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Feb 13th
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Playing With Fire

Burning Man pioneer joins other local artists to present ‘A Festival of Fire and Light’ at the MAH
Spend an hour talking with local fire sculpture artist Lucy Hosking, and you’ll be inundated with stories about a childhood obsession with electronics and mechanics, making gunpowder as a teenager, working as a sound engineer for the Black Mafia in Philadelphia during young adulthood, and more recently, pioneering Burning Man.

A small sample of Burning Man culture—including Hosking’s well-known creative fire sculptures—will be exhibited at “GLOW: A Festival of Fire and Light,” on March 16 at the Museum of Art & History. The event will celebrate light, art, and performance, with glow-in-the-dark dances, flaming sculptures, LED light shows, and more.

The festival was conceived when a local artist, named Steve Cooper, pitched the idea to Nina Simon, executive director of the MAH. “It seemed like a good idea and a good challenge to figure out if we could make this happen in Downtown Santa Cruz,” says Simon. “So we’ve been working for a few months to coordinate the artists, work with the fire department, and work with the city to make sure that this is doable.”

In terms of the scale of the event, ambition is the name of the game. “We’re closing down Cooper Street and we’ll be having performances on the street,” says Stacey Marie Garcia, director of community programs at the MAH. “We’ll also have a series of fire sculptures and fire performances in Abbott Square and in our back patio, and then inside the building we’ll have a lot of digital art pieces; most of these are interactive. We’ll also have a blacklight room with a bunch of different crafting activities.”

Hosking’s contribution to the festival will be the renowned “Satan’s Calliope,” which mostly defies description, but is essentially a pipe organ that breathes fire. It sits on an electric golf cart, and is played by Hosking using a midi keyboard.

The idea for the piece came to Hosking during her first trip to Burning Man. “[In the] middle of my first day, I got out, walked around, and the place and things I saw put the idea for ‘Satan’s Calliope’ in my head,” she says. “I got all inspired; I came home, I bought a welder, raided all the surplus shops for materials and bought some new stuff, and started working on the darn thing and pretty much discovered I had created a monster.”

Now regarded as a pioneer of Burning Man, where “Satan’s Calliope” is a hit, Hosking—who lives and works in Santa Cruz—says, “I’ve blundered into something that is so much fun to do, and it just tickles people’s brains in a way that I have never seen anything else do. It certainly tickles my brain.” Citing a go-to phrase she uses to describe “Satan’s Calliope,” she says, “It’s art and science going gloriously wrong together in the service of fun.”

“Lucy is just brilliant,” says Cooper, who—in addition to dreaming up and assisting in the development of the festival—curated the fire art pieces. “She just thinks outside of the box in so many ways on how to incorporate fire into art, and then executes it in exquisite, precise fashion. It’s elegant the way she puts it all together.” Drew Detweiler programmed the contributions from the digital artists.

All of the participants of “GLOW”—fire or digital—are volunteering their time for the festival. And according to Garcia, this fact speaks volumes of the community’s dedication to the arts.

While all of the fire artists taking part are local, the Santa Cruz fire art community is influential beyond the city limits. “Even though we’re a small group of artists here in Santa Cruz, we actually have a pretty global reach, in terms of the events that use our flame effects, or people that have purchased them,” says Cooper.

Despite their broad influence, local fire artists very rarely get the opportunity to showcase their work in Santa Cruz, or to a non-Burning Man audience. “This will be a debut for all of these pieces together,” says Cooper. “This is the first time since Burning Man that these pieces have all been in one place at the same time.”

The festival affords a unique opportunity not only to the artists, but to attendees as well. “This is an opportunity to see art that you’ve never seen in Downtown Santa Cruz before,” says Simon. “You don’t have to be an art aficionado to love this. We’re trying to create events that give people a cultural experience that’s affordable, that’s fun, and that’s accessible for a whole family.”

Perhaps the event holds an even deeper, existential attraction. “Fire is one of those primal things,” says Cooper. “Even though we’re really sophisticated beings, we still love fire, and it goes back to those primitive roots. Very rarely do we get to see fire in full glory … here we have it now in a safe environment, on a canvas that allows it to be used artistically.”

Hosking, meanwhile, sees a like-minded collaborator in fire. “It’s always been one of the most fascinating things, just aesthetically, and spiritually, too; it represents something that is unique on this planet,” she says. “It’s just something I feel a deep species connection to.”

As such, Hosking has always been comfortable with fire, despite the potential hazards in her line of work. “I’m 59 years old and I can still count to 10,” she says, wiggling her fingers. “I’ve both been a little lucky and a lot careful.”

Hosking has also been wildly imaginative, as evidenced by her work. “The ideas to do this kind of stuff come to me unbidden,” she says. “I don’t look for it, it just wells up and kind of gets constipated in my head, and my head will explode if I don’t get some of them out into hard reality every now and then.”

“GLOW: A Festival of Fire and Light” takes place from 6-10 p.m. Friday, March 16, at the Museum of Art & History, 705 Front St., Santa Cruz. Tickets are $5/general, $3/students and children,
No Cover/MAH members. Rain or shine. For more information, call 429-1964. Photos: Keana Parker

Note: due to the rain we have extended the GLOW festival. Part 1 on March 16 will be indoors and focus on digital art. Part 2 on March 23 will be outdoors and focus on fire. Hope to see you at both!
 

Comments (5)Add Comment
musician/mechanical enthusiast
written by Clark Ferguson, September 08, 2014
Loved your Satan's Calliope! Will it ever come to the mid-Atlantic area and how can one find out if it will.?
...
written by Steve Cooper, March 18, 2012
The rain date for the fire portion is Friday, March 23rd.
...
written by Black Rock Bonnie, March 15, 2012
Missed out in the Burning Man Lottery for tickets this year sooo, looks like this might be the 2nd best thing to being out there on the Playa!!! Thanks so much.
...
written by Karen Jean Kefauver, March 15, 2012
Here's the update: Friday, March 16 and Friday, March 23
3rd Friday: GLOW, 6-10pm- UPDATE
You may have noticed that winter has found Santa Cruz this week which is great for our rivers and plants, but not ideal for fire art.

Don't worry though, all this rain can't put a damper on these brilliant artists and performers. We will still GLOW, and because of this rain delay we will get to GLOW for two Fridays in a row!

March 16th (tomorrow) will be indoors and will take over the Museum with glowing interactive digital art pieces throughout the museum, neon art, blacklight crafts, the science of GLOW with UCSC Chemistry Department and the Seymour Center, laser light shows and incredible digital art performances.

March 23 (next Friday) A fire-filled GLOW Part II will feature amazing flaming fire sculptures and fire performers from 7-10pm in Abbott Square.

And, if you come both nights you get twice the GLOW for one price- bring your bracelet from GLOW Part I and get into GLOW Part II FREE- and of course both events are free to MAH members so join now and come to all 3rd Fridays for free.

Join us for two back to back Fridays that light up downtown Santa Cruz.

$5 General Admission, $3 Students and Children, Free for MAH Members.
...
written by Stella, March 15, 2012
Is there a rain date?

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Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

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