Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Apr 18th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Busy Signals

AE_event_DeadManCellPhoneOur obsessions with cell phones becomes evident in new play
Gerry Gerringer, artistic director of Actors’ Theatre, is kicking off the company’s 26th season with a play you’ve probably never heard of. “Dead Man’s Cell Phone” may not have the theatrical history of a Shakespeare comedy, but it’s the perfect example of what’s hot right now in contemporary playwriting.

Sarah Ruhl, who was nominated for a 2010 Tony award for her play “In the Next Room,” wrote this new dark comedy, which revolves around Jean (Julia Cunningham), a woman who answers a stranger’s phone when it won’t stop ringing, only to find out that the man is dead. Rather than seek medical assistance for him, Jean gets herself entangled in his dysfunctional relationships with his alienated widow, his commanding mother and his mysterious mistress, and even falls in love with his lonely brother.

“It’s so different from everything you’ve seen,” says Santa Cruz actress April Green, who plays the widow of the deceased. “Ruhl weaves deadpan seriousness with hilariousness.”

Gerringer was inspired by Ruhl’s playwriting last year, when he directed her 2005 Pulitzer finalist, “The Clean House,” about a Brazilian cleaning woman who aspires to be a standup comedian. Like “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” it layers profundity with eccentricity and caters to the modern-day theatergoer’s thirst for shock value.

“I love dark comedies like these with tight, concise dialogue that surprises you,” says Gerringer. “This is not a Woody Allen comedy where you can see the joke coming from three lines ahead; Ruhl comes out of left field.”

With a simple set to include nine drop-down sheets of fabric representing the various locations in which the drama unfolds and some back lighting, Gerringer will rely on his six actors and the biting dialogue to do all the work. Considering Ruhl inserts very little stage direction into her dramas and through omission leaves them open for interpretation, the actors get to decide how they will be performed.

“It’s a play you can play with,” says Green, who appreciates the opportunity to experiment with the script, rather than follow it precisely as in traditional theater. “The words can be read many different ways and Ruhl layers in one thematic subtext after another.”

One of the central motifs, according to Gerringer, is the idea that the more people are connected technologically, the more they are disconnected in their relationships with others. As long as your cell phone is in your pocket, you are both present and absent at the same time.

In an age where ringtones have become the soundtrack to our lives, our over-reliance on iPhones and BlackBerrys serves as the perfect punch-line for Ruhl’s play, which premiered just three years ago at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Washington D.C.

We’re on our cell phones all the time,” says Gerringer. “It speaks to our society’s infatuation with technology while we gradually lose our ability to connect with one another in tangible, personal ways.”

Green would argue, however, that the relationships of the play’s lead female protagonists are what drive the plot.

Though the drama does some analyzing of the female psyche and our obsession with technology, it wouldn’t be a play by Ruhl without quirky observation, a blurred line between the everyday and the surreal and knee-slapping one-liners.

“No humor resonates like truthful humor,” says Gerringer, recalling a scene in which a cell phone ironically goes off during the dead man’s funeral. “He’s the funniest dead guy to ever be seen on stage.”


“Dead Man’s Cell Phone” runs Sept. 17 through Oct. 10 at 1001 Center St., Santa Cruz. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets may be purchased at brownpapertickets.com or by calling 425-PLAY.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.