Santa Cruz Good Times

Tuesday
Sep 30th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

For the Birds

dining_CariciasLittle Caricias Café offers healthy alternatives to fast food on Beach Hill
Caricias Café sits on the small patio in front of Boca Del Cielas, a mauve Victorian bed and breakfast just up the First Street hill from the Boardwalk Bowl. Tico, the resident scarlet macaw, shimmied up the pole to her perch and surprised us with a loud squawk. The immense parrot then climbed down the backside of the wrought iron fence behind my daughter's chair, nibbled playfully on her sweatshirt, and gently grasped her elbow with zygodactyl feet.

On the whiteboard which describes the menu, I was surprised to see a fruit Pico de Gallo ($3). Spears of pineapple, honeydew melon, mango and cucumber were served with Tajin Clasico, a brand of slightly tart seasoning that includes powdered chilies and salt. I learned that dried chilies are enjoyed on everything in Mexico, especially fruit. Even better than Tajin was the spicier house-made version based on toasted, dried Japanese red chilies.

The Wrap ($5) was beautifully presented with more fruit. The large, appetizingly green spinach tortilla was spread with Mediterranean hummus (they also offer jalapeño hummus) and filled with romaine lettuce, chicken breast, sweet dried cranberries and crunchy almonds.

The following week I returned for breakfast. A Chorizo and Egg Burrito ($3.00) was waiting in the coffee cart's warming tray. The rustic, black-speckled flour tortilla, made in-house, was thick and chewy; perfect fuel for an aerobic beachfront workout. The spicy potato burrito lived up to its name, but I still made sure to sprinkle it with the wonderful chili powder.

The selection of 12- and 16-ounce coffee drinks includes lattes ($2.75/$3.25) and mochas ($3.25/$3.75), and water and sodas are also sold.

Bionicos ($3.50) is simple and guiltless satisfaction. At the bottom of the 16-ounce cup is a layer of yogurt topped with chopped almonds and sweet granola. The cup is then filled with fresh fruit including blackberries, sliced mangos and strawberries.


Caricias Cafe, 118 First St., Santa Cruz, 457-2430. Open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. daily.

H H H


Speaking of summer fruit, olallieberries are ripe at Swanton Berry Farms' Coastways Ranch. Last year we wandered around the long rows of vines picking our own berries ($4 per pound) in the cool coastal fog. Children exclaimed in delight at each discovery of a fruit-filled plant. This year's season may run only until mid-July. If you miss the olallies, blackberries are expected to be ripe mid-July through August. Call the farm's hotline for an updated schedule.

The strawberry U-pick ($2.50 per pound) should last until October, and there are fields at both Coastways and the Farm Stand. If you're not feeling that ambitious, the stand sells fruit, preserves and baked goods.


Swanton Berry Farm, 469-8804. Farm Stand, open daily 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., located two miles north of Davenport at 25 Swanton Rd. Coastways Ranch is open daily for strawberries and olallieberries 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., eight and a half miles north of the Farm at 640 Cabrillo Hwy., Pescadero. Visit swantonberryfarm.com

Comments (1)Add Comment
Keep up the good work!
written by TONY & ILIANA, July 21, 2010
Thanks for the delicious burritos!
our favorite is the potatoes with red spicy chilli =) Mmmm...

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Reflecting Glass

Composer Philip Glass’ first trip to Big Sur was by motorcycle; little did he know that he’d establish a music festival there six decades later.

 

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, occurs this year during Libra, the sign of creating right relations with all aspects life and with earth’s kingdoms. We contemplate (the Libra meditation) forgiveness, which means, “to give for another.” Forgiveness is not pardon. It’s a sacrifice (fire in the heart, giving from the heart). Forgiveness is giving up for the good of the other. This is the law of evolution (the path of return).

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of September 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Wurst Case Scenario

Venus Spirits releases agave spirit, Renee Shepherd on planting garlic, Sausagefest 2014, and wine harvest in full swing

 

Do you think you are addicted to technology?

Santa Cruz  |  Unemployed

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Apricot Wine for Dessert

Thomas Kruse Winery, a participant in the new Santa Clara Wine Trail, has been around for a long time—since 1971, to be exact. When our little group arrived to try some wine at the Kruses’ low-key tasting room, Thomas Kruse and his wife Karen were there to greet us. Theirs is a small operation, and they’re proud to offer quality wine at affordable prices. “Because we are small and low-tech, it’s easy to relate to the whole winemaking process,” says Karen—and the Kruses take pride in making wine “just like it has been made for centuries.”