Santa Cruz Good Times

Friday
Jul 31st
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Lymphedema

What is it? Patients with this frustrating disease speak out and offer help

Incoverlymphedema 2000, Stephanie Mungai received one of those pesky insect bites. Most people would just slap on some soothing balm and forget about it. But for Mungai, that was hardly the case. Within an hour her arm was red and puffed up to nearly an inch larger than its normal size. She had to rush to an emergency room.

Mungai soon learned that it was no ordinary insect bite. The doctors informed her that she had an infection in her lymph system, which was aggravated by the bite. “The infection comes from protein buildup in the lymph system and I was treated with antibiotics, sent home and suggested to go see a therapist,” Mungai says.

She did go see that therapist and soon found out that she had lymphedema, an uncomfortable illness that is often a byproduct of cancer treatment. A complicated, confusing and frustrating disease, in short, the visuals on it are that it typically swells extremities—at times, the trunk of the body—sometimes to severe degrees. Inflicted individuals go through much turmoil dealing with it and some of its treatments involve various types of massage, including some self-massage and in-patient treatments. They often have to wear constricting garments to control swelling. In addition, the condition can get worse at any time. And frankly, things never really get “better.” Once someone encounters lymphedema, it seems that it’s there to stay.

Finally, there’s one final lurking concern about lymphedema: You might not have it yet, but you may be in the 35th percentile that have gone through cancer treatments and are likely to get it.

Mungai was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1991 and underwent a lumpectomy. In addition, many of her lymph nodes were removed. And while she became cancer-free, she says that no doctors warned her that she would be susceptible to lymphedema. Hence the shock when she was diagnosed with it after that insect bite. Since then, Mungai has dealt with lymphedema in that same arm.

A similar thing happened to Michelle Shippen.

Shippen ended up having to deal with lymphedema years after she had gone through treatment for uterine cancer. She now deals with the headache and heartache that accompany lymphedema in her left leg.

“It’s a very challenging disease,” Shippen says. “It’s disfiguring and uncomfortable.”

Fortunately, there are support systems and bountiful resources set in place in Santa Cruz for people with lymphedema. Shippen has been involved with a support group through the Dominican Hospital Lymphedema Clinic. And on March 3, she and many others who deal with this disease will host a fundraiser to garner funds to provide things like compression garments for people whose insurance may not cover such items. (The timing comes just days before National Lymphedema Awareness Day, which is March 6.) All monies from the fundraiser will be poured into the Lymphedema Patient Support Fund.

A fashion show will also take place at the fundraiser/champagne luncheon. Models (actual people with lymphedema) will wear clothing options that compliment the body of someone who is dealing with lymphedema.

At press time, there were only a few tickets remaining, so the show is likely already sold out. Organizers, including Shippen, are hoping to raise $10,000.

“There are more people affected than I ever believed,” Mungai says. “[Support groups] are a good sharing mechanism to find out what new things are out there to help you.”

For more information about Dominican Hospital’s Lymphedema Clinic, call 457-7113. For more information about lymphedema, visit lymphnet.org. Pictured: Michelle Shippen.
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Health Screening

Santa Cruz wellness expert releases app to improve workplace well-being

 

Leo Sun; Full Moon, Venus Retro in Leo; Saturn Direct

It’s a complex week of planetary movements, challenges, demands and callings. We’re in the time of the Leo Sun. Leo—fixed fire, gold, the heart, generous, strong, noble, the king/queen—needs appreciation and praise from everyone in order to move forward. During Leo we gain a greater sense of self-identification by recognizing our creativity. It’s therefore a perfect time for Venus retrograding in Leo. In Venus retrograde we review and re-assess values. Venus retro in Leo concerns our self as valuable, acknowledging talents, gifts, abilities and offerings. Friday, Venus re-enters Leo (29 degrees, a critical degree) continuing the retrograde to 14 degrees Leo on Sept. 6. Friday (Full Moon) is also the (8 degrees) Leo solar festival, Festival of the Future. Leo is the heart of the sun, the heart of all that matters. When attuned to this heart, we have understanding and inclusivity. The heart of the Lion is Mitra (think “Maitreya,” the coming World Teacher). Leo prepares humanity to receive divine love from subtle sources and later to radiate that love to the kingdoms. Sirius, Ray 2, where love originates, streams through Regulus (heart of Leo), into the heart of the sun (Ray 2) and into all hearts. The heart of Leo is Regulus. Joining Venus, the love underlying all of creation appears. Saturday is Sun/Neptune (confusion or devotion) with late night Saturn turning stationary direct. Ideas, plans and structures held long in abeyance (since March 14) slowly move forward. (Read more on Leo and the week at nightlightnews.org and Risa D’Angeles’ Facebook page, accessed through my website.)

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Jailbreak with Reality

‘The Stanford Prison Experiment’ revisits one of the most notorious studies of all time
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Holy Cannoli

New bakery opens in Ben Lomond, plus Randall Grahm’s quest to grow 10,000 new grape varieties, and Mexican cooking classes

 

Is Santa Cruz turning into Malibu North?

It's got a ways to go before it gets wrecked like Malibu, but I think we need to be very careful about growth. Maria Mattioli, Santa Cruz, Psychotherapist

 

Bargetto Winery

A much-anticipated annual event at Bargetto Winery is the release of their very special La Vita red wine. June 7 was the day to be heralded this year, and I happily squeezed my car into their overloaded car park in eager anticipation of tasting the new La Vita nectar.

 

Margaritaville

Popular Capitola spot gets new owner and complete makeover