Santa Cruz Good Times

Oct 03rd
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Pirates of the Central Coast

lady washington_1A peek into life aboard the Pirates of the Caribbean ship

To hop aboard the Lady Washington is to take a step back in time. The 112-foot ship offers a glimpse into the life of sailors in the 1800s, with walk-on tours, sailing excursions and staff dressed in period clothing. The vessel, which is the official state ship of Washington, was docked in Moss Landing through today, Tuesday, Nov. 15.

The historically-accurate ship is a full-scale reproduction of the original Lady Washington, which was built in Massachusetts in the 1750s. In 1787, the original ship sailed around Cape Horn and became the first American vessel to land on the west coast of North America. The modern reproduction makes much shorter trips, sailing up and down the west coast and offering educational tours to local schools and other visitors.

In addition to providing tours, the Lady Washington has become a noted movie star. The ship made its move debut in 1994’s Star Trek: Generations and gained even more screen time in 2003, when it was featured in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl.

Although the Lady Washington is safe by modern standards, it operates much the same way the original did in the 18th century. The vessel is manned by volunteers and paid employees who live on the ship full-time. Brothers Seth and Jordan Little have been living and working aboard the Lady Washington and its sister ship, the Hawaiian Chieftain for almost six months.

“Life on a boat is very different,” says Jordan. “We’ve got 15 people living in a 2,000-sqaure foot house that floats.”

Seth works on the Lady Washington as a deckhand, a jack-of-all-trades position integral in maintaining and sailing the ship. Jordan is the vessel’s educational coordinator, responsible for planning the ship’s many tours for local schools at each port.

“Our chief mission is the education of children on what life was like to be a sailor 200 years ago,” says Seth.

Although the ship’s primary purpose is education, it also serves as an on-the-job training program for aspiring sailors. Because the ship is a certified sail training vessel, the crew members are able to gain valuable experience to prepare them for a career as modern-day merchant sailors.

“We learn how to sail the boat,” says Seth. “We learn everything from knot work, to on-sea etiquette, to how maintain the boat and how to work the rigging.”

For more information, visit


Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger


Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share


Making a Scene

As it celebrates its 30th year, Santa Cruz County’s Open Studios is one of the most successful in the country—and a make-or-break event for many local artists


A Ritual & Initiation

The Pope has come and gone, but his loving presence ignited new hope and goodness in many. While he was in NYC, China’s ruler arrived in Washington D.C. East (China) and West (Rome), meeting in the middle, under Libra, balancing sign of Right Relations. The Pope arrived at Fall Equinox. Things initiated at Fall Equinox are birthed at Winter Solstice. The Pope’s presence was a ritual, an initiation rite—like the Dalai Lama’s visits—offering prayers, teachings and blessings. Rituals anchor God’s plan into the world, initiating us to new realities, new rules. The Pope’s presence brings forth the Soul of the United States, its light piercing the veils of materialism. The Pope’s visit changed things. New questions arise, new reasons for living. A new wave of emerging life fills the air. Like a cocoon shifting, wings becoming visible. The winds are different now. Calling us to higher vision, moral values, virtues that reaffirm and offer hope for humanity. A changing of the guard has occurred. Appropriately, this is the week of the Jewish Festival of Sukkoth (’til Oct. 4), when we build temporary homes (little huts in nature), entering into a harvest of prayer and thanksgiving, understanding our fragile and impermanent existences. We are summoned to reflect upon our lives, our humanity, our nature, our spirit and each other. Offering gratitude, becoming a magnet for others. We observe. We see the needs. We love more.


The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program


Film, Times & Events: Week of October 2

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments


Extra Pop

Assembly’s pop-up space goes into regular rotation, Cabrillo wine dinner, and a visit to Mozaic


What’s your biggest pet peeve?

When people say they’re “going down” somewhere, and they’re actually traveling north. Julia Ragen, Santa Cruz, Psychologist


Downhill Cellars

An easy-drinking Chardonnay from Downhill Cellars


If whales have a message for humans, what might it be?

“Do not come in the water and join us.” Howard Hall, Santa Cruz, Retired