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Oct 24th
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Mind & Body

Blogs - Mind & Body

From India with Love

From India with Love

Light skin was not the only factor deterring others from noticing I was half-Indian while growing up; my lack of interest towards all Eastern cuisine, besides standard Chinese food, also did not seem to help. I have always treasured my mother’s classic Italian cooking and only barely stomached my father’s aloo gobi (Potatoes and cauliflower) and palak paneer (spinach and Indian cottage cheese). That is, until recently.

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Blogs - Mind & Body

Going Gluten-Free

Going Gluten-Free

Until recently, I had very little reason to ever think about gluten—or the fact that there are many people who cannot eat it. But this all came to my attention when I asked a friend what sort of baked good she would like for her upcoming birthday, and her only request was that it be gluten-free.

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Blogs - Mind & Body

A Less Traveled Trail

A Less Traveled Trail

A quick guide to finding one of Santa Cruz’s best trails

The best time to explore the trails on the UC Santa Cruz campus is during December, when the students are on their winter break, or during the summer, when they are gone for three months. This summer I have decided to take advantage of the peace that exists in the forests surrounding the campus, which can prove an elusive endeavor when surrounded by so many students.

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Blogs - Mind & Body

Why I Had to Give Up Milk

Why I Had to Give Up Milk

After finally coming to terms with it, I have recognized my lactose intolerance. I was first in denial since I love milk and cheese. I could go on eating all the cheese and drinking all the milk I wanted. That all had to end, though. This summer I had to let go of milk. I had to call it and tell it that it was over, that it wasn't him, but that it was me. I learned from Wikipedia that 55 percent of Mexican-American males are lactose intolerant. I also learned lactose intolerance is part of adulthood, your body just stops breaking down lactose. Not until the 1950s did scientists actually start studying the causes.

I had to suddenly learn how to live without milk, which surprisingly wasn't very hard. My parents drink Lactaid, a type of milk that does not contain lactose. It 's technically milk, it tastes like milk, it sounds like milk. It's also grabbed my curiosity for other types of milk. I've heard almond milk and chocolate soy milk are delicious. Turns out it isn't that hard to be lactose intolerant when a majority of people in the world are too.

Blogs - Mind & Body

AcroYoga in Africa

AcroYoga in AfricaLocal AcroYoga teacher prepares to teach in Kenya as part of the Africa Yoga Project
Santa Cruz’s only regular AcroYoga instructor is putting the finishing touches on her African travel plans. Amy Impellizzeri (elementalbalance.org) and fellow Santa Cruz yogi Rachel Sattinger (lovetokenya.org/about) have raised more than $10,000 for the Africa Yoga Project (africayogaproject.org), and will travel as ambassadors to Nairobi, Kenya next month. In Kenya they will embark on a five-week adventure full of teaching, learning, and traveling, as well a half-week walking safari to visit a school funded by the Africa Yoga Project.
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Blogs - Mind & Body

How I Began Shrooming

How I Began Shrooming

I was reading an article online about mushrooms and did you know that they are a great source of fiber, Vitamin D, protein, Vitamin B, copper, phosphorous, magnesium, potassium and zinc? The fiber helps lower cholesterol while Vitamin D helps with the absorption of Calcium. Mushrooms are 20-30 percent protein and 70-90 percent water, meaning you get the protein from meat with the calories of vegetables. Also the Vitamin B they hold are only found in meats, which makes it great for vegetarians. The article just went on and on about how nutritious they were.

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Blogs - Mind & Body

Who Needs Therapy? Dig a Labyrinth

Who Needs Therapy?  Dig a Labyrinth

The labyrinth, thousands of years old, is a one-pathway puzzle.  It has been used in the great Gothic cathedrals of Europe for ceremonial purposes, including spiritual and rites of passage rituals. It is a primal, pagan pattern and represents our journey to own center and back again into the world.

Right here in beautiful Santa Cruz at Seabright Beach on March 20, you will find Dean Pollard digging his quarterly labyrinth, celebrating the spring equinox. It takes him between 9 and 12 hours, with a little help.
PdeG: What is the meaning of a labyrinth?

PD: Birth, re-birth, transitions, healing, beauty, passage of time, spiritual growth, enlightenment, connection to source, rebirth, resurrection, emergence, evolution, progress, spiritual path, initiation.

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Blogs - Mind & Body

Labyrinth Man

Labyrinth ManDuring each solstice and equinox, at the mouth of the San Lorenzo River, the birthplace of surfing in this continental U.S., you will find Dean Pollard honoring the changes in the earth and sky, with his creation of labyrinths in the sand.  He starts from a center, plotting the design with his feet, performing his art with his body and shovel.  He aligns himself with a compass and rides his own fluidic wave in the tradition of the ancients, creating a spacial vortex between heaven and earth. This is performance art honoring seasons, transitions, and changes. Dean’s creative urge brings a level of consciousness and pattern for all of us to see.  Dean will be at Seabright Beach again March 20th for the Spring Equinox.  Check out his website: appliedeurythmy.com
Blogs - Mind & Body

Sat Nam

Sat NamThere is an email from Gurmukh Khalsa today.  This is not junk. I have received a personalized 40-day meditation!   I attended the San Francisco Yoga Journal Conference and took an intensive full day class with this beautiful yogi, dressed in white, from Los Angeles. I didn’t know much about her or about Kundalini Yoga, but had been curious for years.  Arriving early in San Francisco, I seized my spot in the yoga room.   She walked in with a sheepskin and a silk pillow. She had my attention. “Sat Nam,” were her first words.  The mantra (http://www.kundaliniyoga.org/mantra.html) means truth … say Sat Nam to anyone and it means I see the truth in you and you see the truth in me: truth is my identity … Divine truth. Kind of like “namaste,”
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Blogs - Mind & Body

Be Here Now

Be Here Now

As the 40th anniversary of the publication of BE HERE NOW is upon us, I decided to read the book, finally.  The changes that began in the coming-of-age 70s still affect the consciousness of our times.  Somehow, in 2011, the words of Ram Das are clearer, more profound and direct. (remdass.org)  The book itself is an early example of “interactive” media, as after the lengthy intro documenting Ram Das’ journey to a professorship at Harvard, the befriending of Timothy Leary, the excessive immersion in mushrooms and LSD, you then have to turn the book on it’s side to read the large typed message on the brown paper.  The different sized type and ink drawings seem to magnify the official communications of the book: “The next message you need is always right where you are.”

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