Santa Cruz Good Times

Dec 01st
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From the Editor

greg_archerPlus Letters to the Editor

There’s plenty of buzz on La Bahia (see letters) but this week, the spotlight is on a bunch of culinary wizards that continue to make the Santa Cruz County dining scene, well, a “scene.” In the decade that I have been at the helm at GT, I continue to be impressed with the food industry here. The amount of creativity running through the veins of some of the foodies is downright impressive. But I also think about what it actually takes to maintain a restaurant, a catering business, a winery, even a wine bar like Cava in Capitola. (I was there last week for some fun.)

These individuals who deliver us food on the plate are super heroes in my book. I’m not just saying that because I’m a bit high on chocolate at the moment. I’m saying it because I happen to believe it to be true. So, this week, tell the workers in the food and wine places you visit how much you value their contribution. Sometimes they need a little seasoning, too.

Speaking of food, in News this week we ask the question: Where does food go when the expiration dates hit? Talk about illuminating. Bite into that one. Elsewhere in News, we bring forth issues surrounding teen bullying and gang involvement. The subject is part of the 13th annual youth symposium that is unfolding locally.

There’s plenty more in between, including notes about a few St. Patrick’s Day celebrations, some great local music acts hitting the bill this week, and more. But don’t forget: The voting for the Best of Santa Cruz County ends soon, so go online at and cast your votes for your favorite local people, places, things and more. So far this year, voting online has surpassed expectations—thousands of readers have flooded our site to cast their votes. Keep it up, Cruzans. We appreciate your input and feedback.

In other “voting” news, be sure to send good vibes to local guy James Durbin, who’s been capturing the national spotlight as one of the top finalists on American Idol. How far will Durbin go? I guess that’s up to America—and, yes, us.

Stay tuned ...

Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief

Letters to the Editor

Yes To La Bahia

Many thanks for your comprehensive

article on the new La Bahia (GT March 3), which is an extremely important project for Santa Cruz on several levels:

1. The yearly income will greatly enhance the fiscal health of the city and support essential services for decades to come; funds that are generated through taxes will support our city's workforce and guarantee good-paying union jobs.

2. Because the new hotel will be state-of-the-art—environmentally speaking—it will attract eco-tourists from around the world who will visit our Marine Sanctuary.

3. Tourists will spend millions of dollars a year in local businesses, which will create jobs for those who live here.

4. The beautiful, appropriately scaled building will not only revitalize the main beach but greatly enhance coastal access for local residents and tourists alike.

5. Not one dime of tax-payer money will be spent to build the new La Bahia.

6. Because the parcel is already developed, the natural environmental will be minimally affected.

7. The new La Bahia has broad support in our community; the project has been thoroughly reviewed and it's time to move forward with this extremely beneficial addition to our city.

Gigo deSilvas

Santa Cruz

La Bahia: What’s The Fuss?

A parallel can be drawn between La Bahia with another fine Barry Swenson project built in Santa Cruz, the St. George. In 1993, the St. George had just been completed; I was doing an internship with Legal Aid Society of Santa Cruz Cruz and got to know a number of the attorneys there. There had been a vocal, "SAVE THE OLD ST. GEORGE" campaign, which Legal Aid worked on, just as there are lawsuits pending now against a new and much improved, La Bahia. The lead attorney involved in that effort, who shall remain nameless, told me now that he had seen the "new" St. George that it had been a mistake to try and save the old one. Most sane folks would agree, with the added benefit of hindsight. I suspect that once the new La Bahia is built, people will wonder what all the fuss was about and marvel at how wonderful it is on many levels. I wish the project the best of luck. I think it is going to be a fantastic addition to our coastline. And long overdue.

Kevin S. Cummings

Santa Cruz

La Bahia: Deserves Public Support

I sincerely appreciate the leadership of Good Times as demonstrated by its enthusiastic support of the La Bahia property. I, too, am a supporter of the project though not for any self-serving purposes as some might think. (Relatively few people staying in properties near the Boardwalk make the trek to Capitola—thank you Highway 1!) Rather, as a longtime resident of the city and one who desires to see more practical decisions by all our political office holders, my public support is very personal and includes an outreach to Mark Stone a few weeks ago. As a commissioner from this region, Mark’s position will be a vital element for a favorable Coastal Commission decision.

The courageous taking of a position by Good Times on this project is considered invaluable by those of us in the community who desire to see a sustainable future for our city. Hopefully, the clear message you sent to the entire community in last week’s issue will not be ignored by the commissioners. In any event, the leadership exhibited by your bold and well-written feature will forever be appreciated.

Ted Burke

Co-owner, ShadowbrookBest of The Online Comments

On ‘La Bahia’ ...

The project looks fantastic and fits right into the neighborhood. The Leed certified green design will help the community and our kids generation. The bikes will minimize any traffic impact. The tenants and homeowners in the area and entire city will benefit. Let's welcome in Santa Cruz's new landmark!


On ‘UCSC $6K P.I. Hire’ ...

The line that really gets me is when the grad student talks about how he and other TAs are paid less than $6,000 for an entire quarter's worth of work- they grade papers (the classes are too big for the professors to grade 300 papers and still do their research), hold office hours every week to work one-on-one with students, and teach small discussion sections to supplement the fact that even our upper division courses are often in the hundreds.

Why is there no money to hire badly needed TAs and to keep courses from being cancelled, yet when the administration needs to protect its ass to pay a PI for two days work, $6,000 is no question?

Obviously, $6,000 in terms of the UC's budget as a whole is pennies, meaningless even, but it's actions and decisions like this one, which keep being made over and over again by the administration, that illustrate that the people in charge of this campus do not give a shit about the students, workers, professors, TAs, and the public in general and only about covering their own asses.

No real surprise here that the guys on top are a bunch of selfish, scared and cowardly assholes. Still, it's decisions like these that enrage me.

Jessica H.

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