Santa Cruz Good Times

Oct 07th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

A Taste of Portugal

dining_linguicaIs it linguiça or chouriço? This debate apparently persists in Portugal and in America's Portuguese communities alike. These sausages are essential to Brazilian feijoada black bean stew and Portuguese caldo verde, a potato soup made green with fresh, thinly sliced kale. The sausages are smoked, and very different from the finely ground raw offal version we know locally as chorizo.

According to David Leite, a renowned food writer who grew up in a Portuguese neighborhood in Fall River, Mass., (as did Emeril Lagasse), what you call it depends on where you grew up. There are a wide variety of styles from lean to fatty, and mild to spicy named either way. The only agreement Leite mentions, is that linguiça is more slender.

I believe Joe Barcelos would beg to differ. Barcelos, who emigrated from Portugal when he was 15, began making traditional linguiça in his San Jose backyard; hand-cutting lean pork, mixing it with garlic, vinegar, red chilies, and spices, stuffing it into casings, and smoking it over a wood fire. Friends suggested he sell to neighboring Portuguese communities, and by 2008 demand was so great he opened a factory.

I met Barcelos at Shopper's Corner where he was cooking slices of mild, medium and spicy linguiça in an electric skillet. His "Sandwich Size" sausages are fat, roughly a quarter of a pound, and filled with chunks of deliciously seasoned meat. I'd choose one of these puppies over a Polish any time.

The pork itself is hormone- and antibiotic-free and without nitrates or MSG. And according to my calculations the percentage of fat in a competitor's natural sausages is 35 percent higher, with Barcelos' fat content being equivalent to that of turkey franks.

Barcelos' Linguiça, (866) 589-2571. Available at Shopper’s Corner and New Leaf Markets. Visit

Comments (2)Add Comment
written by author, February 16, 2011
Try this email from the website.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

There's also a fax number, FAX (209) 879-0324.


Barcelos Linguicia
written by Mike Kaufmann, December 05, 2010
Having two Linguicias while watching the 49ers this morning yielded two large chunks of gristle! That seems to be a bit much! I took a picture, but the GT's email doesn't seem to take attachments. And Barcelos doesn't seem to include an email address! Humph!

Write comment
smaller | bigger


Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share


Making a Scene

As it celebrates its 30th year, Santa Cruz County’s Open Studios is one of the most successful in the country—and a make-or-break event for many local artists


The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program


At Clothes Range

FashionART’s 10th anniversary show introduces a new generation of designers on the edge


A Ritual & Initiation

The Pope has come and gone, but his loving presence ignited new hope and goodness in many. While he was in NYC, China’s ruler arrived in Washington D.C. East (China) and West (Rome), meeting in the middle, under Libra, balancing sign of Right Relations. The Pope arrived at Fall Equinox. Things initiated at Fall Equinox are birthed at Winter Solstice. The Pope’s presence was a ritual, an initiation rite—like the Dalai Lama’s visits—offering prayers, teachings and blessings. Rituals anchor God’s plan into the world, initiating us to new realities, new rules. The Pope’s presence brings forth the Soul of the United States, its light piercing the veils of materialism. The Pope’s visit changed things. New questions arise, new reasons for living. A new wave of emerging life fills the air. Like a cocoon shifting, wings becoming visible. The winds are different now. Calling us to higher vision, moral values, virtues that reaffirm and offer hope for humanity. A changing of the guard has occurred. Appropriately, this is the week of the Jewish Festival of Sukkoth (’til Oct. 4), when we build temporary homes (little huts in nature), entering into a harvest of prayer and thanksgiving, understanding our fragile and impermanent existences. We are summoned to reflect upon our lives, our humanity, our nature, our spirit and each other. Offering gratitude, becoming a magnet for others. We observe. We see the needs. We love more.
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments


What’s your biggest pet peeve?

When people say they’re “going down” somewhere, and they’re actually traveling north. Julia Ragen, Santa Cruz, Psychologist


Downhill Cellars

An easy-drinking Chardonnay from Downhill Cellars


If whales have a message for humans, what might it be?

“Do not come in the water and join us.” Howard Hall, Santa Cruz, Retired


Wargin Wines

The wine world is buzzing about this Pinot Gris