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Jan 27th
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From the Editor

greg_archerPlus Letters to the Editor


It’s the season of ghoulies—hopefully they’re groovy—and other pre-Day of the Dead happenings. If you’re afraid to get your groove on, don’t fret, you may not be alone, but there is something brewing at the Museum of Art & History this weekend that may capture your attention and put you in a celebratory mood. It’s the First Annual Wearable Art Ball. Fans of FashionART Santa Cruz will appreciate this festive outing, but newbies into the wearable art scene should not feel intimidated. Taking a good cue from FashionArt Santa Cruz, MAH has teamed up with some of the principle players there for this event. For the full story, you may want to add this truly unique outing onto your list of fun things to do this weekend. Expect an unforgettable event.

If you’re craving more one-on-one time, then this week’s issue should capture your interest. In our Fall spectacle, GT spotlights the titans of the culinary scene and explores what makes their particular portal successful. At the top of the list is our cover model, Paradise Beach Grille, which has nabbed numerous, consecutive awards in the GT Best of Santa Cruz Readers’ Poll over the years.

In News this week, take note of some changes that could affect medical marijuana users. Sound off on the matter online at goodtimessantacruz.com or send us your thoughts to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

In the meantime, if you haven’t already caught our web exclusive on local Chris Rene and his X Factor experience, check it out online. Just click the music tab. Rene fuels the already stoked fires of media attention Santa Cruz is experiencing this year—beginning with James Durbin, all the way to this month’s filming of the Jay Moriarity biopic, costarring Gerard Butler. Whatever else may be happening in the world,locally, the times have been good ...


Greg Archer | Editor-in-ChiefLetters to the Editor



Every Which Way But Water

I want to thank Good Times  for opening a public forum which is critical and overdue (“Now What?” 10/20/). As a teacher for 40 plus years at Cabrillo, I feel compelled to respond.

As the Brian King interview made clear, Cabrillo’s primary response to the state’s financial crisis has been to reduce staff, classes and programs. Our administrators have painfully and conscientiously pared over $3M from our budget, and are planning to cut at least $3-4 million more next year. This “what we can do with what we have” strategy alone, however, is inconsistent with our mission and is forcing us to turn away an increasing number of students.

“The mission of Cabrillo College is to enhance the intellectual, cultural and economic vitality of our diverse community by assisting all students in their quest for lifelong learning and success in an ever-changing world.”

It doesn’t add the proviso …”if we have enough money.”

There are two ways to solve a problem of insufficient funding: cut operations or find more money. We are in a position to make a significant decision. Do we continue to be totally dependent on the Sacramento dole, which is failing us and forces us to abandon our mission by reducing services to our community at a time when the demand for those services is dramatically increasing? … or do we live our mission regardless of state finances and seek real local funding (voluntary, not tax based) from our community, which created this school and looks to us to meet its needs?

Why should we let Sacramento determine the future of our local community’s college? If every registered voter in the County gave $25 (one lunch or a week of lattés) to Save Our School, we could make up the deficit and not have to cut any classes or jobs. The King interview demonstrates that the local big donations have not been obvious or adequate to reverse the downtrend. When money is so tight, we need a well-organized, one-time drive for a few dollars per person to SOS.

My impression is that, till now, the community has not been sufficiently aware of the seriousness of the problem and, if asked, might be willing to rally to the cause. We’ve produced many thousands of appreciative alumni who care about Cabrillo. We should have faith in that community. And I think most local citizens, who have derived benefit from our college and/or have students in their families, might have just cause for resentment if we unilaterally dismantle their college without informing them of its needs and giving them the option to help save it.

Jim Funaro

Aptos


Best Online Comments


On  ‘The Breast Cancer Bill’ ...

As a stage IIIB breast cancer survivor I am so angry that the medical profession has led women to believe that the "all clear" letter they receive after a yearly mammogram is lacking vital information regarding breast density. Ninety percent of women have never been told by their doctors that they have dense breast tissue that can mask a tumor on a mammogram.

An early-stage diagnosis results in less invasive treatment, fewer medical costs and a much higher rate of survival. ALL women should be provided their breast density information.

Remember doctors you took an oath: Do no harm.

—Marci Goorabian


It seems a violation of informed consent not to reveal this critical information to women. It is known, it is reported to the doctor, and yet we do not receive it. Wrong, wrong, wrong!

I, too, had faithful mammograms for over a decade. I had a "clear" mammogram in May and was diagnosed with a huge 6.7cm tumor in July of the same year— because I had dense breast tissue.             This "anxiety" excuse makes me want to spit. Women with dense tissue SHOULD be anxious! Mammograms are inadequate!

—Beverly Lovelace

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Santa Cruz area movie theaters >
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Spread more kindness and compassion.