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Apr 19th
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The Ticker

Blogs - The Ticker

Watsonville Awarded Healthy Communities Grant

Thirty-six percent of Pajaro Valley Unified School District’s fifth, seventh and ninth graders are overweight or obese, according to the California Healthy Kids Survey. The Go For Health! Collaborative, an effort of United Way of Santa Cruz County, has just been awarded a $360,000 grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to address the health problems amongst youth in the Watsonville/Pajaro Valley area. Forty-one places across the country were selected as recipients of the grant as part of the foundation’s Healthy Kids, Healthy Communities initiative. Go For Health! plans to put the money to work increasing opportunities for physical activity and access to healthier foods—like the copious fruits and vegetables being grown in neighboring fields.

Blogs - The Ticker

UCSC Professor Tackles Time-Telling with Kid Klok

UCSC Professor Tackles Time-Telling with Kid KlokUC Santa Cruz cognitive psychology professor Dr. Dominic Massaro may be known for his “fuzzy logical” model of perception, his creation of Baldi, the computer animated talking head who can serve as a language tutor, and his formulation of various language learning products. But lately, Massaro has been revolutionizing the way kids learn to tell time.

While helping out in his son’s second grade classroom, Massaro observed some of the common errors children make while trying to tell time from an analog clock, such as reversing the hands or mistaking the Roman numeral II (meaning 10 minutes past the hour) as meaning two minutes past the hour. Armed with these observations and his knowledge of cognitive psychology, as well as the goal of making analog clock time-telling easy to learn, Massaro came up with the Kid Klock.
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Blogs - The Ticker

Voters Fight to Protect Local Services

Governor Schwarzenegger and the State Legislature are looking to take even more money from local governments this year (after taking controversial portions in 2009), but many Monterey Bay residents won't stand for it. The state government, politically unable to raise taxes, feels it is out of options with California's current budget deficit at about $20 billion dollars over the next 18 months. Trying to salvage valuable services, the Monterey Bay Division of the League of California Cities has announced a campaign to support a state-wide measure that would protect local services, and is shooting for it to be on ballots this November. They are currently gathering signatures and fear that any more cuts to local services would be disastrous for many institutions, including police, the fire department, and Transportation.

Blogs - The Ticker

Housing Authority Looks to Cut Water Waste

The Housing Authority of Santa Cruz is looking for new ways to fight an old problem. The group has announced that it is installing water meters in 213 rental units in 13 housing complexes that it operates between Santa Cruz and Watsonville.  Executive Director Ken Cole listened to suggestions that locals cut water usage by 15 percent, but expects the procedure to cut water usage by as much as 20 percent. The meters, which were paid for by last year's economic stimulus package, will not only make tenants more aware of their own water usage but also allow authorities to detect possible leaks.
Blogs - The Ticker

The Pink Umbrella Councilman?

One notorious Santa Cruzan is vying to snag one of three seats that will open up on the Santa Cruz City Council in November (those currently held by Mayor Mike Rotkin, Cynthia Mathews and Lynn Robinson): Robert Steffen, perhaps better known as “The Pink Umbrella Man,” has shed his infamous pink garb and announced his candidacy. It’s a little premature, but with such a quintessential Santa Cruz character already in the mix and more to surely follow, let the race begin!

Blogs - The Ticker

Santa Cruz Reduces Emissions

The city of Santa Cruz has successfully reduced its green house gas (GHG) emissions to 8 percent below levels in 1996. Residential homes showed the largest reduction in GHG emissions with a 29 percent reduction since 1996. The key actions responsible for this impressive decrease include purchasing efficient appliances and lights, installation of an estimated 2,170 kW residential solar photovoltaic panels, and conscientious lifestyle choices.
Blogs - The Ticker

Goodbye Sloppy Joe, Hello Granny Smith

On Wednesday, Dec. 15, Congressman Sam Farr introduced legislation that would greatly increase the amount of fruits and vegetables in our country's cafeterias. The legislation, the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Act (H.R. 4333), includes provisions to increase USDA spending on fruits, vegetables, and overall cafeteria infrastructure by more than $100 million over the next few years to promote health and combat childhood obesity. The proposed legislation also has a focus on promoting local foods via a farm-to-cafeteria program ($10 million per year for two years) which could simultaneously increase health and stimulate local economies.

Blogs - The Ticker

Goodbye Sloppy Joe, Hello Granny Smith

In Washington D.C. on Wednesday, Dec. 15, Congressman Sam Farr (D-Carmel) introduced legislation that would greatly increase the amount of fruits and vegetables in our country's cafeterias. The legislation, the Children's Fruit and Vegetable Act (H.R. 4333), includes provisions to increase USDA spending on fruits, vegetables, and overall cafeteria infrastructure by more than $100 million over the next few years to promote health and combat childhood obesity. The proposed legislation also has a focus on promoting local foods via a farm-to-cafeteria program ($10 million/year for two years) which could simultaneously increase health and stimulate local economies. "The federal government talks about the food pyramid and healthy eating, then spends billions on unhealthy food," said Congressman Farr after introducing the bill. "It's time we put our money where our mouth is and address the poor quality of food in our schools."

Blogs - The Ticker

Introducing EcoCoupons

SANTA CRUZ - Twenty-four-year-old Eric Ressler, with a little help from his folks, has just launched a new online service that will benefit his fellow Santa Cruz residents, local businesses, and the environment: the site is ecocoupons.org, and it’s all about paperless coupons. Instead of receiving piles of coupons in the mail (and constantly throwing them away) ecocoupons.org allows its visitors to select what coupons they want, when they want them, and then download them to their phone or another mobile device. The project is endorsed by the Downtown Association and has more than 30 local businesses participating so far.

Blogs - The Ticker

H1N1 Public Option

As of Thursday, Dec. 10, vaccinations for H1N1 have been available in Santa Cruz County to the public beyond target groups, or those at highest risk from the disease, due to improved availability and the belief that many in the target groups have already been vaccinated. 56,290 doses of the vaccine have arrived in Santa Cruz County as of Dec. 7, an additional 12,000 on top of what was expected.  Public Health has administered over 9,000 vaccinations to those in target groups and has held four walk-in clinics. "We are committed to provide this vaccine as soon as possible to those who want it," says Health Officer Dr. Poki Namkung. For more information visit Santa Cruz Health Center, 1080 Emeline Ave. or call (831) 454-4574.

 
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Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
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Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?