Santa Cruz Good Times

Wednesday
Apr 16th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

The Ninety-Nine Percent

occupy_bankFRESH DIRT > Occupy Santa Cruz protestors rally for national and local causes

A man dressed up like a Wall Street banker, wearing a wrinkled button down shirt, khakis and sneakers, wheels a speaker system out of a car parked in front of the Santa Cruz Courthouse.

Someone else speaks into a megaphone, “Alright everyone, let’s march!”

The gathering was a “Corporate Ball” themed march organized by the Occupy Santa Cruz protestors on Wednesday, Oct. 12. About 75 participants marched through Downtown Santa Cruz, blasting music and chanting in unison as they stopped at the three major bank branches in the area—Chase, Wells Fargo, and Bank of America.

The Occupy Santa Cruz protestors first gathered one week ago in solidarity with the Occupy Wall Street movement. Both groups hope for increased taxes on corporations and the wealthy, greater scrutiny on large banks, and higher wages for the average American worker.

“I think we’re on the same page, completely,” says Susan Worth, 51.

occupyBut some of the Santa Cruz protestors also have local demands on their minds—such as overturning the city’s sleeping ban.

“Fundamentally, I think [the movements] are the same,” says Sita Jones, a 22-year-old massage therapist. “But what a lot of us are trying to do, for Santa Cruz, is to get rid of the sleeping ban to help out the homeless a little bit more.”

The Santa Cruz sleeping ban prohibits people from sleeping outdoors and in cars between 11 p.m. and 8:30 a.m. Violators, who are largely members of Santa Cruz’s homeless population, can be issued tickets or receive a misdemeanor charge.

“I got five tickets in one week,” says Lawrence McGregor, 40. “I hope the changes that are happening now might help the homeless more. We have a lot of street people here and the cops just want to give us tickets every time.”

Occupy Santa Cruz will hold a “Rally for Global Change” on Saturday, Oct. 15, in conjunction with protests in more than 950 different cities. Protestors will meet at noon at the Santa Cruz Courthouse and a march will begin at 2:30 p.m.


Photos by Irena Eaves (top) and Keana Parker (bottom).

 

Comments (6)Add Comment
...
written by But really !, October 17, 2011
Getting rid of lobbyists, well that's a start. Our leaders are corrupted by corporations, influence pedaling and campaign contributions. Too bad these protests are also being corrupted by the substance addicted bums of Santa Cruz.
...
written by J Carl, October 16, 2011
How shallow of the Good Times to take this "movement" and report it as if it were a "homeless" issue. Shame on you.
...
written by jay1948, October 15, 2011
Lets get to the lowest common demonator...all the country's financial problems comes down to special interests, lobbyests and the criminals in public office that take bribes to vote for corporate breaks in stead of voting for the well being of the USA. Get rid of the lobbyests, then we'll see political public servents that work for the public, not wall street.
...
written by XDem, October 15, 2011
The Huffington Post reported the the numbers of protestors in New York "swelled to about 2000", there were no more than 75 demonstrators in Santa Cruz. Your photo at Chase showed 2 protestors.

$1 ice cream cones at Baskin-Robbins draw larger crowds.
...
written by XDem, October 15, 2011
It is presumptuous of these idiots to claim to represent 99% of the people. While factually, I am not a member of the 1%, I vociferously reject being included in their 99%. There are probably hundreds of millions of citizens who would agree.

If you amassed all the left wing loons participating in these demonstrations, they wouldn't total 1% of the population. Showing the same 1000 protestors on tv time and time and time again doesn't add up to a mass protest.
...
written by Try Again, October 15, 2011
Pick a subject and protest it. Come up with a solution and propose it. You cant just complain and say make things better. Its too broad and nothing will get done. Protesting in front of local business accomplishes nothing. The people who work there are part of the "99%." They are not rich. They have gotten rich off of no one. They have bills and are trying to stay alive like the rest of us. Harassing them and the customers of these banks just makes you look bad. Peaceful protest you say, That is not what I saw when I went in to do a deposit.

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Aries Solar Festival

Sunday is Palm Sunday. Symbolizing victory and triumph, paradise, sacrifice and martyrdom, the Pisces World Teacher entered Jerusalem (City of Peace) on a donkey (signifying humility).

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Animal Magnetism

Bear, mouse dare to be friends in charming ‘Ernest and Celestine’ It’s not exactly Romeo and Juliet. It’s not even a romance, although it is a love story about two individuals separated by prejudice who find the courage to form an unshakable bond despite the rules and traditions that keep them apart.

 

Printer's Devil

Iconic editor Buz Bezore, who died last month at the age of 68, left a huge mark on Santa Cruz journalism   Eventually, it’s all a blur. You live long enough, and maybe a little too hard at times, so that when you hit the rewind button of faded memory, it moves so fast that you can hardly sort and gather the details. One scene skips to the next, and to the next, without proper editing or sequencing. Chronologies get distorted. Which came first: stealing the chickens or coloring the eggs?
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.