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 slugreportSLUG REPORT > UCSC named seventh best university under 50 years old

UC Santa Cruz recently placed seventh on a list of the top 100 public and private international universities younger than 50 years old.

The UK-based list, titled the Times Higher Education 100 Under 50, aims to identify the rising stars of the new global university system. Of the 100 universities listed, only two U.S.-based universities (UC Irvine and UC Santa Cruz, both established in 1965) placed in the top 10, with East Asian countries dominating the list (South Korea’s Pohang University of Science and Technology snagged the top spot).

According to a report by Phil Baty written for Times Higher Education, the selection had specific aims in mind.

“The analysis is about a new breed of global universities—those that have already managed to join the world’s top table in a matter of years, not centuries, and others showing great promise, institutions that could reach the top, in time,” says Baty’s report.

UCSC Chancellor George Blumenthal sees the school’s ascent as natural, and a reflection of recent reports placing UCSC at or near the top of world research impact rankings.

“It proves what I’ve often said: UC Santa Cruz continues on an upward trajectory,” says Blumenthal.

The criteria used to rank the universities are largely the same as those used by Times Higher Education for their annual international university rankings (such rankings are predictably dominated by venerable British and American institutions like Harvard and Oxford). But an important change was made for the 100 Under 50 rankings: the importance of subjective indicators of academic prestige (e.g., extensive alumni networks) was greatly reduced, from one-third of the score to one-fifth.

“It was agreed that an analysis of younger institutions, designed to examine future potential as much as current excellence and to move away from heritage or legacy, should be based more on hard, objective performance indicators,” said a Times Higher Education Report that explained their ranking methods.

In a February 2012 article for the site Inside Higher Education, Daniel Lincoln, a visiting scholar at the Centre for International Higher Education, has this to say: “Picture the year 1640. You are an educated, upper class Englishman, having a hearty laugh with your mates in London at the news that those religious fanatics in the colonies have now ‘founded’ their own university in Boston, led by the benefaction for a certain John Harvard—priceless. A few generations later, I’m guessing no one was laughing.”

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Heart Me Up

In defense of Valentine’s Day

 

“be(ing) of love (a little) more careful”—e.e. cummings

Wednesday (Feb. 10) is Ash Wednesday, when Lent begins. Friday (Feb. 12) is Lincoln’s 207th birthday. Sunday is Valentine’s Day. On Ash Wednesday, with foreheads marked with a cross of ashes, we hear the words, “From dust thou art and unto dust thou shalt return.” Reminding us that our bodies, made of matter, will remain here on Earth when we are called back. It is our Soul that will take us home again. Lent offers us 40 days and nights of purification in preparation for the Resurrection (Easter) festival (an initiation) and for the Three Spring Festivals (at the time of the full moon)—Aries, Taurus, Gemini. The New Group of World Servers have been preparing since Winter Solstice. The number 40 is significant. The Christ (Pisces World Teacher) was in the desert for 40 days and 40 nights prior to His three-year ministry. The purpose of this desert exile was to prepare his Archangel (light) body to withstand the pressures of the Earth plane (form and matter). We, too, in our intentional purifications and prayers during the 40 days of Lent, prepare ourselves (physical body, emotions, lower mind) to receive and be able to withstand the irradiation of will, love/wisdom and light streaming into the Earth at spring equinox, Easter, and the Three Spiritual Festivals. What is Lent? The Anglo-Saxon word, lencten, comes from an ancient spring festival, agricultural rites marking the transition between winter and summer. The seasons reflect changes in nature (physical world) and humanity responds with social festivals of gratitude and of renewal. There is a purification process, prayerfulness in nature and in humanity in preparation for a great flow of spiritual energies during springtime. Valentine’s Day: Aquarius Sun, Taurus moon. Let us offer gifts of comfort, ease, harmony, beauty and satisfaction. Things chocolate and golden. Venus and Taurus things.

 

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