Santa Cruz Good Times

Thursday
Apr 17th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

After The Storm

ae1-1UCSC professor presents stirring images of New Orleans pre-and post-Hurricane Katrina

UC Santa Cruz art professor Lewis Watts was preparing for a trip to New Orleans, La. for an Artist-in-Residency program when Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast in 2005. Determined to reach the city, the renowned photographer and archivist went to Memphis, Tenn., rented a car and drove 400 miles into New Orleans, which was only accessible by vehicle. He arrived six weeks after the storm passed through New Orleans and immediately began taking pictures of the damage and residents.

The resulting collection, in addition to photographs he has taken during his many trips to the city since 1994, is on display at the Mary Porter Sesnon Art Gallery at UC Santa Cruz now through Nov. 21, as part of a free exhibit entitled “Lewis Watts: New Orleans Suite.” “This is a look at New Orleans with Katrina as a frame of reference,” says Watts.

He vividly remembers the day he arrived in the storm-ravaged city.

“The first thing that hit me was that the damage, the devastation, was much worse than any photographs,” he says. “I had been following the New York Times and different places, and a lot of the photography didn’t translate completely. For a very short while I thought, ‘Well maybe I won’t photograph.’ But I did.”

In fact, he put in 10-hour days photographing for two weeks straight, and then left the city with what he describes as “disaster fatigue.”

“Fortunately when I went, I had connections from friends to people in the artist community,” says Watts. That gave him access to places in the city that were normally off-limits to out-of-town photographers.

ae-2In the above photograph, currently on display at the Sesnon Gallery, UCSC art professor Lewis Watts captures some of the Mardi Gras Indians during a celebration in New Orleans.Most of his photos—presented in black and white—were taken in film and then digitized and printed on paper to give them the look of conventional photographs. One of his most striking images is of a house that was completely destroyed by storm.

“This was during the two weeks when I first got there and there were a lot of photographers skulking around …  and they were not acknowledging each other,” Watts says of the photo. “But I saw a guy doing a pastel (of the house) in the Lower Ninth Ward and I walked up to him …  and when we were talking, this woman came up and her father had built this house by hand.” Watts’ photo captures the pastel painting in progress and the woman in front of the remains of the house.

Not all of the photographs in Watts’ exhibition focus on the disaster, however. Happier times were captured during his other trips to the city, including one instance in 2007 when a friend in the local art community invited him to experience Mardi Gras with a tight-knit neighborhood that wouldn’t normally welcome tourists. There, he was able to immerse himself in the culture and document things like the Mardi Gras Indians.

“At a certain point during the late 19th century, African Americans were not allowed to mask in carnival … so they would dress as Indians basically to get around that, and also in tribute to the fact that a lot of escaped slaves were given refuge by the Indians,” Watts explains.

A photo he took of the Mardi Gras Indians, which is included in the Sesnon Gallery exhibition, also appeared in the opening credits for the first season of the HBO series Treme, which follows a group of New Orleans natives as they rebuild their lives after Hurricane Katrina.

In addition to his New Orleans collection, there is an adjoining room in the Sesnon Gallery filled with color photographs that Watts took on a recent trip to Cuba. He points out that there are historical similarities between Cuba and New Orleans, including colonial influence by both the French and the Spanish. In addition, in Cuba, Watts found the same sort of mixture of races and cultures that he has experienced in New Orleans.

Watts shares the fear expressed by many whom he has met in New Orleans that the culture which makes the city so unique is in danger of being lost. With his exhibition, he hopes to help preserve it.

“I was there last fall, and the one thing I noticed is it seemed to be the closest to pre-Katrina that I’ve seen. Some of the FEMA marks and the marks from the storm are really starting to disappear,” says Watts. “On some level people are happy about that, but on another level they say that now people are forgetting about New Orleans … (and that) there are a lot of people that left that didn’t come back.” 


Lewis Watts: New Orleans Suite’ is on display through Nov. 21, at the Mary Porter Sesnon Gallery at UC Santa Cruz, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz. No cover. The First Friday curator’s walk-through will take place at 2 p.m. on Nov. 2. A special weekend event featuring Cuban music by Flor de Caña will take place at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 4. For details, call the gallery at 459-3606 or visit art.ucsc.edu/galleries/sesnon/current.  Photos: Lewis Watts

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Animal Magnetism

Bear, mouse dare to be friends in charming ‘Ernest and Celestine’ It’s not exactly Romeo and Juliet. It’s not even a romance, although it is a love story about two individuals separated by prejudice who find the courage to form an unshakable bond despite the rules and traditions that keep them apart.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.