Santa Cruz Good Times

Monday
Mar 30th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Whose City?

blog_slug_city1UCSC Event Explores Ties Between Labor and the ‘Right to the City’
Whose City? Labor and the Right to the City Movements, an all day conference on Saturday, Feb. 26 on the UC Santa Cruz campus, opened with a large crowd filling the 300-seat Humanities Lecture Hall to capacity.

The event was a joint effort between the university’s Center for Labor Studies and Urban Studies Research Cluster, and was aimed at discussion of the history of and challenges facing emerging coalitions between workers, environmentalists, and urban social movements.

The event brought together theorists and activists from the Central Coast and across the country, including keynote speaker and Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York, David Harvey. Harvey is the author whose defining 2008 article “The Right to the City”, published in New Left Review, inspired this event, and many others like it internationally.


In his article, Harvey writes, “It is a right to change ourselves by changing the city more after our heart's desire … the freedom to make and remake ourselves and our cities is one of the most precious yet most neglected of our human rights.”

Cindy Hernandez, a fourth year anthropology major at UCSC, heard about the event through one of her classes and came to hear Harvey's presentation.

“I was excited to hear David Harvey would be speaking on our campus, he's one of the biggest names in talking about these issues … It was interesting to [hear] how these theories and discussions were applied,” says Hernandez. “Its about the redefining of what it means to be a citizen and to have the city as an aspect of human rights.”

The event also featured two panel discussions and a screening of the short documentary film "Fine Print: Un Robo Legal" by the UCSC student organization Border Stompers.
Miriam Greenberg, director of the UCSC Urban Studies Research Cluster and associate professor of sociology, says that the discussion focused on areas of intersection and coalition between groups working on housing, environmental, immigrant and workers issues and ranged from issues specific to communities like Santa Cruz to broader national and global struggles.

“It's not just about getting resources, it's about having a voice, a democratic process and not one simply driven by powerful interests,” says Greenberg.
The event, which was free and open to the public, was the third and largest event sponsored by the Urban Studies Research Cluster so far this academic year.

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Best of Santa Cruz 2015

In 40 years of publishing, Good Times has seen a lot of “bests.”

 

Spring Triangle: Three Spring Festivals—Aries, Taurus, Gemini

The Spring signs Aries, Taurus and Gemini constitute a triangle of force that sets the template for the nine signs that follow and the template for the entire year (Spring 2015 - Spring 2016) ahead. Aries initiates new ideas, Taurus stabilizes the new thinking of Aries and Gemini takes the initiating stabilized ideas of Aries/Taurus and disperses them to all of humanity. It is in this way that humanity learns new things, with the help of Mercury, the messenger. As Spring unfolds, three elements emerge: the Fire of Aries (initiating new ideas), the Earth of Taurus (anchoring the ideas of God through Mercury) and the Air of communicating Gemini. These three signs/elements are the Three Spring Festivals. They are the “triangle of force” forming the template (patterns) of energy for the upcoming new year. After these three we then have the soothing, calming, warming, nurturing and tending waters of the mother (Cancer). Cancer initiates our next season under the hot suns of summer. Planets, stars and signs create the Temple of Light directing humanity towards all things new. March 29 is Palm Sunday, when the Christ, World Teacher, was led into Jerusalem (City of Peace) on a donkey (humility). Palms waving above His head, signified recognition of the Christ’s divinity. Palm Sunday is the Sunday before the Easter (Resurrection Festival). Palm Sunday begins Holy Week, the week of capture, imprisonment, passion, sacrifice, crucifixion, death and resurrection of the christ. All events in the Christ’s life represent events (initiations) that humanity experiences through many lifetimes. We turn our attention to these holy events this week. Their concepts portray and reveal to us greater spiritual understanding. Then, Aries, the “light of life itself” shines through us.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Best of Santa Cruz 2015 Editor's Picks

BEST NIGHT CAP WARSAW MULE AT SHADOWBROOK
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Spring Spirits

Sean Venus’ gin straight up, remembering Rosa’s and a tasting of Hungarian wines

 

What’s your favorite most recent outdoor discovery in Santa Cruz?

A hike that’s across from Waddell Beach. I didn’t realize you could go across the highway and do a super simple loop, and it’s beautiful. You can see the coastline. Liz Porter, Santa Cruz, Community Outreach

 

Martin Ranch Winery

Muscat 2012

 

Front Street Kitchen

Pop-up spot attracts paleo crowd with locally sourced low-carb meals