Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Aug 20th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Back Track

fm railwayHaunted ex-POW confronts past in ‘Railway Man’

Is revenge really sweet? Even when one has been horribly wronged—in a wartime setting, for instance—is an eye-for-an-eye style of vengeance ever really justified? Indeed, can any amount of revenge ever compensate for the original injury? These are issues grappled with in The Railway Man, a handsome and quietly moving drama adapted from the bestselling 1995 nonfiction memoir by Eric Lomax, who, as a young British army officer, survived brutal conditions in a Japanese POW camp during World War II.

Scripted by Frank Cottrell Boyce and Andy Paterson, and directed by Jonathan Teplitzky, the film begins demurely enough, a couple of decades after the war, with no hint of the horror story at its core. Middle-aged Eric Lomax (Colin Firth) is a slightly fusty, eccentric, professorial type who is nuts about trains. He has an encyclopedic knowledge of British railway timetables and knows the most efficient way to get from point A to point B by train from any jumping-off place on the map of Britain.

This talent endears him to Patti (Nicole Kidman), a woman he meets by chance on a train one day heading north to Glasgow. Her interest gradually opens up the normally preoccupied Eric, and they chat for a while, but part when he reaches his stop. However, he figures out when and by which train she’ll be returning, conspires to meet her at the station, and romance blossoms. All of which is recounted in flashback by Eric to a half dozen astonished, solitary gentlemen with whom he regularly meets at a seaside cafe.

It isn’t until the night after their lovely wedding in an ancient village church that the viewer, along with Patti, gets a first glimpse of the darkness bottled up inside of Eric. Flashbacks to scenes of torture he endured in the camp begin invading his daily life, shutting him down emotionally. He refuses to discuss it with Patti, so she goes to his friend, Finlay (Stellan Skarsgard), from the cafe group, to get the whole story.

All of these men had been young officers in the British signal corps stationed in Singapore early in the war. When Singapore fell to the Japanese, the army of British engineers were transported to a labor camp in Thailand to hack a railroad line out of the fetid jungle into Burma. Conditions are hellish enough (and Teplitzky frames our first look at the slave labor camp, lit by torchlight, as an inferno out of Dante’s), but Eric (played as a young man by Jeremy Irvine) is singled out for special punishment when he claims responsibility after a radio receiver he, Finlay (Sam Reid), and the others cobbled together out of spare parts is discovered by the camp commanders.

Patti doesn’t know how to help Eric exorcise his demons—until Finlay learns that the Japanese interpreter, Nagase, who carried out most of the actual violence against Eric, is now operating a Memorial War Museum on the site of the old camp. Circumstances soon force Eric toward a confrontation. “We can’t sleep, we can’t love,” Finlay tells him, summing up the collective damage done to them all. Eric is convinced that for the sake of the entire group, he will have to press the matter to some resolution, one way or another.

Kidman doesn’t have much to do after her first couple of scenes, except look concerned. And while Teplitzky tries not to be gratuitous, torture scenes are always psychologically brutalizing to watch, even if filmed with some discretion. But because we identify so strongly with the soft-spoken, self-effacing complexity of both Firth and Irvine in the role of Eric, the film demands that we viewers also examine how we might react in similar circumstances.

Both Tanroh Ishida and Hiroyuki Sanada as the younger and elder Nagase are allowed their moments of revelation and remorse as the story plays out. How the real-life Lomax responded is now a matter of public record, giving the film a more contemplative ending than we might expect. The Railway Man doesn’t pack a wallop; instead, it invites its audience to consider our own notions of justice, morality and forgiveness.


THE RAILWAY MAN

★★★ (out of four)

With Colin Firth, Nicole Kidman, Jeremy Irvine, and Stellan Skarsgard. Written by Frank Cottrell Boyce and Andy Paterson. From the book by Eric Lomax. Directed by Jonathan Teplitzky. A Weinstein Company release.

Rated R. 116 minutes.

 

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Trending Now

Whether you live by the Vogue bible or choose to go into your day wearing what you slept in, odds are you wear clothes.

 

The Thought Form of Solution

It’s our last week of Leo before the sun enters Virgo (next Friday/Saturday). The planets this week make complex patterns and relationships (vibrational cadences and rhythms) with the outer planets, mainly Neptune—the planet that veils, obscures, protects and finally refines us. Neptune offers us entrance into a deeply spiritual sense of comfort and solace. Neptune is the personality ruler of Pisces (saviors of the world) and soul ruler of Cancer (world mother). “The fish goddesses who leapt from earth (Virgo) to water (Pisces) unitedly give birth to the Fish God (Christ, the Soul) who introduces the waters of life  (Neptune & Aquarius) into the ocean of substance (matter, mother bringing light to the world. Thus does Neptune work.” (Esoteric Astrology).

 

Final Cut

Cedar Street Video to close after 10 years at downtown location

 

Cultures Collide

No surprises, but lots to savor in foodie film ‘The Hundred-Foot Journey’
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Kauboi

Japanese-Western themed unites sushi with whiskey and beefgrill

 

How should Santa Cruz develop downtown around the San Lorenzo River?

Santa Cruz | Artist/Show Promoter

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Have Mercy!

Looking for a frisky summer wine at a reasonable price? Look no further than Mercy Vineyards’ 2013 Sauvignon Blanc ($20). Richly textured “with an exotic flavor profile,” the wine reveals aromas of honeydew melon and honeysuckle, with anise appearing as a star attraction. Smidgeons of pineapple and honeycomb add a touch of sexiness to this well-balanced, easy-drinking wine, which pairs well with a variety of cuisine —especially ceviche, calamari and other not-too-heavy foods.