Santa Cruz Good Times

Thursday
Apr 24th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Elizabeth Tells All

Award-winning local writer, Elizabeth McKenzie visits Bookshop Santa Cruz

Elizabeth McKenzie needs a strong cup of coffee. She just blasted into California on a plane from Italy and she’s a little wiped out. The up-and-coming member of literature’s elite is headed home to Santa Cruz, where she’ll begin another exhausting, but rewarding adventure—a book tour for her first novel, “MacGregor Tells The World.”

The long-time local, a 1981 UC Santa Cruz grad, is already winning praise for the book, a sweeping story about a handsome, 22-year-old man with a fondness for exquisite literature. But McKenzie has long been an avid and successful writer, finding gigs with publications like The New York Times, Threepenny Review and The Atlantic Monthly. In 2005, her first book, a collection of short stories called “Stop That Girl,” had readers swooning over her captivating writing style. There’s no doubt they were excited when hearing that the author had another book coming out.

In the read, McKenzie’s protagonist,  MacGregor West, is not particularly “doing anything” with his life, but he has enormous potential. He also has a crappy car (full of junk) to boot. This hero of sorts is an orphaned young man. His mom bailed on him, then died when he was young. He never knew his father. Raised by his aunt (his mother’s twin), and growing up with his cousin, Fran, Mac has a few obvious hang-ups and frustrations about the way life has treated him. He’s a little bruised, to say the least, with a tendency toward self-sabotaging himself when things do go well. Still, even though his car and his life are less than impressive, these things don’t stop him from pining for a girl he falls madly in love with—at first sight.

Her name is Carolyn Ware, the daughter of a famous  author, Charles Ware. The elder Ware long ago wrote a best-selling novel (think “On the Road”) about his wild adventures with long-time pal, Bill Galeotto.

Mac has a stack of letters that his deceased mother left for him with Charles Ware’s address in the sender’s corner. Knowing that these letters may have some sort of connection to his past, Mac tracks down the Ware residence and there he instantly finds Carolyn. What follows is a rapid and zany love affair between two people brought together by fate. As good luck would have it, even more secrets unfurl. It’s a story that will sear into your mind, and stay with you. The characters don’t leave your consciousness, which is yet another reason why McKenzie is a stalwart writer.

GT caught up with McKenzie right after she landed in California, following her trip to Italy. We poked around her brain for some insights to her success.

This is now your second book. Was your first book, “Stop That Girl,” a success?

It was actually chosen for a few different things: a “Newsday” book of the year, and the Library Journal best book of the year. It was on a shortlist for the story prize—a big, cool prize in New York. NPR listed it as a summer reading pick.

How long have you been writing?

Since I was a kid. I started writing poetry and was into journalism for a while. I was always writing, collecting works, keeping journals, published my own magazine and so forth.

How did you get your start writing professionally?

It was a slow process, sending stories out, pulling myself out of the actual world of journalism and magazines and holing up in Santa Cruz, writing stories one by one, getting them in literary magazines and I was finally able to sell my collection. It (“Stop That Girl”) came out in 2005.

How long did it take you to write “MacGregor Tells the World”?

I wrote a first draft maybe 10 years ago and worked on it for about two years then. Time went by and I worked on it again. I cannibalized that draft and wrote a whole other book. … I was writing it up through the copyrighting process in January and February [of this year].

What’s your writing process like?

I get up in the morning and do whatever I can get done before noon. In the afternoon I have to do other stuff. (She has a son who will soon start second grade.) I start at 7 or 8 and always leave something dangling from the day before. When I finish, I print what I did that day and at night, after dinner, I edit what I did. [In the morning] I enter my edits and that launches me. I try to get [done] three to five pages a day.

Why did you set this book in San Francisco and Redwood City?

I lived in the city and on the peninsula as well, when I was going to grad school (at Stanford) and after that for a while. I love the name Redwood City. For some reason it amuses me. My father grew up on the peninsula. I have a fondness for it, and it has changed so fast. The city? What’s not to love? Growing up in Southern California, it was the Emerald City to me, a place I wanted to be.

The friendship between Charles Ware and Bill Galeotto sounds like something from “On the Road.” Was this intentional?

Like Neal Cassidy and Jack Kerouac. It’s not like I intentionally cross-reference and make it resemble anything particular. I was very steeped in that culture in college and after, I was very interested in it for a while.

What’s your advice for someone who has written a book and wants to take the next step?

You have to keep writing in the face of a huge vacuum. If you can keep doing it in the face of that, and you’re still productive and enjoying it, sometime, you’ll have that breakthrough.

Elizabeth McKenzie will be speaking at 7:30 p.m. on Thursday, July 12 at Bookshop Santa Cruz, 1520 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz. For more information about her novel, visit macgregortells.com .
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Best of Santa Cruz County 2014

The 2014 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll Come on in, and have a look around. There’s a lot to see—hundreds of winners selected by thousands of GT readers across Santa Cruz County. So if some of this looks familiar, it’s probably because you helped make it happen. But there are always new things to discover, too—you could go to a different winner or runner-up every day in the Food and Drink category alone, and you’d be booked just about until next year’s Best of Santa Cruz County issue comes out.

 

Something Essential Disappears

Lunar and solar eclipses follow one another. Lunar eclipses occur at full moons, and solar eclipses at new moons. Two weeks ago at the full moon we had the blood red moon—a total lunar eclipse (the next one is Oct. 8). On Monday night, April 28 (new moon), as the Sun, Moon and Earth align, a solar eclipse (Sun obscured) occurs. Eclipses signify something irrevocably is changed in our world. The Sun is our essential life force. Monday’s new moon, 9 degrees Taurus, is also an annular solar eclipse when the Moon moves centrally in front of the Sun, yet does not cover the Sun completely. The Sun's outer edges, still visible, form a “ring of fire” around the Moon.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 24

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Palate-Stretching 101

A wine education with Soif’s experts As a veteran of many weekend wine “seminars” at Soif, I have to confess that I’ve never known less (going in) and learned more (coming out) than I did last week at the Spanish Wine Tasting with ace rep Brian Greenwood. These are classy, casual events and it’s hard to imagine having this much flavor fun anywhere for $20.

 

Martin Ranch Winery

Sauvignon Blanc 2011 One of my favorite wines is Sauvignon Blanc, and this one made by Martin Ranch is particularly lovely. Bright, crisp and refreshing, it’s perfect to pair with fish and shellfish—and good for picnics as it has an easy screw-cap bottle. There’s nothing worse than setting down your blanket, pulling out your sandwiches—and then realizing you don’t have a corkscrew.

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management