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Jul 28th
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From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to Good Times
All Wet?
The Climate Plan
It’s Week two for Open Studios so get out there and savor some of that great eye candy. This week, we do just that in our cover story, where several writers explore significant new works and one exhibit that is sure to standout—the “Visibly Invisible” exhibit at Cabrillo Gallery. The show explores transgender themes, among other issues, and features photography, paintings and other inviting pieces. Curated by Cabrillo’s Tobin Keller, it’s a feast for the eyes if not thought-provoking. Learn more about the artists, as well as other noteworthy works featured in this weekend’s Open Studios. Congratulations to all.

In the meantime, take note of News this week, where one intrepid writer reports on a spiritual tent revival that may also turn heads. How that came to be may capture your interest. There’s some more news on the Green Ways To School program, too.

Election season is here, of course, and who better than columnist Sven Davis to offer a great spin on all of that. In this week’s column, Davis recounts an experience from a past election and wonders whether voting can ever really be easy. Thoughts?

Over in A&E, you’ll be interested to know more about UC Santa Cruz Grateful Dead archivist Nicholas Meriwether, who has a lot going on—literally. What goes on behind closed doors in the archive? You’d be amazed. But probed further, Meriwether comes across as a great steward of the collection. “In a hundred years I hope that this archive is able to give a future archeologist the stories of personal transformation that came out of the Dead scene,” he notes. Learn more on here.

What else? Well, it’s fall and the time is ripe for reflection. How has the year been treating you? And, more importantly, how have you treated it? Ponder it all and get back to me.

Thanks for reading. More soon ...

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to Good Times Editor
All Wet?
Tom Honig is once again unable to escape from his own illogical, narrow
thinking.  In last week’s column, he says, "The argument against [UCSC] growth is that there's not enough water to allow more students."  He then carries on without mentioning the word "water" again once. In other words, he fails to confront the water issue.  It's sounds nice to urge "good environmental policies in planning" when saying "some development is necessary." But how can our city grow and develop without increasing the water supply which would be needed for the additional population that such growth would
bring? 
The answer is we can't.  Thus, it seems clear that growth is the real motive for the city's proposed desalination plant.  If the city would expand intelligently upon last year's successful water conservation
measures, there would be enough water for the existing population with no need for an exorbitantly expensive, ocean-polluting, greenhouse gas-emitting desalination plant.  But without that new source of water, growth is no longer feasible in Santa Cruz.  We have long ago reached our limits.
Jeff Alford
Santa Cruz

The Climate Plan
Regarding your environment coverage, our Climate Plan is short natural science and this a university town. Our plan has mercury from “low energy” reject light bulbs finding its way to the Bay, low flush toilets that pollute groundwater, septic tanks, and plumbing, with a build up of human and other waste. And we burn potential topsoil (biofuel) to power trips to 7-Eleven and Costco while reducing bus service.
Monsanto couldn’t make it more cynically serious than our failure to mention “tree planting and taller brush” as nature’s own way of lovingly accommodating people (absorbing our exhaust) and other living things and providing tax incentives for property with healthy trees.
I don’t see oxygen emanating from city councilmembers, but under their watch we lost 37 trees, including some stately redwoods. Lately, they have been chopping down trees in a bizarre attempt to cure alcoholism, and chase junkies to seek shade elsewhere. Reducing CO2 exhaust is just part of the problem. Who’s on call to bring buses downtown for flood evacuation. Vegetarian education, or meatless Mondays and Fridays at elementary schools—an ultimate plug-in.
Simply adding groundcover, instead of pay to rake, will allow more trees to survive and absorb CO2 into living soil systems.  Finally, all welcome the new Oak Trees for Evergreen Cemetary, Oct 12 (10 a.m.). Way to go climate team.
Billy Quealy
Santa Cruz
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The Binding of Edmund McMillen

How a Santa Cruz designer created one of the most unlikely hits in video game history

 

Sun in Leo, Rosy Star, Venus and Uranus Retrograde

Three major celestial events occur this week. Wednesday, the Sun enters Leo, highlighting the heart center of everyone. Leo is a sign of deep sensitivity (along with Cancer). Wednesday is also the feast day of St. Mary Magdalene, one of the most misunderstood women in the Bible. Saturday, July 25, Venus turns stationary retrograde at 0 Virgo (progressed Regulus, the Law, Hall of Records). Venus retrogrades for 44 days and nights, forming one petal of a five-pointed rosy star (pentagram) in the sky (five retrogrades over eight years = star). Venus retrograde turns values upside down. Our usual sense of beauty, values, the real price of things, relationships—all turn into a bundle of confusion. We don’t seem to know anything. Luxury goods are mispriced, values are jumbled, we wonder who that person is we’re in relationship with. We don’t know where our money is or where it’s gone. Venus, in daily life, represents values (resources, money, possessions and quality of relationships). Venus retrograde asks, “What do I value?” Venus retrograde puts us in touch with what has changed and what is truly of value in our lives. Venus retrogrades from 0 Virgo to 14 degrees Leo (July 25-Sept. 6). Leo is about the self and our creativity, which is how we come to know and value ourselves. We “know ourselves through what we create.” In Venus (values) retrograde (inner focus) we will ask, “What are values (not just money and finances)? What are my values? What do I create? How do I value my creations? Do I value myself?” Sunday, Uranus—planet of all things new, revelatory and revolutionary—also retrogrades (from 20 to 16 degrees Aries) until the full moon of Christmas Day. Five months of Uranus retrograde. In July and continuing on through the following months we have many planets retrograding. Things therefore slow down. Everyone’s focus becomes subjective, hidden by veils and curtains. A time when inner reserves of strength are available. A time of protection.

 

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Film, Times & Events: Week of July 24

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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