Santa Cruz Good Times

Tuesday
Sep 30th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Foodie Road Trip

dining_ferrybuildingThe Ferry Building Farmers Market is a community celebration

San Francisco's Ferry Building Farmers Market is considered one of the best in the country for its diversity of produce and the uniqueness of artisinal foodstuffs. Each week, its three markets attract 25,000 visitors, the largest one on Saturdays.

In the spirit of sustainability I gathered canvas bags, a trio of reusable mesh produce bags ($7.50 Bed Bath & Beyond) and stepped onto Metro's 17 Express bus just before 7 a.m. to catch Caltrain at San Jose's Diridon Station. From an upstairs seat overlooking homes and fruit-laden citrus trees I pondered the juxtaposition of graffiti-tagged warehouses and backyard tennis courts.

The Sunnyvale Caltrain parking lot was covered with farmers market canopies, a scene that would be repeated at the Belmont and Mountain View stations on Sunday. I envisioned a future in which our own little train would connect us with North Coast farmers at a Davenport market.

Cater-corner from the San Francisco station I hopped on the Muni's T-trolley for a short ride down to the rejuvenated Embarcadero, disembarking just past the Bay Bridge. It was a short walk along the bay toward the clock-faced spire of the 1898 ferry building.

At the pier's entrance, cooks griddled pancakes and French toast for the hungry hordes. I worked my way back to find the farmers. Like a kid in a candy store not knowing where to start, I waited at Healdsburg's Downtown Bakery for a sweet glaze-drizzled, currant-studded hot cross bun ($2). I savored its flavors of ginger and orange peel as I took my first pass around the booths.

Purveyors, mainly from the North Bay, included our own Dirty Girl Farms. The line was long at Primavera Mexican where corn tortillas are made on the spot. The wait was even longer at Rolli Roti where rotisserie chicken turned on long spits in the back of the truck. There was Pea Sprout Pesto from a vegan-raw deli, sustainably farmed Tomales Bay Oysters from Hog Island Oyster Company, bags of multi-hued potatoes, goat summer sausage, eerily shaped mushrooms, and aromatic smoked fish. Marin Sun Farms sold fresh meat, sausages, and a stock kit complete with chicken feet.

From Napa's Fatted Calf Charcuterie, I chewed on long fingers of old world sausage sec ($2). From the Coachella Valley came Flying Disk Ranch's eco-dynamic dates. I chose big, dark, sugary Medjools ($8/lb.) and milder tan Zahidi ($4/lb.). I picked a hefty one-and-a-half pound Olympia brown-skinned Asian pear ($3.25/lb.); white-fleshed, crisp and sugary, and a thick-skinned one-pound grapefruit ($1.25/lb.) crossed with a pomello for sweetness. The strong flavor of Petaluma's Point Reyes new blue cheese is perfect for salads. Also strong was Cowgirl Cheese's organic soft-ripened Red Hawk that puts Camembert to shame.

Although the round trip ($31) cost more than driving, the reposeful ride was worth it. But I was dismayed to learn that Caltrain is considering discontinuation of weekend and Giants' game service altogether on July 1, which is a huge blow to my personal environmental footprint reduction. Share your opinion at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .


Ferry Plaza Farmers Market, Embarcadero and Market Street, San Francisco. Tuesdays and Thursdays 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturdays 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Visit ferrybuildingmarketplace.com/farmers_market.php.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Reflecting Glass

Composer Philip Glass’ first trip to Big Sur was by motorcycle; little did he know that he’d establish a music festival there six decades later.

 

Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, occurs this year during Libra, the sign of creating right relations with all aspects life and with earth’s kingdoms. We contemplate (the Libra meditation) forgiveness, which means, “to give for another.” Forgiveness is not pardon. It’s a sacrifice (fire in the heart, giving from the heart). Forgiveness is giving up for the good of the other. This is the law of evolution (the path of return).

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of September 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Wurst Case Scenario

Venus Spirits releases agave spirit, Renee Shepherd on planting garlic, Sausagefest 2014, and wine harvest in full swing

 

Do you think you are addicted to technology?

Santa Cruz  |  Unemployed

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Apricot Wine for Dessert

Thomas Kruse Winery, a participant in the new Santa Clara Wine Trail, has been around for a long time—since 1971, to be exact. When our little group arrived to try some wine at the Kruses’ low-key tasting room, Thomas Kruse and his wife Karen were there to greet us. Theirs is a small operation, and they’re proud to offer quality wine at affordable prices. “Because we are small and low-tech, it’s easy to relate to the whole winemaking process,” says Karen—and the Kruses take pride in making wine “just like it has been made for centuries.”