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Himalayan Kitchen

foodieChef Purna Regmi on the secrets of Nepalese cooking

Nepal is a small country, but it has an interesting, unique cuisine that encompasses elements of surrounding India and China. Nepalese restaurants in the states are few and far between—and in Santa Cruz, they were non-existent until a month ago, with the opening of Himalayan Kitchen. The new restaurant, located on Pacific, doesn’t just serve Nepalese food; they have a large variety of Indian food on the menu as well. Their lunch buffet is a good place to start, as dishes from both cuisines are mixed throughout. GT spoke with chef Purna Regmi, and broke down several of his Nepalese and Indian dishes.

GT: Can you give me a brief description of Nepalese food for someone unfamiliar?

PURNA REGMI: Nepalese dishes are not spicy, and not a lot of oil is used when preparing. All ingredients are fresh and organic. The dishes we prepare in our restaurant adhere to these basic rules of preparing Nepalese food.

What is a momo?

Momo is a Nepalese dumpling with fillings, which can either be vegetarian or non vegetarian. The most popular fillings are meat (any kind/minced), potatoes and cheese and mixed vegetables. It is best served hot with special sauce made with fresh herbs and a blend of different spices. 

Sekuwa is roasted meat cooked on skewers, correct?

Sekuwa is a Nepalese dish cooked on top of burning coal and is filled with aromatic spices. It is cooked medium and is juicy and chewy.

You have several biryanis, but one is called the “special biryani.” What is that?

Special Biryani is a fried rice of sorts but with special tadka (a mixture of ingredients like ginger, garlic and bell pepper fried on hot flames) mixed together with special long-grain basmati rice. 

Of your handful of Nepali special combos, can you recommend one to me?

Himalayan Thali. It consists of daal (lentil soup), saag (spinach curry), rice, yogurt, and chutney. It can be either veg or non veg. The non veg Himalayan Thali comes with a chicken curry. The variety of flavors and spices makes the Himalayan Thali a must-eat.


810 Pacific Ave., Santa Cruz, 466-9878. PHOTO: CHIP SCHEUER

Comments (1)Add Comment
This place is great!
written by Darren, August 27, 2014
Himalayan Kitchen is serving up some delicious food. The new owners have certainly gone out of their way to provide a unique dining experience and making sure the customers are enjoying what they order. It's definitely worth a visit.

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Heart Me Up

In defense of Valentine’s Day

 

“be(ing) of love (a little) more careful”—e.e. cummings

Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

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