Santa Cruz Good Times

Nov 29th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

The Ties That Bind

ae leadThe fourth annual ‘Looking Left’ dance festival is all about connections

What is connection? Is it tweeting and pinning and updating our friends with what we ate for breakfast? Is it a bond that occurs between people? Or is it a feeling that comes from within? The connection generated through dance is the theme explored at Motion Pacific’s upcoming showcase, “Looking Left.”

The festival, which takes place April 11-12, features performances of postmodern, contemporary and avant-garde dance. In addition, local dancers and members of the community without prior dance experience are invited to attend a series of workshops on April 11 as a part of the festival.

The brainchild of Cid Pearlman—local choreographer and co-producer of “Looking Left”—the festival is a collaboration of artists from Santa Cruz, the Bay Area, and as far afield as Los Angeles, created with the intention of exposing audiences to the innovative work of emerging and mid-career artists.

“I was interested in making a festival where I could bring artists whose work I was really excited about from outside Santa Cruz to the area, and then also introduce them to those audiences,” Pearlman says. “It’s a cross-pollinization of smart, creative rigorous dance that is engaging with big ideas.”

Each artist will perform for between five and 15 minutes, and explore themes as diverse as how feedback from others affects one’s artistic choices, and the relationship between mind and body and how it affects movement within our environment.

“One of the major themes that all of these artists are interested in is the complicated nature of what it takes to be in the world and in a relationship with other people,” explains Pearlman.

Among the participating artists is award-winning dancer and choreographer Gerald Casel, who will perform “Cragg and Tail”—an excerpt from his upcoming evening-length work, “Visiter,” which will debut at Motion Pacific in May. “The dance asks, ‘do we reside in our bodies, or does the mind allow the body to adapt to its environment? How do we navigate these porous boundaries?’” Casel explains.

Other artists performing in the show are Pearlman herself, Fog Beast, David King, Molly Katzman, Carol McDowell, and Christy Funsch, who was named one of Dance Magazine’s “25 to Watch” in 2014. Funsch’s piece, entitled “Impose Upon Me,” is a self-described dance solo that is interrupted by interfaces with other people.

“‘Impose Upon Me’ stems from a desire to bring conversation with trusted colleagues into my choreographic and performing practices,” says Funsch. “I invited two colleagues to respond to my raw movement beginnings. These responses are now becoming part of the work. ‘Impose Upon Me’ is deliberately thrust out of myself and, as such, is less internal and more relational.” 

What sets the festival apart, according to Pearlman, is the amount of artistic freedom that the performers are offered. “I give the artists a lot of freedom to do what they want,” she says. “So I choose them for who they are and not necessarily the pieces that they’re doing.”

Because the show is experimental in nature, the artists can present each piece in a very personal way. “Their work is very much like their work and not like anybody else’s, and that’s what makes it exciting to me,” Pearlman says. 

The ‘Looking Left’ dance festival will take place at 8 p.m. Friday, April 11 and Saturday, April 12 at Motion Pacific, 131 Front St., Santa Cruz. General: $18/adv, $20/door. Students and seniors: $16/adv, $18/door. For tickets and workshop information, visit

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger


Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share


Santa Cruz Gives

A look at the organizations we’re asking you to support in our new holiday giving campaign


Gratitude—For Each New Morning With its Light

The full moon of Wednesday brings light to Thanksgiving (Thursday) under the Sagittarius Sun and Mercury. Mercury in Sag offers humanity the message (Mercury) of thankfulness and joy (Jupiter). No other sign represents food, music and joy better than Sagittarius (only Pisces, when not in despair). Beginning on Thanksgiving, we can list what we’re grateful for. Then we can continue the list, creating a daily Gratitude Journal. What we are grateful for always increases in our lives. On Thanksgiving Saturn/Neptune square (challenging) is in full effect. This can manifest as traditions not being honored, disappearing, falling away. It can also create a sense of sadness, confusion, of things not working out as planned. It’s best to be as simple as possible. And to focus on gratitude instead. Gratitude is a service to others. It is scientifically and occultly a releasing agent. Releasing us from the past, allowing our future—the new culture and civilization, the new Aquarian laws and principles, the rising light of Aquarius, the Age of Friendship and Equality—to come forth. Gratitude and goodwill create the “thought-form of solution for humanity and the world’s problems.” The hierarchy lays great emphasis upon expressing gratitude. Gratitude illuminates all that is in darkness. Let us be grateful during this season together. Being, for others, the light that illuminates the darkness. A Poem by R.W. Emerson: We are grateful … “For each new morning with its light/For rest and shelter of the night/For health and food/For love and friends/For everything thy goodness sends.” (poem by R.W. Emerson). I am grateful for my family of readers.


The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program


Pluck of the Irish

Mid-century immigrant tale engagingly told in ‘Brooklyn’
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments


Second Street Café

Pies and tarts for all tastes—from traditional to adventurous


How are you preparing for El Niño?

Getting ready to buy some rain gear. Cory Pickering, Santa Cruz, Teaching Assistant


Fortino Winery

Cabernet and superb fruit wine from Fortino Winery


Tap Dance

West End Tap & Kitchen’s impressive menu to expand to Eastside location