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Feb 13th
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GT Lit Picks

ae_booksI Love a Broad Margin to My Life
Tonight No Poetry Will Serve: Poems 2007–2010
Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas
Where the God of Love Hangs Out
Stories of Your Life and Others
We Have Met the Enemy
Nothing to Envy
Parrot & Olivier in America
Inside of a Dog


Bookshop Santa Cruz recommends:

I Love a Broad Margin to My Life
by Maxine Hong Kingston
In her singular voice—humble, elegiac, practical—Maxine Hong Kingston (“The Woman Warrior”) sets out to reflect on aging as she turns 65. The spirit of this wonderful book gives a sense of doors opening wide onto an American life of great purpose and joy.

Tonight No Poetry Will Serve: Poems 2007–2010
by Adrienne Rich
Acclaimed poet Adrienne Rich’s new collection addresses relationships—partings/reconciliations, solidarities/ruptures, trust/betrayal, and exposure/withdrawal. Rich has said, “I believe almost everything I know, have come to understand, is somewhere in this book.”

Infinite City: A San Francisco Atlas
by Rebecca Solnit
“Infinite City,” Solnit's brilliant and super-cool reinvention of the traditional atlas, examines the many layers of meaning in one place: San Francisco. “At last a field book with the sense of San Francisco—the non sense, the real sense, the mysteries of the microclimates, gays and butterflies, gangs, boulevards and mysterious alleys. All here!” says Michael McClure.

Where the God of Love Hangs Out
by Amy Bloom
This book broke our hearts in the sweetest way possible. Two quartets of interlocked short stories lend the collection the satisfying feeling of a novel. This is a gem of a book that is truly beautiful and should not be missed.

Capitola Book Café recommends:
Stories of Your Life and Others
by Ted Chiang
This collection of short stories deserves constant re-introduction. Ted Chiang narrows the broad line between fiction and science fiction by taking a scalpel to “normal,” transforming it in ways that will blow your mind and challenge your beliefs. It's a breathless ride.

We Have Met the Enemy
by Daniel Akst
In a world where distraction and indulgence come tailor-made to meet our immediate desires, how do we look the donut in the face and say no? Daniel Akst guides us through the minefield of temptation with fresh perspective and a keen sense of just how much it takes to step away from an impulse. Oh, the humanity.

Nothing to Envy
by Barbara Demick
Barbara Demick's impeccable and provocative reporting allows us an unusual glimpse into a place that has, up until now, remained well hidden away. But what sets her work apart from most prior resources about North Korea is its profound sense of humanity. These are everyday stories of people making their way under staggeringly brutal circumstances. An eye opener.

Parrot & Olivier in America
by Peter Carey
A crowded, boisterous historical odyssey through the landscape and idea of America, Peter Carey's expansive novel holds us up to ourselves in grand, comic, and sometimes tragic fashion. His characters eagerly embody the American potential even as they expose the great gaps that still split our relatively new democracy.   

Inside of a Dog
by Alexandra Horowitz
A refreshing book in the never-ending sea of dog books, mainly because it's actually about dogs, not how they capture our hearts or save our marriages, but how they think and smell and perceive the world around them. Stop projecting your personal issues onto Fido and walk a mile in his paws. It'll do you good.

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Heart Me Up

In defense of Valentine’s Day

 

“be(ing) of love (a little) more careful”—e.e. cummings

Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of February 12

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Pub Watch

Mega gastro pub-in-progress at the Old Sash Mill, plus the best pasta dish downtown

 

How do you know love is real?

When you feel the groove in your heart and you’re inspired to dance. Becca Bing, Boulder Creek, Teacher

 

Temple of Umami

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How would you stop people from littering?

Teach them from the time that they’re small that it’s not an appropriate behavior. Juliet Jones, Santa Cruz, Claims Adjuster