Santa Cruz Good Times

Saturday
Sep 20th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times
Middle-East Meltdown?
Talk More
The District’s Disconnect
Club much? Sometimes, it’s a good thing, and if you’ve moseyed to any of the local nightclubs in Santa Cruz County over the years, you more than likely have been greeted by a powerful presence—a bouncer. This week, writer J.D. Ramey takes readers behind the scenes and uncovers, well, let’s say the more embraceable side of some of our area’s favorite greeters and, at times, protectors. These guys are an enigmatic bunch.

Meanwhile, Cabrillo Stage delivers a powerful show with “Cabaret.” The summer production titillates but also provokes thought. It’s one of the best productions of the year. Read a review of the show. Then, there’s Shakespeare Santa Cruz, which also strikes a memorable chord with “The Lion in Winter.” Learn how it measures up in Lisa Jensen’s review. Not to be left out of a packed summer season, is the reputable and downright innovative Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music. J.D. Ramey previews the fest, which launches this week, (See you there.)

In between all the fun and festivals, there’s also you and yours to pay attention to as well. And ... how is that going. During your summer travels, consider two books that captured my attention recently—couldn’t put them down. One is “Shift,” by Peter Arnell, which tackles branding, well, you. It’s a captivating read that steers you closer to understanding your inner workings and what, exactly, you’re putting out there into the world. (Never hurts to know that.) The other book is Geneen Roth’s “Woman, Food and God.” Don’t freak out, fellas—while the word “woman” is in the title, the book is actually universal in the way it talks about the motivations that lie beneath the surface of much of what we do. I also found it interesting how the author states she can tell more about a person’s relationship to themselves, with life—with “God”—through their relationship with food and the food they put on their plates. Deep. But think about that one as you move through the rest of your summer.

More next time ...
Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to Good Times Editor

Middle-East Meltdown?
The army forces Israel to compromise her security while in today's world, media  and society witness multitudes of rapid changes. Thus, to meet in my Good Times, the unchanging Gil Stein perspective of Israel can do no wrong: End of Subject is both laughable and lamentable.
Israel's future security and ours too (according to our own generals) demands a just resolution 'twixt Israelis and Palestinians. Therefore, all attempts at furthering education and clarification such  as the planned Rev. Grishaw-Jones and Rabbi Marcus trip should not be derided, but rather welcomed and encouraged.
Joyce McLean
Los Gatos

Talk More
In your Local Talk section (GT 7/15), ‘man on the street’ Luke Harris laments that we have not made the American idea of freedom “real.” I agree that we as a nation have yet to achieve genuine freedom. In short, I am compelled to pay taxes for a system of beliefs that undermines my own convictions. For example, as a public school teacher, I see more and more students “embarrassed” about their belief in God.  Why are they embarrassed?  You see, “science” has disproved the Bible. We now “know” that, contrary to “silly superstition,” the universe was created by a gigantic explosion in space (i.e. the big bang theory). 
Lofty professors in their tax-supported positions of power preach and hail the spectacular creative force of expanding matter. Yet, explode a mountain, explode a planet, or explode all the matter in the universe and you will never create great kids like mine, nor a beautiful sunset, nor lilies in a valley.  They were made by God. To use the name of science to rob God of the credit He deserves for creating the universe is the lowest of the low. I protest. 
Ken Schleimer
Scotts Valley

The District’s Disconnect
Regarding Tom Honig’s column, as a recently relocated Washingtonian here in Santa Cruz, I was compelled by your take on the District's disconnect. Some say that Washington is a lot like Hollywood, but without the beautiful people. I'm not one to make spurious blanket statements, but while living there, I met innumerable lobbyists, journalists and staffers who were perpetually star-struck and waiting for their big breaks. Most of them shared a serious—and perhaps unhealthy—thirst for power, too. I struggled to identify with such a senseless slog, and felt that it was definitely unique to a place like Washington, D.C.
That being said, the District—much like Santa Cruz—has charms in spades. I’ll surely miss the infinite festivals, the constant stream of theatrical, artistic, and musical talent, and, most of all, the museums and monuments.
I’m delighted you touched on this vital aspect of Washington, D.C. There’s nothing better inside the Beltway than the sense of civic pride that arises from Lincoln to the Capitol. District denizens would constantly bemoan tourists infiltrating “their” city and getting in the way during evening jogs and bike rides on the National Mall.
I never got it.
Washington is first and foremost the nation’s capital. Every American must stand in the shadow of the Washington Monument, soak up the sundry exhibits of the Smithsonian, bear witness to the silence at Arlington Cemetery. Washington, D.C. is America.
Sean Rameswaram
Santa Cruz
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

Catwalk on the Wild Side

Meet the artists and designers behind this year’s edition of FashionART, SantaCruz’s most outrageous fashion show

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Watch List

From Google to the government to data brokers, why your privacy is now a thing of the past

 

The Peace Equation

Sunday is the United Nations’ International Day of Peace, a global peace-building day when nations, leaders, governments, communities and individuals are invited to end conflict, cease hostilities, creat 24 hours of non-violence and promote goodwill. Monday is Autumn equinox as the Sun enters Libra (right relations with all of life). The Soul Year now begins. We work in the dark part of the year (Persephone underground) preparing for the new light of winter solstice. Tuesday to Wednesday is the Virgo new moon festival. We know two things about peace. “The absence of war does not signify peace.” And “Peace is an ongoing process.” In its peace-building emphasis, the UNIDP, through education, attempts to create a “culture of peace, understanding and tolerance”. Esoterically we are reminded of the peace equation: “Intentions for goodwill (and acting upon this intention) create right relations with all earth’s kingdoms which create (the ongoing process of) peace on earth.” At noon on Sunday, in all time zones, millions of participating groups will observe a moment of silence for peace on earth. Bells will ring, candles will be lit, and doves released as the New Group of World Servers recite the Great Invocation (humanity’s mantram of direction). To connect with others around the world see www.cultureofpeace.org    Let us join together with the mother (Virgo). Goodwill to all, let peace prevail on earth. The dove is the symbol for the day.
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Sweet Treats

Local cannabis bakers win award for cookies

 

What fashion trends do you want to see, or not see?

Santa Cruz  |  High School Guidance Counselor

 

Best of Santa Cruz County

The 2013 Santa Cruz County Readers' Poll and Critics’ Picks It’s our biggest issue of the year, and in it, your votes—more than 6,500 of them—determined the winners of The Best of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll. New to the long list of local restaurants, shops and other notables that captured your interest: Best Beer Selection, Best Locally Owned Business, Best Customer Service and Best Marijuana Dispensary. In the meantime, many readers were ever so chatty online about potential new categories. Some of the suggestions that stood out: Best Teen Program and Best Web Design/Designer. But what about: Dog Park, Church, Hotel, Local Farm, Therapist (I second that!) or Sports Bar—not to be confused with Bra. Our favorite suggestion: Best Act of Kindness—one reader noted Café Gratitude and the free meals it offered to the Santa Cruz Police Department in the aftermath of recent crimes. Perhaps some of these can be woven into next year’s ballot, so stay tuned. In the meantime, enjoy the following pages and take note of our Critics’ Picks, too, beginning on page 91. A big thanks for voting—and for reading—and an even bigger congratulations to all of the winners. Enjoy.  -Greg Archer, EditorBest of Santa Cruz County Readers’ Poll INDEX

 

Santa Clara Wine Trail

My memories of growing up in England include my mother pouring port after Sunday dinner—and sometimes a glass of sherry before dinner. My family didn’t drink much wine back then, but we certainly made up for it with the port and sherry.