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Dec 18th
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From the Editor

greg_archerPlus Letters to the Editor


Steve Jobs. Dead. No doubt the co-founder of Apple is biting into fruit of another kind, wherever he may be. News of Jobs’ death last week quickly captured headlines in print and television. If you’re an “Apple person”—and even if you’re not—no doubt you’ve thought of the man that helped profoundly shift the way we interact with our computers and communications equipment. The man made a dent, that is for certain. I can recall being lured into the Mac world back in the ’80s. I was interning for the Lyric Opera Theater at Arizona State University and that small Mac, boxed as it was, with a floppy disk drive to boot, was where my journey began. Today, many of us are feeling the ripple of effect of Jobs’ enterprising visions—whether it be on our smart- phones or personal computer devices. R.I.P Steve. Here’s to jobs well done.

Inspiration and transformation is at the forefront of a unique series of events that captured my interest lately. It’s dubbed “Money Mystics Intro Evenings,” a series of engaging if not lively interactive discussions led by local Ben Saltzman. Some of you may be familiar with Saltzman’s fascinating Enneagram work and life coaching. The Monday evening excursions are designed to help shift one’s views and relationship with money. All this during an economic time when money issues have never been more heightened. There are several more evenings slated, beginning with Oct. 17, followed by Nov. 7. See page 58 for more information, but I wanted to share that information since we all seem to be hyper aware of money matters these days.

In the meantime, some of us may find inspiration in other ways. The athletes who delve into the art of WWE certainly do. It’s the subject of this week’s cover story, so dive in beginning on page 14 and learn more about the locals who take to the ring, hit the mat—and other things—in the wild world of modern-day wrestling.

Thanks for reading. Until next time ...


Greg Archer | Editor-in-Chief



Letters to the Editor

Recovery Process?

I found mention of economic recovery on pages four and five of last week's Good Times. The recent political uses of the term "recovery" need a little deconstructing.

On the one hand, optimism—"Let's recover!"—is essential. But those who employ the rhetoric of recovery are the very people who are creating debt and devaluing the dollar as the means of 'solving' problems that are themselves created by debt. When the cure for debt is more debt--and this the only solution on the table in Europe as well as here—the debt will ultimately not be honorably paid.

What governments do is pay off their debt obligations in devalued currency; those left holding the inflated notes take all the losses. This has already happened twice in the United States, with the Continental during the Revolutionary War, and again with the Greenback during the Civil War.

Let our public servants speak of "recovery" when sustainable measures are being put into practice, not the very same measures that have caused the problems, that comprise the problems, and that make the problems worse.

Richard Flacco

Santa Cruz



Paint These Walls

Regarding La Bahia, this is a request for Charles Canfield to act on his words of commuinty pride and direct the Seaside Company to paint the La Bahia’s exterior walls. Given the Costal Comission’s recent decision, it no longer serves a purpose to have the building look deralick and as if it should be torn down. It is high time a little of the paint and landscaping lavished on the Beach Boardwalk be applied to his company’s eyesore property just across the street, the La Bahia apartments. In his own words concerning plans for the Beach Street area, Charles Canfield has stated:

"If people live in a really terrible environment, they develop no pride of place. That's not conducive to community. I think it's healthy that this community wants to change, and we want to help it with a commitment of resources and an investment of capital—plain old dollars."

"The next thing I'm gonna do is build apartments upstairs, give these kids some place nice to live.”

"I think I wanted to show I could do a better job providing housing than the government could."

“If I can make a profit and reinvest it— I'll go at risk to make improvements.” (Metro Santa Cruz May 7-13, 1998)

Charles, it is time to paint and re-landscape the La Bahia, lest the Canfields and La Bahia be remembered in less favorable words.

"Zero maintenance, rampant vandalism, rising rents and drug dealing problems, plus one of the owners jailed for trying to sink his yacht to collect insurance, led to public characterizations that they were slumlords," local historian Ross Eric Gibson writes in Empire of the Casa Del Rey (former name of the La Bahia). "And this former showplace a flophouse."

Mark Neenan

Santa Cruz



Best Online Comments


On  ‘Transfigurations’ ...

This for me defines courage. I have seen individuals in the process of transitioning and I am always in awe of them. When so many of us refuse to accept even the most banal truths about ourselves it is both refreshing and inspiring to see people taking acceptance of themselves in such a concrete and public way. Admittedly, my issues lack the gravitas of those addressed here, but, through their examples, I can say "Well, hell, if they can do that ...”

—Chad Silva


On  ‘Sound of the Underground’ ..

Great article. I am a musician too, who is also suffering from Santa Cruz's lack of support for alternative music and musicians. It wasn't mentioned that we also have a huge problem of there being almost no loud practice spaces available to rent on a monthly basis. People either have to play out of the storage yard in Watsonville or haul their gear up and down a narrow, steep staircase. The bulk of us without the fortune to have a garage to insulate, have to push our luck with neighbors or abstain from full sonic expression. I also find it ironic that this noise ordinance somehow applies to live music yet we have a rampant party scene thoughout Santa Cruz which hardly warrants a visit from the city police even at 2 a.m. despite multiple complaint calls on record.

—punksurfrocker


I could give a s***t if bands get fined $500 for violating noise ordinances. There's a lot of people in this town who work hard, have children, and actually do things worthwhile for this community - they have to SLEEP at night in order to do these things during the day.  P.S. None of this is "drug and alcohol free.”

—Chelseagirl


Such an awesome article! Long live Bane shows! He's helped so many bands, like mine, get shows/ break into the scene.

—ALEE

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2014 is almost over. Wednesday, Dec. 17, the Jewish Festival of Light, Hanukkah, begins. We are in our last week of Sag and last two weeks of December. Sunday, Dec. 21 is winter Solstice, as the sun enters Capricorn (3:30 p.m. for the west coast). Soon after, the Capricorn new moon occurs (5:36 p.m. for the west coast)—the last new moon of 2014. Sunday morning Uranus in Aries (revolution, revelation) is stationary direct (retro since July 22). Uranus/Aries create things new and needed to anchor the new culture and civilization (Aquarius). We will see revolutionary change in 2015. Capricorn new moon, building-the-personality seed thought, is, “Let ambition rule and let the door to initiation and freedom stand wide (open).” Capricorn is a gate—where matter returns to spirit. But the gate is unseen until the Ajna Center (third eye), Diamond Light of Direction, opens. Winter solstice is the longest day of darkness of the year. The sun’s rays resting at the Tropic of Capricorn (southern hemisphere) symbolize the Christ (soul’s) light piercing the heart of the Earth, remaining there for three days, till Holy Night (midnight Thursday morning). Then the sun’s light begins to rise. It is the birth of the new light (holy child) for the world. A deep calm and stillness pervades the world.The entire planet is revivified, re-spiritualized. All hearts beating reflect this Light. And so throughout the Earth there’s a radiant “impress” (impressions, pictures) given to humanity of the World Mother and her Child. The star Sirius (love/direction) and the constellation Virgo the mother shines above. For gift giving, give to those in need. Give and give and then give some more. This creates the new template of giving and sharing for the new world.

 

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