Santa Cruz Good Times

Saturday
Apr 19th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Reaction To The Crackdown

candlelight vigil2Homeless and allies take to the streets for a candlelight vigil

A candlelight vigil protesting the recent crackdown and clearing out of homeless camps by the Santa Cruz Police Department made its way through Downtown Santa Cruz on Friday night, Sept. 7, with the aim of raising awareness about those with no other option but to sleep outside. About 60 homeless people, homeless activists and sympathizers gathered in front of City Hall, formed an orderly procession through downtown, paid a visit to the levy of the San Lorenzo River that has recently been cleared of all homeless camps, and returned to City Hall, hearing speeches and testimonials along the way.

The SCPD, aided by the city’s Public Works and Parks departments, is now in the eighth week of its intensive effort to clear out homeless camps and arrest anyone involved in criminal activity. By law enforcement standards, the task force has been successful: 75 homeless camps have been cleared, 126 arrested, and 378 citations issued as of Sept. 1, according to Deputy Police Chief Steve Clark. “It’s time to return these open spaces to their intended uses to the citizens of Santa Cruz,” Clark says. “It’s our job to make it as inconvenient as possible to engage in criminal activity, and this project has been successful doing that.”

The concept of “criminalizing homelessness,” as well as alleged profiling and selective targeting of homeless people by police, was discussed by participants at the candlelight vigil. These topics were sometimes raised in anger, but more often in terms of the need to reach out to the larger community to promote more compassion and understanding. 

Becky Johnson, from the Homeless United for Friendship & Freedom (HUFF), taped a letter to the door of the Parks and Recreation Department that stated, “These raids, conducted during an obvious shelter emergency, are unproductive, a waste of public resources, and in light of the lack of legal shelter available to these people, inhumane.” The letter concluded with an invitation to city officials to attend HUFF meetings for a “civil dialogue in an open process.”

Clark feels he has the full support of the larger community for the crackdown, as shown by more than 20 emails and dozens of phone calls he says he has received that express appreciation since the Task Force got started. “The community response underscores the magnitude of the problem, and it was worse than we thought,” Clark says. “Many of the so-called homeless have hijacked our public open spaces and turned them into criminal hideouts.”

Pastor Steve of the Circle Church gave an invocation to the crowd before the march got started, urging an intention of nonviolence. “Gandhi once said that anger and intolerance make correct thinking impossible,” he told the crowd, “and to that I would add fear ... I’ve noticed almost everyone I’ve talked to lately is operating from an energy of fear—that’s not an intention that’s going to create constructive solutions.

“What the police are doing is cracking down on the symptoms of a much larger problem, and in so doing simply making the problem worse,” he continued. “I would love to work with the city council in addressing the causes, in terms of more affordable housing, drug treatment and mental healthcare.”

Spokespeople on both sides of the controversy say their opponents are working from biased and inaccurate stereotypes. “I think the organizers of this demonstration are confusing legitimate folks who are down and out and struggling to get on their feet, for whom services are available, with a criminal element that the community needs protection from, not to mention the environmental degradation of our open spaces,” says Clark.

Ben, 33, who has been living “outdoors” in Santa Cruz for more than a year and wouldn’t give his last name, says he was displaced twice in the last few weeks, and managed to avoid getting cited for illegal camping by simply moving on as soon as a warning was issued. “I haven’t seen any hard drug use,” Ben says. “The worst crime is leaving trash, and I’ve tried to get other homeless people to clean up their act. Most of us are just exhausted from the harassment, we always have to be on guard, and all we want is safe place to sleep.”

Comments (7)Add Comment
...
written by Donny B, September 12, 2012
Thank you SCPD and Parks and Recreation Department. I will be nice to visit City Parks without having to worry about being accosted by homeless people looking for handouts or having to put up with their trash.
...
written by Colin Clyde, September 11, 2012
All you haters should hang your heads in shame. This policy might give you a cathartic sense of stickin' it to those bums, but in reality, where the rest of us live, it doesn't anything to fix the systemic problem of mass unemployment. The money that was spent on these raids could have been spent on helping people acquire housing and jobs.
Oh, and the cop thinks he's got community support because the usual suspect vocal minority of hateful people emailed him? Somehow I don't think that qualifies as a representative sample of the general population, eh?
...
written by Dick Army, September 10, 2012
I just love the work our police are doing. Keep up the good work!
...
written by Roger Farr Jr., September 10, 2012
I think they should continue the sweeps. Alot of the homeless make it their lifestyle and not just being a victim of circumstances. I recently stopped by a local sandwich shop and bought a sandwich for a homeless man that was holding a sign saying "homeless please help" I figured he could use the food but when I gave it to him, he looked at me and asked what the hell is this. I told him I felt sorry for him and was trying to help. He then told me to keep the sandwich and give him the 8 bucks instead. I will NEVER again try to help the homeless again!!!
...
written by Redding Homeless, September 09, 2012
Why You Should NEVER Support Regulating the Public Feeding of Homeless People

http://reddinghomeless.blogspot.com/2012/09/why-you-should-never-support-regulating.html
...
written by Greg Martin, September 09, 2012
Keep up the good work SCPD!
...
written by Ronald Hughes, September 09, 2012
Thank you, SCPD, for your hard work in identifying, citing and arresting those individuals involved in criminal activity, including stealing, illegal drug sales, pimping, etc. Such criminal behavior is the biggest threat to our innocent homeless population, well as to our community at large. Keep up the good work, and don't let the turkeys (a small but vocal minority) get you down!

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of April 17

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >

 

Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.
Sign up for Tomorrow's Good Times Today
Upcoming arts & events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.

 

Waddell Creek, Al Fresco

Route One Summer Farm Dinner You’ve been buying their insanely fresh produce for years now at farmers’ markets. Right? So now why not become more familiar with the gorgeous Waddell Creek farmlands of Route One Farms?