Santa Cruz Good Times

Tuesday
Jan 27th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

He, She, Us

ae3Cabrillo Gallery’s new exhibit boldy explores gender themes
“Visibly Invisible: Art And Transgender Subjectivity” may be one of the most thought-provoking art exhibits of the year, but not for the reason you think. True, Cabrillo Gallery wins points for offering an innovative mix of mindbending artists and works that explore themes of transgenderism, but what stands out, truly, is the work itself, much of it downright dynamic. For starters, there’s an award-winning offering by photographer Jana Marcus with selections from her renowned  photodocumentary “Transfigurations.” That work turned heads a few years back. In fact, the show toured nationally and won many accolades. Marcus’ goal has been to shed more light on who transgender people are, a misunderstood subject the mainstream culture has often shadowed in mystery. Take note of how well the work dips into the waters of gender politics and how it explores what comprises masculinity and femininity.
The work of artist Sheila Malone is on hand, too. The photographic and digital video installation “RHO||FTM” follows the impact of “T,” the hormone Testosterone, on the biological “sex” and the “cultural gender” of her subject. Look for video, sound bytes and still photography.
Particulary interesting may be the paintings and drawings by Boston artist Cobi Moules. These works explore Moules’ own personal transition from female to male. The artist regularly paints and draws self-portraits documenting this transition, and here, there’s a selection of work from two larger series, “The Beard” and “Weight.” Watch for an inventive depiction of the hormomal changes in Moules’ body in these pieces.
The work of Maxx Sizeler, a New Orleans-based artist, may seem playful and colorful, but there’s a message in there, too. Sizeler’s shoes, toy cars, and the colors, pink, blue and yellow, are all elements used in his work to explore the relationship to gender and the body—shoes, for instance, function as a kind of pedestal for the body; the colors pink for “girl,” blue for “boy,” and yellow for “neutral.” Here, he uses it to represent everyone in-between.
The exhibit also boasts a film by San Francisco filmmaker Shani Heckman. Her humorous film Wrong Bathroom, blends humor with formal interviews that expose the battle for entry into gender-specific restroom spaces.
The entire exhibition is made possible in part by the Student Senate of Cabrillo College and Cabrillo College Student Services. Look for more in-depth coverage of this captivating exhibit in next week’s Good Times.

“Visibly Invisible” runs Oct. 1-29 at Cabrillo Gallery at Cabrillo College, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. The Opening Reception is 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30. A discussion with the artists is 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 6.  For more information, visit cabrillo.edu/services/artgallery/index.html.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Force of Nature

Santa Cruz’s Carlie Statsky brings her love of the natural world to the hyper-personal art of wedding photography

 

Mercury Retrograde in Aquarius

The magical time of Mercury’s retrograde cycle is here once again, until Feb. 11, and then some. The Mercury retro cycle actually lasts eight weeks when we consider its retrograde shadow, giving us six months a year for review. We know the rules of Mercury retro: Be careful with everything; cars, driving, money, resources, friends, friendships, groups, interactions, thinking, talking, communications. Avoid big purchases, important meetings and important repairs. Mercury retrograde times are for review, reassessment and rest. Our minds are overloaded from the last Mercury retro. Our minds need to assess what we’ve done since October—eliminating what is not needed, keeping what’s important, preparing for new information in the next three months (till mid-May). Mercury in Aquarius retrograde … we reinvent ourselves, seek the unusual, we don’t hide, we’re just careful. We live in two worlds; outer appearances and inner reckonings, with both sides of our brain activated. Yet, like the light of the Gemini twins, one light waxes (inner world), the other (outer realities) wanes. Like Virgo, we see what’s been overlooked—assessing, ordering and organizing information. It’s an entirely inner process. When speaking we may utter only half of the sentence. We’re in the underworld, closer to Spirit, eyes unseeing, senses alerted, re-doing things over and over till we sometimes collapse. Because we’re in other realms, we’re wobbly, make mistakes, and don’t really know what we want. It’s not a time for decisions. Not yet. It’s a time of review. And completing things. Mercury retro: integration, slowing down, resolution, rapprochement.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of January 23

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Bye Bye Benten!

Benten closing, plus Award-winning gin, a massive burrito and chocolate review

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Scanning the shelves of Deluxe Foods of Aptos, which carries an impressive selection of local and imported wines, I picked up a bottle of Trout Gulch Vineyards Chardonnay 2012, described as “a local favorite” by the busy market.

 

Cremer House

What’s old is cutting-edge again in Felton

 

How are you going to make a tangible difference in your community this year?

Spread more kindness and compassion.