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Apr 17th
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From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times...
Cheap Seats?
Settle Down, Please
2012: Business as Usual
Holiday Deadlines
How much do we really know about Santa Cruz County? Chances are, we probably could know more. That’s where The Community Assessment Project (CAP) comes in. CAP is a bold study published every five years. It’s filled with collected research on a number of local topics—from health to homelessness and more. The entire project is designed to gain a better understanding of what’s really unfolding here in Santa Cruz County. The end result illuminates revealing statistics which then can be later used to better access needs and services for the community, and also to create a vision for life here in 2015. But there’s much more to it than that, which you will discover in this week’s cover story, written by News Editor Elizabeth Limbach.  Take note, too, of our survey online. We’d like to hear from you about what issues you feel are important in the county. Head to goodtimessantacruz.com to log in your thoughts.

In the meantime, some good news for our own Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music. The internationally revered fest was honored with a 2009-2010 ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming at the League of American Orchestras’ 65th Annual Conference in Atlanta, Georgia. The League and ASCAP present the awards annually to orchestras of all sizes for programs that “challenge the audience, build the repertoire, and increase interest in music of our time.”  Well, Cabrillo certainly does that. Congratulations to Maestra Marin Alsop et al. Take note: The fest celebrates its 48th season in Santa Cruz Aug.1 (cabrillomusic.org).

Stay tuned. More soon ...

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to Good Times Editor

2012: Business as Usual
Regarding some theories about 2012 mentioned in last week’s cover story, so, on 12/21/12, at 11:11, the sun will “align” with a black hole at the center of the Milky Way, resulting in the Apocalypse. Um, yeah. Let's see, where to begin? First, all numerical designations for time, such as hours, minutes, days, months, and years, are purely arbitrary inventions of human beings. They have no significance in the natural universe. And the Mayan calendar would not have indicated this point in time with these numbers, anyway, much less the Chinese calendar, the Jewish calendar, etc.
Then, there's the galaxy thing. So some black hole in the center of the galaxy is going to “align”(What does that mean, anyway?  There is always an “alignment” between any two points in space) with our teeny little sun way out here on the edge of the spiral, and this will wreak havoc. That must be one honking black hole. In fact, it would be so big, it would swallow all the rest of the galaxy before it got to us. So, why didn't “alignment” with any of the gazillion larger, closer suns in the galaxy set off this destruction? And how is a bomb shelter stocked with supplies going to allow anyone to survive this?
You know what I think is way more likely? Scientific ignorance and gullibility  will reach critical mass on Dec. 12, 2012, and the human race will self destruct. The universe won't notice.
Shari Prange
Bonny Doon


Settle Down, Please
The cover story, “2012,” focused upon dire speculation and dark possibilities of the 2012 Winter solstice event. There were many (breathless) "voices" in the article stating many unreal realities charging the emotional field that obliterate intelligence. Winter Solstice, 2012 is, in fact, an important astrological esoteric event. However, the astrology of the event wasn't researched or included in the article. And the picture of Lady Liberty being swept away underscored the many voices predicting devastation. The article's heavily one-sided slant was disturbing.
Risa
Santa Cruz

Cheap Seats?
It was gratifying to hear from a rational adult concerning the cheapening of the Panetta Lecture Series by inviting Al Gore. Lost 17's letter, Best Of The Online Comments on June 10, proves that not all who hear Gore buy in to this global warming farce like so many sheep.
Although the writer claims a lack of scientific evidence to argue the case, he certainly sees right through this charlatan's game. Just follow the money. And that goes for those junk scientists at East Anglia who violated the first principle of scientific discovery, Truth.
If one would "empower" oneself and "learn about it" as the High Priest of Junk Science suggested, one might start by reading “The Great Global Warming Blunder” by Roy W. Spencer.
Paul D. Browne
Capitola

Holiday Deadlines
Good Times offices will be closed Monday, July 5 in observance of Independence Day. Offices reopen at 9 a.m. Tuesday, July 6. The following deadlines will be in effect for the Thursday, July 8 issue. Display and Classified Display advertising deadlines are 3 pm, Thursday July 1. Classified advertising deadline is 11 am, Monday, July 5. Editorial Calendar and Music Events deadlines are noon, Tuesday, June 29.҅

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Growing Hope

Campos Seguros combats sexual assault in the Watsonville farmworker community Farm work was a way of life for Rocio Camargo, who grew up in Watsonville as the daughter of Mexican immigrants. Her parents met while working the fields 30 years ago, and her father went on to run Fuentes Berry Farms.

 

Cardinal Grand Cross in the Sky

Following Holy Week (passion, death and burial of the Pisces World Teacher) and Easter Sunday (Resurrection Festival), from April 19 to the 23, the long-awaited and discussed Cardinal Cross of Change appears in the sky, composed of Cardinal signs Aries, Libra, Cancer, and Capricorn, with planets (13-14 degrees) Uranus (in Aries), Jupiter (in Cancer), Mars (in Libra) and Pluto (in Capricorn), an actual geometrical square or cross configuration. Cardinal signs mark the seasons of change, initiating new realities.

 

Sugar: The New Tobacco?

Proposed bill would require warning labels on sugary drinks Will soda and other saccharine libations soon come with a health warning? They will if it’s up to our state senator, Bill Monning (D-Carmel). On Feb. 27, Monning proposed first-of-its-kind legislation that would require a consumer warning label be placed on sugar-sweetened beverages sold in California. SB 1000, also known as the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Safety Warning Act, was proposed to provide vital information to consumers about the harmful effects of consuming sugary drinks, such as sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, and sweetened teas.

 

Animal Magnetism

Bear, mouse dare to be friends in charming ‘Ernest and Celestine’ It’s not exactly Romeo and Juliet. It’s not even a romance, although it is a love story about two individuals separated by prejudice who find the courage to form an unshakable bond despite the rules and traditions that keep them apart.
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Foodie File: Red Apple Cafe

Breakfast takes center stage at Gracia Krakauer's Red Apple Cafe Before they moved to Aptos, Gracia and her husband Dan Krakauer would visit friends in Santa Cruz County and eat at the Red Apple Café all the time. Then they moved up here from Santa Monica five years ago, and bought the Aptos location (there’s a separate one in Watsonville) from the family who owned it for two decades.

 

How would you feel about a tech industry boom in Santa Cruz?

I feel like it would ruin the small old-town feeling of Santa Cruz. It wouldn’t be the same Surf City kind of vacation town that it is. Antoinette BennettSanta Cruz | Construction Management

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Trout Gulch Vineyards

Cinsault 2012—la grande plage diurne The most popular wines on store shelves are those most generally known and available—Chardonnay, Sauvignon Blanc, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, which are all superb for sure. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Trout Gulch Vineyards’ Cinsault ($18), it opens up a whole new world.