Santa Cruz Good Times

Monday
Jun 29th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

From the Editor

greg_archerS2sPlus Letters to the Editor

Fiona Apple once said: “There aren't many poster children for cool angst.” I just say: “Thanks for the angst.” (Trust me—it’s easier to embrace it sometimes than fight it.) So ... it’s that time of year. again. Welcome! Welcome to your opportunity to get the heck out of your own way and everybody else’s for that matter. I’m not sure about you, but this year rushed by at a feverish pace. Death. Deadlines. More deadlines, and, in between, too many stories—quite a few that were uplifting—that filtered into the mix. But we’re far from being done with 2010. Which is why this week’s cover story seems truly appropriate. It revolves around AIDS. This week, our GT writer asks: Has AIDS become the forgotten epidemic?  Thirty years after AIDS stormed onto the scene, and after major medical advances to treat HIV, has this disease slipped out of public awareness? In a compelling read, with insights from locals involved with Santa Cruz AIDS Project, as well as longtime Assemblyman John Laird, and others, learn more about where we, as a society, are at with the illness. The story begins on page 16. Take note of News this week,too. Our reporter looks into why Cambodia means so much to one UC Santa Cruz cop. There’s also news of a Cruzan on a mission to walk—big time—for a major cause. And Assemblyman Bill Monning chimes in on the new wave of Republicans in Washington. Have a thought on that? Send it to us at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .
What else? There’s a holiday window- decorating contest taking place in Downtown Santa Cruz and GT readers can vote for their favorite. Learn more at goodtimessantacruz or downtownsantacruz.com. Take note of the Holiday Parade Dec. 4 in Downtown, too. See page 64 for more detail. And Snow Night: It’s Thursday, Dec. 9.
What else? In last week’s Astrology column, the incorrect introduction ran. (All the signs were correct.) We regret the error.  Now ... go have a terrific week.
Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to the Editor


Thanks For The Votes

With Thanksgiving season, I am reminded that I have much to be thankful for following the well-orchestrated Nov. 2 Statewide General Election in Santa Cruz County.

I am very grateful to our more than 900 poll workers who staffed the polling centers to ensure that voters had an opportunity to make their voices heard in this important mid-term election. I would also like to thank our extended county family of staff from other departments who helped us meet our staffing needs and helped us make election day happen. Certainly, we could not possibly educate all of our voters without the coverage from our local news reporters and photographers who all deserve a round of applause for all they do. And, it would not be an election without voters, and I’m happy to see that our turnout in Santa Cruz County will be more than 95,000 once all votes are counted.

Election day planning begins months before the big day, and the auditing and verification processes can take weeks following the election. The people who do all the tedious work of election planning and auditing, include our outstanding team of full-time and extra help staff. They have sacrificed time away from their families and friends, lost sleep, and some have gained pounds as a result of their commitment to elections processes and procedures. In fact, conducting six elections in seven months was no easy task, but they all performed above and beyond. Thanks to our full-time staff, including Tricia Webber, Jaime Young, Martin Peaden, Inger Christenson, Crystal Bertheau, Margaret Morrison, Kimberly Petersen, Kathy Wolf, Anita Fimbrez, and Mark Leonardich who continue to inspire me by their passion and professionalism. Indeed, they could not do their jobs without our dedicated extra help staff. There are too many to name them all, but I would be remiss to not name some: Judy, Evelyn, Thelma, John, Jaime, Elia, Renee, Dee, Jennifer, Jana, Maria, Stanley, Roxanne, Cassie, Kat, Naomi, Christopher, Tony, Karen, Richard, Don, Garret, Robert, Ben, and MaryLou. The full-time and extra help staff members are all truly amazing

people who deserve our thanks for all they have done and continue to do to make sure Santa Cruz County elections are secure, accurate, and transparent. Thank you all for a job well done.

Gail Pellerin
County Clerk, Santa Cruz


Forget Facebook

Regarding Lisa Jensen’s column on Facebook (GT 11/24), I, too, am one of the last people who will not sign up for Facebook. However, I dressed up as Facebook for Halloween and it was a big hit downtown.

Judi G.

Santa Cruz


Fan of the Fund

A big thank you to you, Good Times, for another Community Fund issue. This year’s group of nonprofits Barrios Unidos, Family Service Agency of the Central Coast, Hospice of Santa Cruz, and Planned Parenthood perfectly plucked out some of the great many out there. Thanks for showing us where to contribute. Peace.

Joan Harding

Capitola

Fan of the Mural

Thanks for the wonderful piece on Bob Von Elgg’s “Raining Acorns” mural that now graces the side of the new Safeway on Mission Street. While we appreciate the coverage, the article didn’t mention Safeway’s role as a co-sponsor of the mural. This mural project would not have been possible without the company’s generosity and support. The Matching Grant Mural Program is a public-private venture dedicated to enhancing the streetscape and incorporating our community's culture and history into the built environment.

Crystal Birns

Arts Program Manager, City of Santa Cruz

Economic Development and Redevelopment



Best of The Online Comments


On Kyle Thiermann and ‘Buy Local, Surf Global’ ...

Kyle Thiermann is the future of our generation in social and global activism. It is heartening to know that not all of our peers are apathetic to the state of the world we live in. He is living the change he wants to see in the world and is showing us the means by which to effectively keep revenue in our communities and remain globally minded. Keep it up dude!

Chris Proffitt


So cool to see folks who are focused on sports and fitness also doing good for the planet. I really appreciate the reminder that this is the way to keep our communities strong! Go Kyle.

Celia Alario


You’re like Captain Planet with a surfboard!!

Tanders CockTan


On Kim Luke’s ‘Thanksgiving For the Ungrateful’  ...

Well written and well met .... To be thankful for that which the unenlightened think of as bothersom, annoying and a pain. Those same things that show just how lucky we are!!!

Showtime

Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

I Was a Teenage Deadhead

Memories of life on tour, plus the truth about that legendary Santa Cruz Acid Test

 

I Build a Lighted House and Therein Dwell

Wednesday, June 24, Chiron turns stationary retrograde (we turn inward) at 21.33 degrees Pisces. We usually speak of “retrograde” when referring to Mercury. But all planets retrograde. Next month in July, Venus retrogrades. What is Chiron retrograde? Chiron represents the wound within all of us. Wounds have purpose. They sensitize us; make us aware of pain and suffering. Through our wounds we develop compassion. Through compassion we become whole (holy) again. Chiron helps develop these states of consciousness. Everyone carries a wound. Everyone carries family wounds (family astrology tracks the astrological “DNA” through generations). Chiron wounds are deep within. We’re often not aware of them until Chiron retrogrades. Then the wounds (through pain, hurt, sadness, suffering) become apparent. They seem to break us open emotionally, psychologically. Painful events from the past are remembered. They are brought to the present for healing. Through experiencing, talking about and deeply feeling what is hurting us, healing takes place. We begin to understand and bring healing to others. All week, Jupiter and Venus move closer together in the sky. They meet in Leo at the full moon, Cancer solar festival, on Wednesday, July 1. The Cancer keynote is, “I build a lighted house and therein dwell.” The soul’s light has finally penetrated the “womb” of matter. The New Group of World Servers is to radiate this light. At the end of each sign are keywords to use and remember during the Chiron retrograde.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Film, Times & Events: Week of June 26

Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Kickin' Chicken

Local kitchen alchemist Justin Williams is fast becoming a cult flavor master. His late-night wizardry, which began last fall delivering mainly to starving UCSC students, is catching on with taste buds beyond campus. Kickin’ Chicken delivers its spicy-sweet fried chicken and waffles to Westside residents between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. nightly. Or you can catch him and his brother and sister, Candice and Danny Mendoza, serving it up at their “Sunday Mass” at the Santa Cruz Food Lounge at 1001 Center St. in Santa Cruz. Using sous vide, a French method of cooking chicken in a water bath at a tightly controlled temperature, they then flash fry it for an amazingly crispy coat. Candice Mendoza spoke to GT about Kickin’ Chicken’s rise.

 

What’s a creative new approach to addressing summer beach litter?

Robotic dogs, with duct tape on their paws, that walk around picking up litter wherever they go. Joaquin Heinz, Santa Cruz, Barista

 

Pelican Ranch Winery

The most popular red wines found on store shelves are also those most commonly known, such as Pinot, Zinfandel and Merlot. But when you come across a more unusual varietal, like Pelican Ranch Winery’s Cinsault ($19), it opens up a whole new world. Cinsault is a grape that can tolerate heat, so it is found in countries with warmer climes such as Morocco, Algeria, Lebanon, and France. It’s rare in California but grows well in places like Lodi—Silvaspoons Vineyard in this particular case—where it’s hot and dry. Often used as a blending grape, the silky Cinsault is just fine on its own.

 

Open Wide

Soif’s soft reboot leads to expanded menu, plus the ‘thinking woman’s ketchup’