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Jul 01st
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Opinion

Depth Perception

Depth Perception

“I don't want Johnny Depp in my lap." These are eight little words that no one who knows me would ever expect me to utter. I was as shocked as anybody when I heard them cross my own lips at a recent Memorial Day party. Art Boy naturally assumed the most logical explanation: my brain had been taken over by aliens.

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Astrology

Midsummer, Full Moon, Lunar Eclipse

Midsummer, Full Moon, Lunar EclipseThursday, June 24th is Midsummer Day (quarter day) and the Feast of St. John the Baptist, forerunner, cousin and baptizer of Jesus of Nazareth. This feast day, the oldest festival in the Christian church, occurs three months after the Annunciation and six months before Christmas (winter solstice). There is a famous statement St. John made upon seeing Jesus at the River Jordon, “He (Jesus) must increase, as I (John) must decrease.” (John 3:30). The statement reflects the Gemini brothers’ Castor & Pollux seed thought “I see my other self and in the waning of that self, I grow and glow” (referring to the dimming of the personality (John or in the light of the waxing of the Soul).
“The symbolic role for John in Christianity is to act as the sacrifical twin for Jesus: the dark twin of the summer solstice (John) being replaced by the light twin at the winter solstice (Jesus).” Two St. Johns are the patron saints of Freemasonry; St. John the Baptist at midsummer (June 24) and St. John the Evangilist on Dec. 27. The two saints represent Temple columns, one during the greatest time of light (summer) and the other at the greatest darkness (winter). Standing as they do at the solstices, they represent doorways to light and dark, just as the signs Cancer and Capricorn represent the Gates from spirit to matter and back again. On midsummer’s day the ancients honored water and fire, the sun and the plant kingdom. It is the time of the great wedding (Duke Theseus to Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons) as written by Shakespeare (lesser avatar, disciple, Master R.) in A Midsummer Night’s Dream (three plots, a wedding, the woodland and Fairyland featuring the King and Queen of the Fairies, Oberon and Tatiana, under the light of the moon).
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Editors Note

From the Editor

From the Editor

Plus Letters to Good Times...
Spend Taxes and Water Rate Increases on Jobs
Good to the Last Drop
Care to host a fundraiser? It wouldn’t hurt. Just choose the topic you’re fundraising for wisely. And, unless you’ve been in a coma the last 52 days, you already know where aid and relief efforts need to go—The Gulf of Mexico. The oil spill in the Gulf is the nation’s worst environmental disaster. As you are now aware, wildlife has been affected and the city of New Orleans, once again, is being impacted on a number of levels, mostly economically. And there’s the Gulf itself, which is being compromised as millions of gallons of oil continues to pump into it daily.

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Local Talk

How are you preparing for 2012?

How are you preparing for 2012?

Freaking out, digging the bomb shelter, buying all kinds of canned food—just stocking up.
Kyle Davis
Santa Cruz | Server

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Opinion

A Breath of Fresh Air

A Breath of Fresh Air

Several years ago, I was having lunch with U.S. Rep. Sam Farr, who mentioned between bites that he would soon meet with a class of students from Mount Madonna School during one of their periodic visits to Capitol Hill.

Farr must have seen me stifle a yawn, because he seemed to read my mind: “No. You don’t get it. What they do at Mount Madonna School is something different. It’s something that is known around the Capitol as the best program in the nation.”

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Astrology

Father, Summer & the Oil Spill – One Hot Summer

Father, Summer & the Oil Spill – One Hot SummerFather’s Day is Sunday. Libra moon trine Mercury in Gemini creates opportunities for Right Relations (Libra), communicating with feeling (moon) and intelligence (Mercury in Gemini) to our fathers. The sun is high in the heavens now (Tropic of Cancer). Summer, the longest day of light, begins Monday morning (4:28 a.m. West Coast). Soon the sun will begin to move southward, the light gradually decreasing each day. Within the most brilliant light there is also darkness. Duality is presented to us by Gemini. Uriel is the archangel guarding Earth during summer. The fairy world (devic builders) begins to rest, their work creating the plant kingdom complete for the year. Jupiter’s the morning star, brilliant Venus at night.
Oil spill questions: Is the Gulf oil spill the final event that brings down our economy? Was it created intentionally? Is the floor of the sea fractured? Are there eighteen other sites spewing oil. Are two million-plus gallons a day flowing into the sea? Is there a media blackout? Are there 20-mile wide plumes of fire? Is the oil dispersant (Corexit) placed on the waters (the toxic fumes falling from clouds) creating illness? Are geographic areas around the Gulf on lock down? Is this a massive cover-up? Are photographers being threatened? Will nuclear weapons be needed to cap the spill as Russia once had to? What and where’s the truth? And who’s really responsible? Is this a “false flag” event that is now out-of-hand? What will the consequences be on the economy and food supply?  Will there be unrest, will the market fall, and will a massive migration occur? Our world and lives are changing rapidly. There’s an eclipse next seek, seen in parts of the Americas. Astrology provides guideposts for humanity. The heavens tell us we’re in for one hot summer of enormous disruption and unprecedented unrest. Is everyone prepared?
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Editors Note

From the Editor

From the EditorPlus Letters to Good Times...
Thanks, Friend
More Gore
Best of the Online Comments
It’s the hot issue at the moment—the proposed Desalination Plant in Santa Cruz. Here’s the lowdown: The city of Santa Cruz has plans to create a desalination plant, which would offset water deficits. Those deficits are created in drought-ridden summer months, but if the city continues to grow—hello UC Santa Cruz—some believe water supplies will be further taxed. The desalination plant will remove millions of gallons of seawater each day but, some note, only about half that amount will be converted into drinkable water. The rest of the brine will be transported to a water plant and then blended with treated wastewater, and then put back in the bay. The issue has both sides debating the significance of the plant. This week, writer Amy Coombs presented the issue—and a number of questions—to community activists and water district representatives. You may find what they each share rather illuminating. It all unfolds in this week’s cover story. Dive in. Continue to send us your thoughts on the Desalination Plant issue to [email protected] Let’s keep the dialogue flowing.
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Local Talk

What are the pros and cons of a desalinization plant in Santa Cruz County?

What are the pros and cons of a desalinization plant in  Santa Cruz County?

I think the pros are more jobs in Santa Cruz, people working on the plant, etc. The cons would be if the plant itself creates a lot of pollution or makes a lot of noise in a residential neighborhood, or if it requires an increase in taxes.

Evin Murphy
Bonny Doon | Land Surveyor

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Opinion

Bookstores, e-readers and the Future of the Written Word

Bookstores, e-readers and the Future of the Written Word

A few months ago, I wrote a column about the written word, and wondered whether sentiments like “That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet” have forever transformed into texts like “U R gr8.”

The basic “harrumph!” quality of that column drastically missed the mark, somehow suggesting that the beauty of the written word was being replaced by something short and horrid, that the future of writing depended on the literary value of a teen’s text or a mini-blogger’s 140 words.

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Astrology

Flag Day & Gemini New Moon

Flag Day & Gemini New MoonLast Thursday, Mars (the tester) entered Virgo (extreme detail, purification) and this Thursday, Mercury (star of conflict) enters Gemini (duality). In order for all thoughts, actions, meeting and planning events to succeed this week and for the next month, it’s best to work within the following guidelines—purposely have focus and awareness, gather and organize information, be detailed and discerning, communicate with intentions for goodness and goodwill, allow no criticisms, and thus separations, to occur. Be aware of conflicts and crisis. Be prepared for tests, trials, and obstacles and remember always that “tension creates attention.” The Tester (Mars) and Star of Conflict (Mercury) will be influencing all of humanity’s endeavors.
Saturday (4:15 a.m., West Coast) is the new moon, 21 degrees Gemini. The personality-building seed thought for Gemini new Moon is “Let instability do its work.” This means let ordinary day to day experiences, disharmony, inconsistency, unpredictable changes, instability in relationships, lack of unity—all life’s vicissitudes—have the task of providing our personality and Soul experiences of/in form and matter. After many experiences and at a certain point (often in despair), we then seek out and focus upon creating harmony, a Soul quality. Thus all personality experiences of and in form and matter lead us to the goal: the Soul directing the strong and focused personality.
Join the NGWS at the new moon by reciting the Great Invocation. Monday is Flag Day. Flags, an unrecognized art form, represent the spirit of the people within each nation, country and state. Monday, Venus enters Leo. Everyone falls in love. Or wants to. Love is the only thing that heals the Chiron wound. Chiron is retrograde. Old wounds return.
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I Was a Teenage Deadhead

Memories of life on tour, plus the truth about that legendary Santa Cruz Acid Test

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Open Wide

Soif’s soft reboot leads to expanded menu, plus the ‘thinking woman’s ketchup’