendar

A&E

Art Scene Reboot

Art Scene Reboot

A new generation steps up to lead in Santa Cruz
Over the next few days, an air of intensity thickens around Santa Cruz—formerly the laid-back capitol of the Monterey Bay, now a pumping hub of interconnected creative outpourings in film, dance, visual, digital arts and music featuring plentiful opportunities to participate, rate, twit and stream video, soon appearing on a screen near you. Really.

The Santa Cruz Film Festival opens its tenth season with more local filmmakers than ever joining the international lineup. Tomorrow, as part of the First Friday Art Walk, UCSC’s Digital Arts and New Media program melding arts, engineering, humanities and sciences premieres 10 multidisciplinary works created by master of fine arts graduates along with a talk by art/technology guru Steve Dietz and a performance of a new interactive opera.

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A&E

Best S.C. Singer/Performer 2011

Best S.C. Singer/Performer 2011In a year when Santa Cruz could use a little more emotional sunshine, look who comes along to surprise us all—the most brightly lit star (literally) of all in the Cruzan bunch. Kudos to you, James Durbin, for giving Santa Cruz something to root for. It’s enough that Durbin had the chops to make the cut to be among the top contenders on the über hit American Idol; quite another that he’s proven he actually has creativity and—this is good—longevity. Oh, how The Durb has impressed. We raised our eyebrows when he belted out “You’ve Got Another Thing Coming” (by Judas Priest). We sat back and watched, rather amazed actually, by how well he wielded his vocal strength—with enough restraint—to deliver a winning rendition of Paul McCartney’s soulful “Maybe I’m Amazed.” Bon Jovi? Stevie Wonder? Bring it. 
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A&E

The Revolution Will Be Empathized

The Revolution Will Be Empathized

Dharma Punk Noah Levine comes home to Santa Cruz to celebrate his new book on the Buddha’s radical teachings
Twenty-five years ago you could’ve run into Noah Levine leaving your house or apartment with your stereo or jewelry tucked under his arm, stolen to trade or sell for crack cocaine. These days you’ll bump into him sitting on a meditation cushion, practicing and teaching compassion and loving kindness. To say that he’s come a long way might be an understatement. Though he claims to lack ambition, Noah’s third book has just been released; “The Heart of The Revolution: The Buddha’s Radical Teachings on Forgiveness, Compassion and Kindness” (HarperOne, 2011). This follows up on “Dharma Punx” and “Against The Stream.” Noah will return home to Santa Cruz for a free book event on Saturday, April 30 at Bookshop Santa Cruz at 7:30 p.m. GT recently spoke with the original punk rock Buddhist about ending suffering, giving up control and being a parent.

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A&E

Written in Stone

Written in Stone

Local tombstone is found on a Water Department outing
It started out just like any other day. Gary LeVa took off from his home in Watsonville and went to work for the City of Santa Cruz Water Department. Oftentimes, his days are spent crunching along gravel and hiking through grass, trying to find hidden water meters to read, replace or maintain. Over the years working in this business, he’s found all sorts of hidden treasures on job sites—spiders, pennies, bottles and the like. But this day in December 2010 was a very different type of day, with a very different finding. On this day, he was sent up to the Graham Hill area for a maintenance call on a water meter.

He started digging around in the dirt on the road near a telephone pole. Down the street was a home. “I got my stick and I heard this thud, and it didn’t sound right, so I started moving the dirt,” LeVa says. At the time, it was baffling because he figured this was where the water meter would be, but whatever was under the ground didn’t sound at all like a meter. As he continued to kick aside more dirt he was able to make out some letters. “This isn’t right,” he says about searching for the meter. But with an “aw heck, why not” approach, he continued to dig and soon realized it wasn’t a meter—it was a tombstone.

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Literature

The Poems of Lewis Turco

The Poems of Lewis Turco

Editor’s notes:  In this week’s Poetry Corner, we feature the work of Lewis Turco, author of “The Book of Forms.” He has two books coming out this year:  the fourth edition of “The Book of Forms,” and a book of criticism, “The Dialects of the Tribe: Post-Modern American Poets and Poetry.”

SEASONAL
Autumn swells the cribs. The moon
turns to ivory hanging
in the heavens, a vulture
with a skull’s smile.

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A&E

Jody Alexander: Sense and Sensibility

Jody Alexander: Sense and Sensibility

As a librarian, Jody Alexander manages and organizes information and materials.  Imagine her behind a 1940s reference desk, ready to find a kernel of information someone's searching for. This imagined Alexander perches on a wooden chair, looking out with benevolent intelligence from behind that desk. Here she deploys the connectivity that exists within a massive oak catalog organized on the Dewey Decimal System, hunting for Iroquois beaded belts, wielding associative brainpower and the codes typed on index cards contained within the catalog's preternaturally deep wooden drawers.  We need not imagine, as we've seen the evidence, that such old books, vintage wooden chairs, deep drawers, thumbed index cards, long, high information desk might be part of an artwork by Alexander, a benevolent intelligence engaged on an unique artistic journey, very worth following.

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A&E

WTF: Text Etiquette Arrives!

WTF: Text Etiquette Arrives!

There’s a proper way to text. Local Shelly Seeger shows people how
LOL. OMG. WTF? Gd 2 C U! OMG is right. These dreadful ways of texting have become the norm for many respectable adults who   have taken on teenager slang in their texting relationships. It’s embarrassing. And not just hideous text language, but unreturned texts, eating with your mouth open, not offering guests first dibs on the bread basket, business meeting snafus, taking cell phone calls in restaurants … the list goes on and on in terms of bad etiquette. And in a society where etiquette seems to have been displaced at the same time the Internet took over the world, it might be time for Americans to re-learn “modern etiquette.” These aren’t old-fashioned behaviors, but polite and considerate things to do when you’re eating, hosting, traveling, texting and so forth. It doesn’t have to be overly complicated. Making these simple lifestyle changes can feel empowering, give people a new sense of confidence and be fundamentally thoughtful gestures offered to other people.

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Literature

Kiss and Tell

Kiss and Tell

Excellent memoir, 'Reading Lips,' reveals a life, one kiss at a time
A funny thing happened to former Santa Cruz Sentinel columnist Claudia Sternbach when she was making the dreary rounds of agents trying to get her novel published. Just for fun, she started writing short-story snippets of memoir, snapshots from her own life very loosely grouped around a common thread: each story contained a kiss. With no thought of publication or "the marketplace," she delved into every aspect of her life's experience: comedy, tragedy, romance, laughter, and every gradation in between. Imagine her surprise when the first publisher she showed it to offered her a book contract.

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A&E

Ron Milhoan Paints Deep Memory in “No Place to Hide”

Ron Milhoan Paints Deep Memory in “No Place to Hide”

History looks out steadily from the surface of old photographs, holding a pose, jaws clenched, arranged against representative scenery in tones of black and white. History also seeps through dreams in vivid color, and charged moments loom near, or fade back into the pattern and texture of the emotional environment. Ron Milhoan, in “No Place to Hide,” at the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History, draws deep from his childhood memories of a Nebraska family homestead to tap directly into the racial unconscious for this body of expressive narrative paintings, heavy with meaning.

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A&E

Take the Camper/Cracker Soloing

Take the Camper/Cracker Soloing

Catching up with former Cruzan and beloved, revolutionary sweetheart David Lowery
Cause what the world needs now/ is another folksinger/ like I need a hole in my head,” sang Cracker and Camper Van Beethoven frontman, David Lowery on Cracker’s 1991 hit “Teen Angst (what the world needs now).” For 20 years Lowery lived up to his word. Now, with the recent release of The Palace Guards, Lowery hasn’t necessarily gone folksinger on his fans nor gained another hole in his head, but there is a noticeable dent.

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You Are What You Post

Online personality algorithms put astrological profiles to shame, but UCSC psychologists are raising questions about sharing personal data

 

Venus Direct, Mercury Retro Soon, Honoring Our Labors

As Burning Man (nine days, Aug. 30-Sept. 7 in the sign of Virgo) burns in the hot white desert sands, a petal of the rose created by retrograde Venus and the twelve-petaled Sun in Virgo’s petals unfold. All of us are on the burning ground (Leo) in the womb (cave of the heart) of the mother (Virgo), gestating for humanity once again (each year) a new state of consciousness. Both Virgo and Cancer, feminine (receptive energies) signs, are from our last solar system (Pleiades). When humanity first appeared on Earth we were nurtured by the mother, a matriarchy of energies (on islands in the Pacific). Eve, Isis and Mary are part of the lineages of our ancient Mother. Overseen by the Pleiades, the Earth (matter, mater, the mother) in that last solar system was imbued with intelligence (Ray 3). As we move toward autumn, another mother, Ceres realizes she has mere weeks left with her beloved daughter, Persephone. Persimmon and pomegranate trees prepare for autumn, their colors signs of hope as the light each day continues to dim. Sunday, Venus in Leo turns stationary direct, yet continues in her shadow until Oct. 9 (when retrograde Mercury turns direct). Slowly our newly assessed values emerge from the Venus retrograde. We thought in Venus retro how to use our resources more effectively. Mercury retrogrades Sept. 17. Monday is Labor Day. Let us honor the labor of everyone, all life a “labor.” Let us honor Labor Day and all those who have “served” (labored for) us this past year. We honor their labors. We honor the labor of our parents, those who have loved us. We honor our own labors, too. We are all in service, we are all laboring. We are all valuable.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Girl Gone Wild

’70s SF recalled in raw, poignant ‘Diary of a Teenage Girl’
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Sushi Garden

Local sushi empire expands to Scotts Valley

 

Do you overshare online?

I don’t think so. I just post things about my life, like successful things. Sometimes I just like sharing different news that I find interesting, or favorite artists, clothes, music. I like to post photos. Natalia Delgado, Santa Cruz, Server

 

McIntyre Vineyards

I recently met up with three friends for dinner at Sanderlings at Seascape Beach Resort. We chose to eat outside so we could watch the sun set over the ocean, but the Aptos fog rolled in and swallowed it up.

 

Sustainable Supper

The Homeless Garden Project’s Sustain Supper series supports its award-winning programs