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Jul 01st
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GT Columns

Editors Note

From the Editor

From the Editor

Plus Letters to the Editor


I began last week’s column with one word: Change. Maybe this week the word should be Transformation. It’s a fitting word, especially as the aftermath of last week’s upheavals in Eygpt continue to sink in. Transformation is good, but even better when one is aware of what kind of transformation is taking place—a quest for rights, freedom, democracy? Today in America, there are many who fight for those very same things. And while the culture’s obsesson with modern technology can sometimes distract or blur our focus on those who are making strides for greater civil rights, their efforts are nonetheless commendable and deserve notice, too. Civil rights activist Terrence Roberts spoke at UC Santa Cruz's 27th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Convocation earlier this week. A few weeks ago, Santa Cruz Next saluted a “quad squad” of locals forging ahead in innovative ways in their attempts to unite the community through their individual “progressive” projects.

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Local Talk

What would be the best economic boost for Santa Cruz County?

What would be the best economic boost for Santa Cruz County?
I think they should clean up Ocean Street and make it a little more tourist accessible.
Aynjul Benigno
Santa Cruz, Esthetician/Bartender

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Opinion

Cutting Redevelopment: A Bad Business Decision

Cutting Redevelopment: A Bad Business Decision

Editor’s Note: This guest column is compiled by Patrice Edwards, Chair, board of directors, and Bill Tysseling, executive director at the Santa Cruz Area Chamber of Commerce, for the Board of Directors.

As business people, we understand the challenge of controlling costs and staying on budget. We understand, too, the challenge facing California and Gov. Jerry Brown as he struggles to plug a $25 billion budget hole.

But we also understand the relationship between costs and benefits. That’s why the Santa Cruz Area Chamber of Commerce opposes the governor’s plan to eliminate redevelopment agencies in California.

As California emerges from what has been termed the Great Recession, the need for redevelopment agencies has never been greater. And that’s especially true for Santa Cruz County.

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Astrology

Year of the White Metal Rabbit

Year of the White Metal RabbitThe Chinese New Year Spring Festival will be celebrated for the next two weeks, till February 18th, the Full moon Chinese Lantern Festival (visit the Om Gallery, Downtown Santa Cruz, to prepare for your Lantern Festival party). Chinese astrology, based on the moon/lunar cycle, begins at the 2nd new moon after winter solstice (Feb, 2, Groundhog Day) and ends with the Lantern Festival two weeks later at the full moon (Feb. 18). 2011 is the year of the white metal rabbit. We are to look at the inner nature of rabbit and for the year, adopt those virtues—graciousness, sensitivity, gentleness, concentration, diplomacy, culture, manners, being reserved, scholarly, participating in study and intellectual activities.
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Editors Note

From the Editor

From the EditorPlus Letters to the Editor

Change. Sometimes it’s easy. And sometimes ... well, you know how that goes. But how do you tackle change on a much grander, perhaps less “personal,” scale? That’s what locals have to look forward to this week, should they be up for the cause. It all unfolds in an outing that I find compelling. It’s dubbed “Change: Mobilizing the Historical Narrative.” It’s part of the Santa Cruz Next What’s NEXT Lecture Series (whatsnextlectures.com), which, if you haven’t already had the chance to experience, consider doing so soon. You can’t beat this innovative program designed to inspire and promote new thought, locally, and, of course, stimulate change—all by bringing engaging speakers to town.
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Local Talk

What should Obama have his sights set on in 2011?

What should Obama have his sights set on in 2011?


Obama should try to clean up the mess that was made before he was in office, get us out of Iraq and Afghanistan and bring our boys back home.

Jake Conda

Santa Cruz | Waiter


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Opinion

What's In a Word?

What's In a Word?

So, there I was, loping through the San Francisco Chronicle last week. (We may surf the web, but a more laid-back and contemplative verb is required for perusing a newspaper in print) and there I found the article, "Book lovers turn the page on a new year," about Bay Area calligrapher Georgianna Greenwood. Early in January every year, she hosts a ceremony at the Center for the Book in San Francisco; eschewing the whole notion of New Year's resolutions, she invites participants to choose a single word to express their attitude toward the coming year—hopes, dreams,  strategies, goals, coping mechanisms, whatever—and then draws or collages together a "talisman" to celebrate that idea. But the core is that word, one single word to express one's personal Zeitgeist for the new year.

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Astrology

Chinese New Year, Groundhog Day, New Moon, Candlemas

Chinese New Year, Groundhog Day,  New Moon, CandlemasThe recent controversy (unnecessary flap) around astrology was short lived and distracting. I received, as did many astrologers, hundreds of emails asking what was the truth. Here’s the information. There are two different types of astrology for two different parts of the world and two different types of mind – 1) tropical (for the western mind) & 2) sidereal or Vedic (for the eastern mind, religion, training and sensibilities). The tropical zodiac is based upon the seasons (using equinox and solstice points. Vedic astrology (or the sidereal zodiac) is based upon the zodiacal constellations. Though 24 degrees apart, both are correct yet different. This seems a paradox, but it’s not.
The winter months, January, February and March, can seem rather empty without the winter festivals.
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Editors Note

From the Editor

From the Editor

Plus Letters to the Editor

I’m a sucker for people making a positive difference, which is why you’ll be reading about a few locals who really shine in this week’s cover story. Truth is, sometimes it’s rare to come across a group of dynamic people whose individual efforts create a positive ripple effect. But those spotlighted this week—Analicia Cube, Doron Comerchero, Deutron Kebebew and Cliff Hodges—are a real treat. Cube gave birth to Take Back Santa Cruz, a collective of locals who gathered on a Facebook group page that have united the community in response to, and against, “drugs, gangs and abusive behavior” throughout Santa Cruz.
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Local Talk

What are your thoughts on WikiLeaks and Julian Assange?

What are your thoughts on WikiLeaks and Julian Assange?

He's providing a very important service for the country, if not the world. Unfortunately we live in a system that really demands questions and one that often doesn't provide answers. This is a vehicle maybe for that kind of freedom of thought and expression that probably can't be obtained in any other way.

Andrew Duvin

San Francisco | Professor of Education

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The Boards Are Back in Town

More than a century after a famed trio of Hawaiian princes first surfed in Santa Cruz, their redwood olo surfboards are returning to the Museum of Art & History

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

With more people and fewer jobs in the future, what will you be doing?

Walking my dog, drinking coffee in the sun and talking to people. Probably working whatever job I can find. Katie Osborn, San Francisco, Waitress