Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Aug 28th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

He, She, Us

ae3Cabrillo Gallery’s new exhibit boldy explores gender themes
“Visibly Invisible: Art And Transgender Subjectivity” may be one of the most thought-provoking art exhibits of the year, but not for the reason you think. True, Cabrillo Gallery wins points for offering an innovative mix of mindbending artists and works that explore themes of transgenderism, but what stands out, truly, is the work itself, much of it downright dynamic. For starters, there’s an award-winning offering by photographer Jana Marcus with selections from her renowned  photodocumentary “Transfigurations.” That work turned heads a few years back. In fact, the show toured nationally and won many accolades. Marcus’ goal has been to shed more light on who transgender people are, a misunderstood subject the mainstream culture has often shadowed in mystery. Take note of how well the work dips into the waters of gender politics and how it explores what comprises masculinity and femininity.
The work of artist Sheila Malone is on hand, too. The photographic and digital video installation “RHO||FTM” follows the impact of “T,” the hormone Testosterone, on the biological “sex” and the “cultural gender” of her subject. Look for video, sound bytes and still photography.
Particulary interesting may be the paintings and drawings by Boston artist Cobi Moules. These works explore Moules’ own personal transition from female to male. The artist regularly paints and draws self-portraits documenting this transition, and here, there’s a selection of work from two larger series, “The Beard” and “Weight.” Watch for an inventive depiction of the hormomal changes in Moules’ body in these pieces.
The work of Maxx Sizeler, a New Orleans-based artist, may seem playful and colorful, but there’s a message in there, too. Sizeler’s shoes, toy cars, and the colors, pink, blue and yellow, are all elements used in his work to explore the relationship to gender and the body—shoes, for instance, function as a kind of pedestal for the body; the colors pink for “girl,” blue for “boy,” and yellow for “neutral.” Here, he uses it to represent everyone in-between.
The exhibit also boasts a film by San Francisco filmmaker Shani Heckman. Her humorous film Wrong Bathroom, blends humor with formal interviews that expose the battle for entry into gender-specific restroom spaces.
The entire exhibition is made possible in part by the Student Senate of Cabrillo College and Cabrillo College Student Services. Look for more in-depth coverage of this captivating exhibit in next week’s Good Times.

“Visibly Invisible” runs Oct. 1-29 at Cabrillo Gallery at Cabrillo College, 6500 Soquel Drive, Aptos. The Opening Reception is 5-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 30. A discussion with the artists is 6 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 6.  For more information, visit cabrillo.edu/services/artgallery/index.html.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

The Meaning of ‘LIFE’

With a new documentary film about his work, and huge exhibits on both coasts, acclaimed Santa Cruz nature photographer Frans Lanting is having a landmark year. But his crusade for conservation doesn’t leave much time for looking back

 

Seasons of Opportunity

Everything in our world has a specific time (a season) in which to accomplish a specific work—a “season” that begins (opportunity) and ends (time’s up). I can feel the season is changing. The leaves turning colors, the air cooler, sunbeams casting shadows in different places. It feels like a seasonal change has begun in the northern hemisphere. Christmas is in four months, and 2015 is swiftly speeding by. Soon it will be autumn and time for the many Festivals of Light. Each season offers new opportunities. Then the season ends and new seasons take its place. Humanity, too, is given “seasons” of opportunity. We are in one of those opportunities now, to bring something new (Uranus) into our world, especially in the United States. Times of opportunity can be seen in the astrology chart. In the U.S. chart, Uranus (change) joins Chiron (wound/healing). This symbolizes a need to heal the wounds of humanity. Uranus offers new archetypes, new ways of doing things. The Uranus/Chiron (Aries/Pisces) message is, “The people of the U.S. are suffering. New actions are needed to bring healing and well-being to humanity. So the U.S. can fulfill its spiritual task of standing within the light and leading humanity within and toward the light.” Thursday, Aquarius Moon, Mercury enters Libra. The message, “To bring forth the new order in the world, begin with acts of Goodwill.” Goodwill produces right relations with everyone and everything. The result is a world of progressive well-being and peacefulness (which is neither passive nor the opposite of war). Saturday is the full moon, the solar light of Virgo streaming into the Earth. Our waiting now begins, for the birth of new light at winter solstice. The mother (hiding the light of the soul, the holy child), identifying the feminine principle, says, “I am the mother and the child. I, God (Father), I Matter (Mother), We are One.”

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of August 28

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Land of Plenty

Farm to Fork benefit dinner for UCSC’s Agroecology Center, plus a zippy salsa from Teresa’s Salsa that loves every food it meets

 

If you knew you had one week to live, what would you do?

Make peace with myself, which would allow me to be at peace with others. Diane Fisher, Santa Cruz, Network Engineer

 

Comanche Cellars

Michael Simons, owner and winemaker of Comanche Cellars, once had a trusted steed called Comanche, which was part of his paper route and his rodeo circuit, from the tender age of 10. In memory of this beautiful horse, he named his winery Comanche, and Comanche’s shoes grace the label of each handcrafted bottle.

 

Cantine Winepub

Aptos wine and tapas spot keeps it casual