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Feb 13th
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THE ECLIPSE

film_TheEclipseWatch out for The Eclipse, an unusual and affecting hybrid of a movie from Irish filmmaker Conor McPherson. A finely limned character drama about a lonely widower and father slowly coming to terms with life, death, and grief, the tone is part magic realism, and part lyrical Irish folk ballad. It's certainly not what you'd call a thriller in any conventional sense. And yet it contains two or three of the most frightening, jump-out-of-your-skin shock moments you'll see in the movies all year. The story is set in the rugged, starkly beautiful coastal hamlet of Cobh, in County Cork, during an annual literary festival. The wonderful Ciaran Hinds play Michael Farr, a local woodshop teacher who has dabbled in story-writing and volunteers at the festival every year as a driver, ferrying visiting literati to and from events. Having recently lost his wife to cancer, Michael plays single parent to his teenage daughter and 10-year-old son, and looks in on his elderly father-in-law, incapacitated in a local nursing home. When one of his charges at the festival turns out to be British novelist Lena Morelle (Iben Hjejle), a writer of ghost stories, Michael confesses to her that he's been having some unsettling experiences that he thinks might be ghosts. She believes she's had genuinely ghostly encounters as well, and as they discuss the nature of haunting and the meaning of loss (and begin to grow a delicate friendship), Michael's visions become more urgent, and menacing. Adapting a story by Billy Roche, McPherson offers a shrewd study in contrasts; Hinds' stoic Michael could not be more down-to-earth, and his daylight world of parenthood and his book festival duties is normal to film_eclipsethe point of banality (including a rude, snobby, drunken cad of a bestselling author played to hissable perfection by Aidan Quinn). But like Michael, the viewer fills with dread as soon as night falls and the visitations begin. Meanwhile, the modern world, with its cell phones, computers, and arcade games, bustles along under the shadow of the (allegedly haunted) Gothic cathedral on the hill—visible from every perspective in the town—always suggesting the presence of the otherworldly, in one form or another. This is a wistful, beautifully wrought tale that achieves something much more emotionally rich than your standard ghost story. Just don't go home alone to a dark house afterwards. (R) 88 minutes. (★★★) LJ

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Heart Me Up

In defense of Valentine’s Day

 

“be(ing) of love (a little) more careful”—e.e. cummings

Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of February 12

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