Santa Cruz Good Times

Monday
Apr 27th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

Students Make Waves Over Spring Break

blug_slugCALPIRG students travel the coast to ban Styrofoam
This spring break, 50 California Student Public Interest Research Group (CALPIRG) students took to the beach to draw attention to plastic pollution and to encourage banning polystyrene. The “Wave of Change” tour kicked off Sunday, March 21 with a beach cleanup at San Diego’s Ocean Beach Pier, and will end in Sacramento this Thursday, March 25.

Part of a network of college student groups opposing rising college costs, advocating for the California High-Speed Rail Initiative, and protecting the coastline, CALPIRG hopes to focus on the latter by helping pass a statewide ban on Styrofoam takeout containers. They planned this tour of the California Coast “to shine a spotlight on the garbage that dirties our beaches and show the support of local communities, and legislators for a Styrofoam ban,” according to their website.

Beach cleanups are organized at many of the tour’s seven stops (San Diego, Newport Beach, Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, San Francisco, and Sacramento), along with meetings with public officials and press conferences, where students and community leaders will talk about the threat plastic pollution poses to our oceans and why they believe the answer lies in a statewide ban on single-use, polystyrene take-out containers.

California has some of the most beautiful beaches and coast in the entire world, but many of them are affected by plastic pollution. There is a pile of trash 1,000 miles off the coast of California that is twice the size of Texas. Not only is plastic pollution an eyesore, it endangers marine life and is frequently mistaken for food by birds and sea mammals.

“One of the worst forms of plastic pollution is Styrofoam,” according to CALPIRG’s website, “specifically single-use take-out containers. Styrofoam breaks into smaller and smaller pieces but never fully biodegrades. It is almost impossible to recycle.” 

The Wave of Change tour passed through Santa Cruz on March 23, and several elected officials joined the students in cleaning the beach and recording the types of trash they found—mostly plastic in various forms.

The City of Santa Cruz has already banned the use of Styrofoam, but city officials urged other cities and the state to do the same. Santa Cruz Mayor Mike Rotkin was one of the speakers at a press conference held after the beach cleanup. “Although the City of Santa Cruz has already banned the use of Styrofoam, we all share one ocean,” he said. “If we are going to stop the negative impacts of Styrofoam on our environment in general, and specifically on marine life in the Monterey Bay and the ocean, it will take action at the state level to effect that outcome.”

The final stops on the tour will be the Berkeley Marina for a press conference and a lobby day on Capitol Hill in Sacramento.


To see the full itinerary, visit the tour’s page: calpirgstudents.org/spring-break-tour

Comments (1)Add Comment
отзыв на этот пост
written by GennadijKulakov22, January 01, 2011
аренда микроавтобусов.пассажирские перевозки,прокат-заказ автобусов и микроавтобусов,Киев

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

We Can Rebuild You

A look back at how downtown Santa Cruz recovered from the 1989 earthquake

 

International Earth Day—Mother Earth Day

Every April 22, humanity celebrates International Mother Earth Day and Earth Day. As more than a billion people participate in Earth Day activities every year, Earth Day has become the world’s largest civic observance. The massive concern to build right relations between humanity and the living being we call Earth is evidence of humanity’s love of the Mother. In 2009, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed April 22 International Mother Earth Day, with a significant resolution affirming “the interdependence existing among human beings, other living species (the kingdoms—mineral, plant, animal and human) and the planet itself, the Earth which we all inhabit.” The Earth is our home. Celebrating Earth Day helps us define new emerging processes (economic, social, political) focused on the well-being of the kingdoms. Through these, humanity seeks to raise the quality of life, foster equality and begin to establish right relations with the Earth. We dedicate ourselves to bringing forth balance and a relationship of harmony with all of nature. Learn about planting a billion trees (the Canopy Project); participate in 1.5 billion acts of green. Disassociation (toward Earth) is no longer viable. We lose our connection to life itself. Participation is viable—an anchor, refuge and service for all of life on Earth. Visit earthday.org; harmonywithnatureun.org; and un.org/en/events/motherearthday for more information. From Farmers Almanac, “On Earth Day, enjoy the tonic of fresh air, contact with the soil, companionship with nature! Go barefooted. Walk through woods, find wildflowers and green moss. Remain outside, no matter the weather!” Nature, Earth’s most balanced kingdom, heals us. The New Group of World Servers is preparing for the May 3 Wesak Buddha Taurus solar festival. We prepare through asking for and offering forgiveness. Forgiveness purifies and like nature, heals.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Mission Critical

How reading Lisa Jensen’s reviews taught me to love film
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Oral Fixations

Blown away by a Tuesday night dinner at Oswald

 

What would you like to see a TED talk about?

Hydrogen-gas cars that are coming this summer. Scott Oliver, Santa Cruz, Professor

 

Sarah’s Vineyard

Sarah’s Vineyard of Gilroy is known for crafting fine wines—and one of my all-time favorites is its Chardonnay. But this time, its Viognier has my vote.

 

Munch

East Coast meets West Coast in new meat lover’s paradise