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Aug 27th
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From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times
Middle-East Meltdown?
Talk More
The District’s Disconnect
Club much? Sometimes, it’s a good thing, and if you’ve moseyed to any of the local nightclubs in Santa Cruz County over the years, you more than likely have been greeted by a powerful presence—a bouncer. This week, writer J.D. Ramey takes readers behind the scenes and uncovers, well, let’s say the more embraceable side of some of our area’s favorite greeters and, at times, protectors. These guys are an enigmatic bunch.

Meanwhile, Cabrillo Stage delivers a powerful show with “Cabaret.” The summer production titillates but also provokes thought. It’s one of the best productions of the year. Read a review of the show. Then, there’s Shakespeare Santa Cruz, which also strikes a memorable chord with “The Lion in Winter.” Learn how it measures up in Lisa Jensen’s review. Not to be left out of a packed summer season, is the reputable and downright innovative Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music. J.D. Ramey previews the fest, which launches this week, (See you there.)

In between all the fun and festivals, there’s also you and yours to pay attention to as well. And ... how is that going. During your summer travels, consider two books that captured my attention recently—couldn’t put them down. One is “Shift,” by Peter Arnell, which tackles branding, well, you. It’s a captivating read that steers you closer to understanding your inner workings and what, exactly, you’re putting out there into the world. (Never hurts to know that.) The other book is Geneen Roth’s “Woman, Food and God.” Don’t freak out, fellas—while the word “woman” is in the title, the book is actually universal in the way it talks about the motivations that lie beneath the surface of much of what we do. I also found it interesting how the author states she can tell more about a person’s relationship to themselves, with life—with “God”—through their relationship with food and the food they put on their plates. Deep. But think about that one as you move through the rest of your summer.

More next time ...
Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to Good Times Editor

Middle-East Meltdown?
The army forces Israel to compromise her security while in today's world, media  and society witness multitudes of rapid changes. Thus, to meet in my Good Times, the unchanging Gil Stein perspective of Israel can do no wrong: End of Subject is both laughable and lamentable.
Israel's future security and ours too (according to our own generals) demands a just resolution 'twixt Israelis and Palestinians. Therefore, all attempts at furthering education and clarification such  as the planned Rev. Grishaw-Jones and Rabbi Marcus trip should not be derided, but rather welcomed and encouraged.
Joyce McLean
Los Gatos

Talk More
In your Local Talk section (GT 7/15), ‘man on the street’ Luke Harris laments that we have not made the American idea of freedom “real.” I agree that we as a nation have yet to achieve genuine freedom. In short, I am compelled to pay taxes for a system of beliefs that undermines my own convictions. For example, as a public school teacher, I see more and more students “embarrassed” about their belief in God.  Why are they embarrassed?  You see, “science” has disproved the Bible. We now “know” that, contrary to “silly superstition,” the universe was created by a gigantic explosion in space (i.e. the big bang theory). 
Lofty professors in their tax-supported positions of power preach and hail the spectacular creative force of expanding matter. Yet, explode a mountain, explode a planet, or explode all the matter in the universe and you will never create great kids like mine, nor a beautiful sunset, nor lilies in a valley.  They were made by God. To use the name of science to rob God of the credit He deserves for creating the universe is the lowest of the low. I protest. 
Ken Schleimer
Scotts Valley

The District’s Disconnect
Regarding Tom Honig’s column, as a recently relocated Washingtonian here in Santa Cruz, I was compelled by your take on the District's disconnect. Some say that Washington is a lot like Hollywood, but without the beautiful people. I'm not one to make spurious blanket statements, but while living there, I met innumerable lobbyists, journalists and staffers who were perpetually star-struck and waiting for their big breaks. Most of them shared a serious—and perhaps unhealthy—thirst for power, too. I struggled to identify with such a senseless slog, and felt that it was definitely unique to a place like Washington, D.C.
That being said, the District—much like Santa Cruz—has charms in spades. I’ll surely miss the infinite festivals, the constant stream of theatrical, artistic, and musical talent, and, most of all, the museums and monuments.
I’m delighted you touched on this vital aspect of Washington, D.C. There’s nothing better inside the Beltway than the sense of civic pride that arises from Lincoln to the Capitol. District denizens would constantly bemoan tourists infiltrating “their” city and getting in the way during evening jogs and bike rides on the National Mall.
I never got it.
Washington is first and foremost the nation’s capital. Every American must stand in the shadow of the Washington Monument, soak up the sundry exhibits of the Smithsonian, bear witness to the silence at Arlington Cemetery. Washington, D.C. is America.
Sean Rameswaram
Santa Cruz
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The Meaning of ‘LIFE’

With a new documentary film about his work, and huge exhibits on both coasts, acclaimed Santa Cruz nature photographer Frans Lanting is having a landmark year. But his crusade for conservation doesn’t leave much time for looking back

 

Seasons of Opportunity

Everything in our world has a specific time (a season) in which to accomplish a specific work—a “season” that begins (opportunity) and ends (time’s up). I can feel the season is changing. The leaves turning colors, the air cooler, sunbeams casting shadows in different places. It feels like a seasonal change has begun in the northern hemisphere. Christmas is in four months, and 2015 is swiftly speeding by. Soon it will be autumn and time for the many Festivals of Light. Each season offers new opportunities. Then the season ends and new seasons take its place. Humanity, too, is given “seasons” of opportunity. We are in one of those opportunities now, to bring something new (Uranus) into our world, especially in the United States. Times of opportunity can be seen in the astrology chart. In the U.S. chart, Uranus (change) joins Chiron (wound/healing). This symbolizes a need to heal the wounds of humanity. Uranus offers new archetypes, new ways of doing things. The Uranus/Chiron (Aries/Pisces) message is, “The people of the U.S. are suffering. New actions are needed to bring healing and well-being to humanity. So the U.S. can fulfill its spiritual task of standing within the light and leading humanity within and toward the light.” Thursday, Aquarius Moon, Mercury enters Libra. The message, “To bring forth the new order in the world, begin with acts of Goodwill.” Goodwill produces right relations with everyone and everything. The result is a world of progressive well-being and peacefulness (which is neither passive nor the opposite of war). Saturday is the full moon, the solar light of Virgo streaming into the Earth. Our waiting now begins, for the birth of new light at winter solstice. The mother (hiding the light of the soul, the holy child), identifying the feminine principle, says, “I am the mother and the child. I, God (Father), I Matter (Mother), We are One.”

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

His Dinner With David

Author + reporter = brainy talk in ‘End of the Tour’
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Land of Plenty

Farm to Fork benefit dinner for UCSC’s Agroecology Center, plus a zippy salsa from Teresa’s Salsa that loves every food it meets

 

If you knew you had one week to live, what would you do?

Make peace with myself, which would allow me to be at peace with others. Diane Fisher, Santa Cruz, Network Engineer

 

Comanche Cellars

Michael Simons, owner and winemaker of Comanche Cellars, once had a trusted steed called Comanche, which was part of his paper route and his rodeo circuit, from the tender age of 10. In memory of this beautiful horse, he named his winery Comanche, and Comanche’s shoes grace the label of each handcrafted bottle.

 

Cantine Winepub

Aptos wine and tapas spot keeps it casual