Santa Cruz Good Times

Monday
Apr 27th
Text size
  • Increase font size
  • Default font size
  • Decrease font size

From the Editor

greg_archerPlus Letters to the Editor

Sometimes it’s good to look back in time. During the extended Fourth of July holiday—by the way, thank you tourists (so many of you!) for contributing to our local economy—I recalled when I first got really jazzed about the Fourth. I was a young kid and it was during the Bicentennial. (If you’re under 21, please Google that and send me a report.) It was around the same time the movie version of 1776 came out. So, a year prior to the 200th birthday of America, there was all this hoopla in the air and you couldn’t help but feel the excitement.

That said, I wondered if, say, July 10 feels jipped? Wouldn’t that be a good day to celebrate something? And if so, what? I went looking and came up empty, which in the vast scope of historty left me a bit bewildered. Some things that happened: In 1965, the Beatles' VI album hit No. 1 and stayed there for a good six weeks.

July 10 was also the day the Rolling Stones landed its first  No.1 song, "I Can't Get No Satisfaction.” Flashforward 20 years, to 1985, and you’ll find Playboy publishing a full frontal nude of Madonna. (Ah, modern times.) The biggest news I found—in my hours and hours of vast research, of course—was that Wyoming became the 44th state back in 1890. So, here’s to you. Wyoming. We’ll be celebrating you this weekend.

Actually, most of us may be recovering from the last. And if that’s the case, dive into this week’s cover story in which writer J.D. Ramey uncovers the truly vibrant creative world of local photographer Kyer Wiltshire. Some of you may be familar with the popular photographer’s work. His images of Burning Man certainly stand out, but his ability to capture nature in its most breathtaking form, as well as glimpsing what he calls the “divine feminine,” is impressive. All this is chronicled in Wiltshire’s book, too, which you can learn about. Find out more.

In  the meantime, whatever day you find yourself reading this ... celebrate it.


Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief


Letters to the Editor

You Say Potato ...
Regarding your recent health articles, who would have thunk? Meat and potatoes‚—basic staple of the American diet, now held responsible for our growing obesity epidemic.
A federally funded Harvard University analysis of data collected over 20 years from more than 120,000 Americans found that meat and potatoes were the main culprits in weight gain, while fruits, vegetables, and nuts prevented weight gain. The analysis was published in this week’s issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.   
So much for the meat industry’s claim of high-nutrient density for their product. It’s more like high weight density.
So, the next time the fast food clerk asks if "you want fries with that,"tell him to hold the greasy hamburger and give you a nice salad instead.
Preston Daniels
Santa Cruz

Trail? What Trail?
In response to the recent bike article, I went for a bike ride today with my trusty Pentax to get some exercise, and hopefully a few photos. Since I was riding past Quail Hollow ranch, I thought I'd swing in for a few minutes, but right on the front gate was a sign that said "No Bicycling." I know that bicycles aren't welcome on just about any trails around here, but it seems odd that you aren't even allowed in the gate if you aren't on something making more noise and smog, or at least road apples.
Larry Colen
Felton

Best Online Comments

On ‘Mountain Biking Floods Residents’ Patience by Daniel Woo
If there were an opening for LEGAL downhill trails, many more riders would volunteer their time and effort to maintaining these trails, and keeping a "good grace" with the community as well. Santa Cruz is an international spotlight in the mountain biking world, yet we only have ONE legal park we can ride and build on. But also, riders need to be more respectful to the owners of the land we ride on. Hell,
why not offer to drink a beer with them and talk it over instead of smash their windshields??
Zach Sylvester

On ‘Gay Santa Cruz: Then and Now by John Laird
Nice summary, John! Just one quibble— the Capitola bathroom busts mostly were not gay men, they were "straight" men looking for gay sex. I think that's an important distinction to be clear on! (And one, I remember hearing, was a young man who was pretty much innocently entrapped.) But it was fun to read a pleasant retrospective of local LGBT history.
Joe E.

On ‘Page Turner by Jillian Singh
What an inspiring story of these young ladies' accomplishments. The magazine is a real delight. Correction: "Megan" O'Hara is actually Maggie O'Hara.
Sue Meadows

On ‘Learning To Adaptby Elizabeth Limbach
The wildlife of my Riverside, Santa Cruz neighborhood of the late 70s is long gone. And in the rural Monterey County neighborhood where I've lived since, wildlife has been booted from habitat by developments on the Hwy 68/Monterey-Salinas corridor—e.g., when Monterra was built, wild boar migrated to my garden, mountain lion to the trees along my lane. What a concept—to plan for wildlife migration with a new kind of corridor!
Mari Lynch


Unfortunately, “The remarkable and sad thing about the book,” he says, “is that almost nothing has changed—I could write that book today and it wouldn’t be very different.” Holds true for most things in this area. We can only hope that one day, this will be a history book and not a current events book.
Logan
Comments (0)Add Comment

Write comment
smaller | bigger

busy
 

Share this on your social networks

Bookmark and Share

Share this

Bookmark and Share

 

We Can Rebuild You

A look back at how downtown Santa Cruz recovered from the 1989 earthquake

 

International Earth Day—Mother Earth Day

Every April 22, humanity celebrates International Mother Earth Day and Earth Day. As more than a billion people participate in Earth Day activities every year, Earth Day has become the world’s largest civic observance. The massive concern to build right relations between humanity and the living being we call Earth is evidence of humanity’s love of the Mother. In 2009, the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed April 22 International Mother Earth Day, with a significant resolution affirming “the interdependence existing among human beings, other living species (the kingdoms—mineral, plant, animal and human) and the planet itself, the Earth which we all inhabit.” The Earth is our home. Celebrating Earth Day helps us define new emerging processes (economic, social, political) focused on the well-being of the kingdoms. Through these, humanity seeks to raise the quality of life, foster equality and begin to establish right relations with the Earth. We dedicate ourselves to bringing forth balance and a relationship of harmony with all of nature. Learn about planting a billion trees (the Canopy Project); participate in 1.5 billion acts of green. Disassociation (toward Earth) is no longer viable. We lose our connection to life itself. Participation is viable—an anchor, refuge and service for all of life on Earth. Visit earthday.org; harmonywithnatureun.org; and un.org/en/events/motherearthday for more information. From Farmers Almanac, “On Earth Day, enjoy the tonic of fresh air, contact with the soil, companionship with nature! Go barefooted. Walk through woods, find wildflowers and green moss. Remain outside, no matter the weather!” Nature, Earth’s most balanced kingdom, heals us. The New Group of World Servers is preparing for the May 3 Wesak Buddha Taurus solar festival. We prepare through asking for and offering forgiveness. Forgiveness purifies and like nature, heals.

 

The New Tech Nexus

Community leaders in science and technology unite to form web-based networking program

 

Dark Magic

40 years on the movie beat in Santa Cruz
Sign up for Good Times weekly newsletter
Get the latest news, events

RSS Feed Burner

 Subscribe in a reader

Latest Comments

 

Oral Fixations

Blown away by a Tuesday night dinner at Oswald

 

If you could live in Santa Cruz in any era besides now, which would you choose?

Probably the ’70s, because Santa Cruz is such a fly-your-freak-flag place. That was when free love and hippiness was in vogue. Shane Reber, Santa Cruz, Caretaker

 

Sarah’s Vineyard

Sarah’s Vineyard of Gilroy is known for crafting fine wines—and one of my all-time favorites is its Chardonnay. But this time, its Viognier has my vote.

 

Munch

East Coast meets West Coast in new meat lover’s paradise