Santa Cruz Good Times

Tuesday
Jun 30th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Mother Dearest

ae2-1MargaretStand-up comic Margaret Cho’s new one-woman show hits Santa Cruz

Actress, podcaster, Grammy nominee and internationally acclaimed stand-up comic Margaret Cho’s award-winning one-woman comedy shows have always addressed the tough issues she’s faced throughout her life. From her struggle to make it as a stand-up comic, to a self-deprecating body image, to drug and alcohol addiction, Cho has never shied away from tackling difficult topics with tact and humor.

Her fresh new show, entitled “Mother,” will be unveiled at The Rio Theatre on Nov. 30. It’s not, however, about the biological mother Cho has hilariously portrayed over the years. Instead, it’s about her newfound role as “mother” to an ever-growing generation of misfits and socially awkward malcontents—in other words, comedy fans.

“This show is not so much about my mother, but more about me becoming a mother of comedy, younger comics and giving birth to jokes,” Cho explains over the phone from Georgia, where she is filming Lifetime’s Drop Dead Diva. When it comes to jokes, Cho is one of the edgiest comedians to ever hit the scene.

Stand-up comedy experienced a golden age in the 1980s, when local sensations became international stars, but that trajectory peaked at the end of the decade. Needless to say, the likelihood of a young, pudgy Korean woman finding success in the male-dominated comedy scene of the ’90s, was a long shot. But Cho has never been one to take no for an answer.

“There are good and bad aspects, regarding gender in comedy, but it’s still tougher on women,” says Cho. “All I have ever really cared about is being able to work. I wish that there were more women around doing stand-up. I have always imagined that there would be a larger group of younger woman out there doing it, but I don’t think the comedy industry is that encouraging to women.”

ae2-2MargaretChoWhile that disparity is an unfortunate reality, it also gives female comics a sense of community. “I really bonded with Kathy Griffin, we really understand each other’s lives in a deep way—and that’s cool,” says Cho. “I ended up having an immediate connection with the ladies out there. I love the new girls, the new ladies like Amy Schumer, she’s really funny and really sharp. But being a female stand-up comic is a hard life.”

It may be a challenging career, but it’s also been a fruitful one for Cho. “Stand-up is all forms of entertainment concentrated into one thing—a very raw, base level connecting with people,” she says. “And if you can do that, you can do everything else.”

A Bay Area native, Cho has always treasured the San Francisco comedy scene. “I think it’s unique because it’s really about the craft,” she says. “I think there’s a real fluidity to the scene and you’re really encouraged if you are creative. There is a very nurturing scene if you have something to offer. Hacks get spit out. They don’t encourage mediocrity. It’s a very demanding community, so it’s a great place to develop as a comic.”

The Monterey Bay area has a unique scene of its own, according to Cho. “Santa Cruz is an interesting place to perform,” she says. “It’s very different than anywhere else in the world. It’s so liberal and alternative that it’s its own kind of universe.” 


Margaret Cho will perform “Mother” at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30 at The Rio Theatre, 1205 Soquel Ave., Santa Cruz. Tickets are $29.50. Adult material. Visit pulseproductions.inticketing.com.

Photo 1: missmissyphotography.net Photo 2: Austin Young

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

I Was a Teenage Deadhead

Memories of life on tour, plus the truth about that legendary Santa Cruz Acid Test

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Open Wide

Soif’s soft reboot leads to expanded menu, plus the ‘thinking woman’s ketchup’