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Feb 09th
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Neighborly Noshing

dining_seabreezThe Seabreeze Cafe continues to fetch fans with its fresh and hearty homemade cuisine
In Linda’s Seabreeze Cafe, an exceptionally tidy eatery, breakfast is served all day. And that’s a good thing. With three-egg omelets ($7.75 to $8.95), you can choose between potatoes or fruit, and toast or a homemade muffin. From the grill comes French toast and plain, bacon, or almond waffles. Throughout the room, children in high chairs decorated coloring book pages with crayons, anticipating a Mickey Mouse Pancake ($2.25).

 

It’s perfect for homemade cuisine. Neon-colored lettering announces the daily specials from a mirrored board. Recently, the Linguiça Scramble ($8.95) included spicy sausage, mushrooms and green onions. The finely minced homemade salsa, fragrant with fresh tomatoes and cilantro, added additional heat. A heaping cup of fresh fruit included sweet melon, tart, seedless red grapes and fresh pineapple. The five-strip side of bacon ($3.95) was thin and crisp.

Scrambles are made with either eggs or tofu. The Greek ($7.95) combined a harmonious ensemble of salty feta, bright sautéed spinach, tomatoes, and sliced black olives. The blueberry muffin, its portabello-ish top overflowing the cup and lightly sprinkled with cinnamon-sugar, was moist and stuffed with plump berries.

Even during a mid-week lunch hour, there was a short wait. An array of fresh salads ($4.95 to $8.95) includes the Chef with freshly roasted turkey and a choice of four dressings. Turkey can also be added to the Stuft Cheese Sandwich ($6.75), which transforms a childhood grilled cheese into adult indulgence with the addition of tomato and avocado.

The ground chuck or garden burger selection ($6.95 to $7.75) includes a patty melt with grilled onions. As with the sandwiches, they are served with either a cup of the daily homemade soup, garden salad, or fries.

A piping hot cup of thick, puréed potato and leek soup was served with a crisp, crostini-like Parmesan crouton. Nicely tanned sourdough bread held the Tuna Melt ($7.75), overstuffed with white albacore mixed with crunchy celery and sweetened with gherkins. A tart mound of ridged pickle slices completed the presentation.

Whether you’re in the mood for something as light as the homemade granola, or a rib-sticking burger with sautéed mushrooms and onions, Seabreeze Cafe continues to quickly dish up fresh, homemade satisfaction.


Linda’s Seabreeze Cafe, 542 Seabright Ave., Santa Cruz, 427-9713. Open 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and Sundays 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visit seabreezecafe.com. 3 stars


On Saturday Sept. 19, the Santa Cruz Cancer Benefit Group presents its 6th Annual Gourmet Grazing on the Green in Aptos Village Park. Sample the fare from more than 40 chefs and vintners while enjoying lawn sports, music and a chance at raffle prizes.

Proceeds support the local beneficiaries of SCCBG, including Jacob’s Heart which provides support to children with cancer and their families, and WomenCARE, which helps women diagnosed with cancer, as well as their caregivers, understand the disease, cope with treatment, and heal.

Gourmet Grazing on the Green, presented by Santa Cruz Cancer Benefit Group, 465-1989. Noon to 5 p.m. Saturday Sept.19 in Aptos Village Park, 100 Aptos Creek Road, Aptos. Tickets $50 available online at sccbg.org/wine.htm or at any New Leaf Community Market.

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