Santa Cruz Good Times

Monday
Oct 20th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Cliff Hanger

film_farleyclimbBanff Mountain Film Festival unleashes daring movies at the Rio Theatre

Go climb a rock. Or at least watch a movie about people who climb rocks, and put their lives at risk for fun, by catching the Banff Mountain Film Festival at 7 p.m. on Feb. 26 and 27 at the Rio Theatre. The thrill ride of a festival is back once again to woo adventurers with a series of short films that are inspiring, jaw-dropping, and feature feats that are beyond your imagination. Sporting a fantastic lineup of films, two of the ‘scene stealers’ are the films Finding Farley and First Ascent: The Impossible Climb. The latter stars Santa Cruz’s own spectacular rock climber Chris Sharma, who scales perhaps the world’s most difficult rock climb, and Finding Farley explores the aquatic journey of a couple, their toddler, and their dog as they travel down bodies of water in search of a legendary writer who did a similar trip long ago. Here’s a quick run-down of these two highlighted films.

First Ascent: The Impossible Climb.

24 mins, directed by Peter Mortimer, Nick Rosen, and Josh Lowell. Starring Chris Sharma.

If you’ve lived in Santa Cruz for any amount of time, by now you’ve heard of legendary superstar rock climber, Chris Sharma, a young man who hails from our town and has gone on to achieve enormous success in the world of rock climbing. In First Ascent: The Impossible Climb, the film follows Sharma as he decides to tackle what’s being deemed “the most difficult rock climb in the world.” Granted, Sharma has been called the world’s best rock climber, so the match would seemingly be perfect. But even for an expert, there are some climbs that are just impossible. And that’s the case for the challenge he takes on with a “90-metre limestone cave on Mount Clark, Calif.” This never-before-climbed mountain sits at the California/Nevada border, and appears to be a sheer cliff. Yet Sharma takes it on with confidence, humility, and a whole lot of screaming (that’s his style as he scales rocks).

The movie puts us right there with Sharma as he travels deep into the rural land, and along a one-hour straight uphill hike to finally discover the limestone cliff. With his bulging arm muscles and lithe frame, Sharma begins the ascent, but he continually finds a specific challenging area where he keeps falling. We see him dangling there, barely holding on, then slipping, falling, and dangling where his rope catches him. He tries to ascend, again and again. Eventually, realizing that it’s not happening quite yet, he returns to Spain, where he lives much of the time these days, with his girlfriend, and begins strength training there for this “impossible climb” at Mount Clark. Here, we get a glimpse into the personal life of the famous Sharma, and what makes him tick—love and rock climbing.

Eventually, Sharma makes it back to California to tackle Mount Clark again, and what filmgoers see is a man who could challenge Spiderman any day. With numerous attempts, he eventually makes it up the great wall. And we are once again reminded of why Chris Sharma is Santa Cruz’s—and the world’s—best rock climber.
First Ascent: The Impossible Climb plays at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 27 at the Rio Theatre, along with the following short films: Revolution One; Azazel; Take a Seat; Africa Revolutions Tour; and The Ultimate Skiing Showdown.


Finding Farley

63 minutes. Directed by Leanne Allison. Starring Leanne Allison and Karsten Heuer.

In this heartwarming, award-winning movie, you’ll surely sink into the depths of nature, travel, family and literature. Finding Farley is a lovely narrative film, looking more like a “story” than a typical talking-head documentary. The film stars real-life couple Leanne Allison and Karsten Heuer, along with their 2-year-old toddler, Zev, and dog, Willow. The foursome set out on an adventure to find Canadian adventurer and nature author Farley Mowat. This author, whom they strive to find in Nova Scotia, is known for his books “Never Cry Wolf,” “A Whale for the Killing,” “People of the Deer” and many others.

The husband/wife filmmakers decide to take a journey based on the tales told in Mowat’s books. They cross rivers, sail the ocean, take a train, battle bugs, cook up grub outside, watch elk and bear meander around, and even run into a polar bear at one point.

It’s a gripping tale about a family who crosses 5,000 kilometers in an adventure together, all the while writing letters to Mowat about what they’re discovering, and how they look forward to meeting him at the end of their journey. The story will be alluring to anyone who’s ever wanted to free themselves from an office cubicle and see what an unrestricted life looks like. It’s inspiring, daring and motivating.

Finding Farley plays at 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 26 at the Rio Theatre, along with the following films: Kranked—Revolve, Deep/Shinsetsu; MedeoZ; Mustang—Journey of Transformation; and First Ascent: Alone on the Wall.


Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Field Work

Santa Cruz Mountain winemakers explain how the harvest works, and what kind of wine to expect from this year's crop

 

Libra's Two Choices

Libra (our last week) is the sign of creating right relations and values. In Libra we are asked to choose how to be, our identity in the world. We can maintain a hermetic sealed-off attitude (my life, my work, my money, etc.) or we can gain knowledge of world events and learn more about those in need. Libra is a group sign—self with others. Here are some events occurring in our world this week concerning food, poverty, spirituality, values and global realities. The UN (a spiritual experiment) each month places a “light” upon world problems. This week a light shines on Rural Women, Farms, Food & Poverty. Before we choose to respond we must have knowledge. “So we can each do our part.” Oct. 15 - International Day of Rural Women (unrecognized with few resources); Oct. 16 - World Food Day & Family Farming: Feeding the World, Caring for the Earth; Oct. 17 - Eradication of Poverty Day (international). During the month of Libra (with Saturn exalted), we pause, contemplate and assess what it is we know, don’t know, and need to know. Libra receives and distributes Ray 3 of divine intelligence, right relations, right choice and right economy (Venus). Use your intelligence “tips the Libran scales” in terms of being able to see and then choose between the two paths Libra offers (return to the past or step forward into Scorpio’s Discipleship). Libra (the oscillating light) prepares us for the great tests and conflicts in Scorpio. In Libra we are subtly tested as we learn the nature of polarized energies (s/he loves me, s/he loves me not). In Libra we learn more about ourselves through others. Libra’s Ray 3 asks us to become more adaptable and skillful. And then we are to teach each other what we know. In Libra, we all become teachers. In all these ways love is cultivated.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Docs Without Borders

United Nations Association Film Festival showcases documentaries from around the globe
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

 

Nut Kreations

Co-owner Craig Olsen goes nuts over nuts

 

What artist or artists participating in the encore weekend of Open Studios should not be missed?

Santa Cruz | Teacher

 

Martin Ranch Winery

Friends who are wine club members of Martin Ranch invited us to the winery’s fun and festive annual barbecue, where the wine is flowing and the food just keeps on coming. Music and dancing are part and parcel of the action, and a good time is guaranteed.

 

Beer Bus

Santa Cruz’s new Brew Cruz, award winning ales, mole by el Jardín, and Wildcat Ridge Chardonnay