Santa Cruz Good Times

Sunday
Feb 14th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Show-Stopper

blog_Dave-RawlingsRawlings imports an element of surprise at Dawes’ recent concert in Santa Cruz

Remember when an encore was something a band had to earn? Most likely, you probably can’t. That’s because a standing ovation or a crowd calling for more, waiting in front of a stage while the rock star at hand walks off to the wings—oh so momentarily, has become a mundane ritual rather than a sign of rare, high regard. I often feel a sense of disappointment at the contrived nature of how show endings go off these days, wondering why bands end a set at all when they (and the rest of us) know that, whether or not anyone asks for it, they’ll pick up the mic and power through their amps for an additional few songs in straightforward form. Why bother walking offstage in the first place?

I can see the tombstone now: Encore as an element of surprise, may you R.I.P.

blog_DawesSo, it was a pleasant refilling of the well-of-faith, when Los Angeles’ The Band-meets-Springsteen-meets-Billy Joel ensemble, Dawes, finished its recent set in town at The Crepe Place on Friday, Feb. 5, with a true show-stopper. In the middle of the emerging quartet’s stellar album closer “Peace in the Valley,” singer Taylor Goldsmith looked to the side stage and said to a hidden figure standing behind a towering speaker, “Come on out here!” Then, like some mystifying ninja cowboy, a grand Dave Rawlings—tall, lean, and sporting his five o’clock shadow and Stetson hat, jumped over the Crepe’s soundboard and partition to land smack in the middle of the Dawes boys. It was certainly a sight to be seen—and heard.

Rawlings, mesmerizing guitar flatpicker and partner of Gillian Welch, had just left The Catalyst where he’d performed his own sweet set as the Dave Rawlings Machine (yes, I am spoiled and was there, too) and had headed to The Crepe Place for this final action of the evening. In rare electric guitar form, usurping Goldsmith’s axe for a searing solo that raised the final song to new heights, Rawlings had us all—even those who were unaware of his imposing status in the alt-country world—united in riled-up allegiance. When Rawlings finished plunging into great musical depths with the rest of the band backing, Goldsmith resumed the mic to announce, “Dave Rawlings—a legend!”

Whether it was all premeditated or not, who knows—it didn’t feel like it, and that’s what matters. It was an electrifying finale that had me smiling like it was my first concert, and I was thankful for the injection of spontaneity that made this encore all the more worthwhile. If there were any skeptics in the sold out venue at the start of the night, by that last song and surprise cameo, Rawlings certainly had them sold.

I headed home to hit my pillow thinking I’d witnessed something truly special, texting enough people along the way to share the moment. And I thought to myself, 'That’s how all show endings should leave you feeling.'

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Heart Me Up

In defense of Valentine’s Day

 

“be(ing) of love (a little) more careful”—e.e. cummings

Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of February 12

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Pub Watch

Mega gastro pub-in-progress at the Old Sash Mill, plus the best pasta dish downtown

 

How do you know love is real?

When you feel the groove in your heart and you’re inspired to dance. Becca Bing, Boulder Creek, Teacher

 

Temple of Umami

Watsonville’s Miyuki is homestyle cooking, Japanese-style

 

How would you stop people from littering?

Teach them from the time that they’re small that it’s not an appropriate behavior. Juliet Jones, Santa Cruz, Claims Adjuster